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    #31
    did not like it
    "A general is only as good as the people he commands."

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      #32
      I liked it, But it would seem more beneficial for these super-kids to teach dozens (or more) of the other Orban what they know, rather than passing on nanites.

      I also wish they would have looked more into why the Goa'uld left Orban, as well as, them mentioning that the Goa'uld may have been on Earth as recently as the eighth century AD, causing the downfall of the Teotihuacan, the people from whom the Orbanians are descended.
      Last edited by QuiGonJohn; 29 April 2005, 11:47 AM.

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        #33
        Originally posted by blingaway
        I just watched Learning Curve again today, and got to wondering about the future societal implications.

        Any decent culture cares for their members who are impaired in some way, through congential defects or by trauma, and decent people harbor no predjudice for those who cannot learn. The people of Orban take pride in how well they care for their ex-super-learners, and I can see how with the nanite learning process they use that it just may not have occured to them to try to teach the children.

        With teaching, the ex-uron children will be able to participate in the society again but they will be fundamentally different from the majority population who rely on nanites. Will they be allowed to pursue the subjects they once had mastered, or will it be considered redundant and pointless, even if it interests the child?

        Will they have equal access to resources to develop traditional schools for learning? Will the Orban nanite people try to take an "equal but separate" approach to the ex-uron people? The nanite-less people will be a small minority, and the Orbanian people seems focused on quick advancement. It would take an awfully compassionate set of leaders to try to keep the ex-urons fully integrated into the life and societal structure on Orban and not just consider them baggage.
        Are they capable of learning the old-fashioned way anymore? The brain is a fragile thing, and by the time one reaches puberty the ability of the brain to recover from or compensate for severe trauma (such as removing a large portion of the cells, artificial or otherwise, that make up the brain) is not really that great. Those nanites were functioning as the neurons that stored complex data, and did so almost from birth. How much would the brain have rerouted from birth to take advantage of those artificial neurons? And how much would it have to reroute functions to deal with the sudden loss of those neurons? I'd bet that it pretty much fries the higher cognitive processes--and that's why the kids are in that institution. I mean, if they're normal intelligence, even if they can't learn the way other people do they could still live with their families, when you consider that their families are obviously proud of them and care for them. But if they're funtionally retarded, well, then it makes much more sense to institutionalize them. Notice that Merrin doesn't talk at all when Jack comes to visit her; neither does what's-his-name, the kid Daniel and Teal'c visited earlier. The kids are happier with the knowledge of how to play and finger-paint and stuff, which is all to the good--but that doesn't change what's been done to them.
        My LiveJournal.

        If you can find a path with no obstacles, it probably doesn't lead anywhere.
        -Frank A. Clark

        An optimist may see a light where there is none, but why must the pessimist always run to blow it out?
        -Michel de Saint-Pierre

        Now, there's this about cynicism. It's the universe's most supine moral position. Real comfortable. If nothing can be done, then you're not some kind of **** for not doing it, and you can lie there and stink to yourself in perfect peace.
        -Lois McMaster Bujold, "The Borders of Infinity"

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          #34
          Originally posted by stargate barbie
          goood episode. can't believe most of the stuff the air force advisors let sg-1, hammond and jack in particular away with. but hey, its just a tv show. i keep trying to remind myself of that.

          great character interaction in this one. some great lines. plus we get the naquadah reactor. yay. and we see that sam isn't completely super sam, when she has some minor trouble understanding the exact workings of the reactor at first. i never got that whole super sam thing myself though.

          still though. i liked this one a lot.
          Well, I do think there would have been more severe repercussions in rl for Jack's stunt. But as to his general insobordinate nature? Season 4, "Prodigy." General Ryan, who visits at the beginning of the ep? That was really General Ryan, the head of the AF at the time. RDA asked him if there were really colonels in the USAF as cocky and mouthy as him. Ryan replied to the effect that there were many who were worse, and he was doing a fine job.
          My LiveJournal.

          If you can find a path with no obstacles, it probably doesn't lead anywhere.
          -Frank A. Clark

          An optimist may see a light where there is none, but why must the pessimist always run to blow it out?
          -Michel de Saint-Pierre

          Now, there's this about cynicism. It's the universe's most supine moral position. Real comfortable. If nothing can be done, then you're not some kind of **** for not doing it, and you can lie there and stink to yourself in perfect peace.
          -Lois McMaster Bujold, "The Borders of Infinity"

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            #35
            That was really General Ryan, the head of the AF at the time. RDA asked him if there were really colonels in the USAF as cocky and mouthy as him. Ryan replied to the effect that there were many who were worse, and he was doing a fine job.
            Hmm - that's an interesting peice of information, thanks for sharing it

            --

            I thought this episode was overall interesting - it was another nice non-action episode, although it did get a little slow in places, which is my only criticism.

            It was nice to see this side of Jack with his reactions to the children, and was also nice to see the school scenes outisde the SGC. It shows good depth to his character, and is interesting in relationship to what we know happened with Charlie.

            Also, I enjoyed seeing a culture with different perspectives to ours in this way, and the reactions this caused. Something so different to what we are used to.

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              #36
              I like to see episodes like this where they are visiting new planets(which is why I started watching in the first place). It's good to see how the writers and production team think how a different civilisation would be. And this was certainly different,the kids were great and it was nice to see jack in his element. Enjoyable one-off.

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                #37
                Originally posted by Naquida Guy
                Really, I think that sums up Jack O'Neill though. Jack has a very black and white view of the world, and he's very consistant in his expression of it. When he orders Carter to blow up the Naquida generator in Scorched Earth, or when he passes judgment upon another civlization in Beneath the Surface. Heck, when he orders the Iris closed in The Other Side (and you can see Sam doesn't like that decision). Things are always right or wrong with Jack, and if he feels strongly enough about something, he doesn't much care what his superiors (or anyone else) think of it.
                True. Jack's something of a contradiction that way, though. I would say he's probably the most pragmatic out of the four - he seems the most willing to turn a blind eye to things that might be right for us but not for other people (hence his suicide mission to destroy the Stargate, Abydonians and all, in the movie). He's military-minded that way. On the other hand, when something rubs him the wrong way morally he won't rest until he's made it better. He can be everything from a kidnapper to a stone-cold angel of death when he feels his wrath is riteous.

                Decent episode. Great concept, but zero action. Cute kid, I like her interactions with Carter. Still a little unclear as to what Jack taught Merrin by having her paint abstractly...seemed a little mean about it. But I guess he got the job done. Fun watching him with the kids.

                I like his last line to Merrin, too, when they're drawing on the wall. "Do you know what a dog is? Dogs are some of my favorite people."

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                  #38
                  I like to see episodes like this where they are visiting new planets and no loneger going to Abydos and Chulak or staying on Earth! And this was certainly different,the kids were great and it was nice to see RDA in his element playing Jack. Enjoyable one-off.

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                    #39
                    I still felt it was wrong of Jack to disturb the other race's culture. We shouldn't dictate what others should do.

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                      #40
                      Originally posted by Tezzador
                      I still felt it was wrong of Jack to disturb the other race's culture. We shouldn't dictate what others should do.

                      That's the only thing I did not like about this episode, pretty solid episode, IMHO.

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                        #41
                        this was another good epidsode of SG-1
                        My DVD Collection http://www.dvdaficionado.com/dvds.ht...id=deathshadow

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                          #42
                          A good episdoe. Especially delving into Jack's character but beside that just a run-of-the-mill episode.

                          timdalton007

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                            #43
                            What was with jack the kidnapper? very out of character I thought.
                            sigpic

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                              #44
                              I thought it was in character. He thought Merrin was in danger, he took it upon himself to save her.

                              My only problem was he didn't seem to want to listen to her.
                              I'm a girl! A girly girly girl!

                              Okay, you got me. I can't accept change. This message may look like it was typed on a computer and posted on the internet, but it is actually cave drawings delivered by smoke signals.

                              Naquada Enhanced Chastity Belts -SG1 edition. On sale now! Heck, I'll give them away

                              Daniel Jackson Appreciation and Discussion -because he's more than pretty

                              http://forum.gateworld.net/showthread.php?t=89


                              Daniel Jackson: The Beacon of Hope and The Man Who Opened the Stargate

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                                #45
                                Well you could argue that he knew she didn't know what was good for her. But i thought the whole thing was very sketchy and weird.
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