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    FAN REVIEWS: The Return, Part 2

    Visit the Episode Guide
    STARGATE ATLANTIS - SEASON THREE
    EPISODE NUMBER - 311

    The Atlantis team goes against orders to try and save Atlantis from Replicator control -- and to rescue General O'Neill and Richard Woolsey, who are trapped in the occupied city.

    VISIT THE EPISODE GUIDE >>



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    Last edited by GateWorld; February 6, 2021, 09:30 PM.

    #2
    The first part of The Return was so successful in building anticipation for the conclusion that there was the risk that Part 2 would not live up to the high level of expectation. Luckily, Part 2 is good enough to satisfy those expectations. It is hugely enjoyable and good fun. The storyline manages to deliver action galore, a suitably dramatic climax and a more substantial role for its major guest star, Richard Dead Anderson. However, although this is definitely an above-average outing for SGA, there is still room for improvement, both with a few gaping plot holes and the SGC scenes.

    The SGC scenes do provide some function in clearing up loose ends; the codes of the Atlantis team being deleted, the plans for what will happen to the mid-way station, and to reiterate that the Daedalus is still on track to execute the standing orders to nuke the city despite the rescue mission mounted by Sheppard et al. However, given that one short scene up front could do all this, there is a question mark over whether all the scenes back at the SGC are necessary. Certainly, cumulatively, they feel like unwanted intrusions as they break the building tension generated by the fabulous action sequences back on Atlantis. It would have been much more preferable to have given the screen time to Richard Dean Anderson and Robert Picardo.

    The two actors have fantastic comedic chemistry together and their scenes with the panicking Woolsey and the sanguine, dry wit of classic Jack are a joy. They provide much of the initial humour within the episode with their exchanges on the food, the explosions, Sheppard’s timing, and simply Woolsey’s inability to handle the situation. Adding David Hewlett’s McKay to the comedic duo provides even more comic relief both in the scene of directing Jack underwater and with the fake escape plan. Even later in the more serious scenes of torture, Jack and Woolsey continue to provide the lightness to an otherwise action-oriented script as Jack banters with the Asurans with the same impudence that he has previously used with the Goa’uld.

    All in all, it really felt like the Jack of the old SG1 days had indeed returned; his primary role as action hero is well resurrected as he rescues the trapped Atlantis team from the underwater jumper bay, he uses humour when captured to disarm and confuse, and he’s suitably commanding both with Sheppard, Weir and Caldwell. There are also a couple of allusions to SG1’s canon with Jack noting it’s not the first time he’s been probed mentally and that it’s good not to have tiny robots within you. His mentions of Carter both when the ultimate plan is revealed, and in the final scene with Weir, also serve as a nod back to SG1, and continue, whether intentionally or not, the tease for those hoping to see the two military officers ending up together. Certainly, the return of this Jack evokes a sense of nostalgia for the classic SG1 days.

    If the return of Jack is one major success of the episode, the team feel generated by the storyline is another. All the characters have a role to play in the rescue although Sheppard, Weir and McKay are given the bulk of the dialogue and scenes. It was good though to see Beckett utilised to deploy the drones from the chair and Teyla take down the guards. In all their combined scenes, there is a real sense of the six regular characters acting and responding to the situation as a team.

    The action sequences are another success. All are done brilliantly from the explosion of Stargate Operations, the chase with the jumper and drones through the city, not to mention the drones being deployed to take out the star drive. The musical underscore heightens the tension and excitement; the shots are well executed and the special effects fabulous. They really work on all levels and it is difficult to fault any aspect of the action sequences or special effects within the episode.

    However, there are a few gaping plot holes that litter the storyline; if the drones could be deployed to hit a target underwater, why did they veer away when Sheppard took the jumper into the ocean? If Jack figured out that they were being used for misinformation why didn’t the Asurans discover this when they probed his mind again? And given the Asurans were able to access Jack and Woolsey’s minds enough to know about and activate Niam, why didn’t they just send a team straight away to the jumper bay to apprehend the team?

    While these questions no doubt will plague fans in their sleep, the pace of the action is enough to gloss over these on first viewing. The ending is also suitably happy and dramatic enough to leave most viewers satisfied customers with the rewind trick neatly executed and the surprise of the real plan. The scenes where the Asurans are destroyed by the wave definitely provide a ‘wow’ moment. Perhaps the following scene with the Daedalus detracts a little but is worth it to see Jack pulling rank on Caldwell. The scene as Jack agrees to the team staying on Atlantis provides the happy ending and as Weir gives Jack a thank you hug, a nice warm fuzzy feeling descends.

    Overall, like the previous instalment, the episode is much more of a success than a failure. The story itself is successful even with its areas for improvement, and is immensely enhanced by some outstanding special effects and great performances by the guest cast especially Anderson who seems to enjoy revisiting O’Neill. These elements combine to produce a highly enjoyable episode, flaws and all, and it certainly sets a reasonably high standard for the second half of the season.
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    Comment


      #3
      I didn't write a review for The Return, Part 1 - but if I had, it would have gone something a little like this: "A brilliant episode, which led from one delight to another. From seeing the midway station, to having O'Neill feature, to meeting Ancients, to having the sadness of the team having to return to Earth, to having the attack of the replicators and the brilliant cliffhanger." I was much more satisfied with The Return pt 1 than I was with SG-1's Quest pt 1, so had great expectations of this second episode.

      Unfortunately, The Return Part 2 fell a little short of it's counterpart for my liking. Although it was a good all-round SGA episode, it lacked any of the excitement and "two-parter-ness" that the first episode had. It felt like any other episode of the season as well as being quite similar in style to a few which have come before it.

      First, highest praise goes to Richard Dean Anderson and Robert Picardo for making this episode what it was. Their scenes together were pure gold, especially for an avid fan of O'Neill and Picardo's 'The Doctor' in ST Voyager. Although the Atlantis team were as good as ever, they were overshadowed by these real stars of the show. Also in this shows favour are the decent twists and turns it takes with all their different plans - was it plan A,B,C,D or F that eventually worked out? Though most viewers would've had a fair idea that the C4 plan was probably a lie, you could never quite be sure.

      I found the rewind feature of this episode particularly interesting. I don't recall it ever being used before but it worked well in this case to explain exactly how their plan had worked.

      For me, the biggest let down of this episode was the lack of Ancients. The thing I was looking forward to most at the end of Part 1 was being able to see them - perhaps a couple of them still alive, helping the team retake the city. Instead, there were only 1 or 2 brief mentions of their death at the very start of the episode. A hugely missed opportunity, one which Atlantis seems to miss quite often - just throw a plot point away and have a character quickly dismiss it rather than explore it's full potential. Similarly, the enemy was disappointing. In The Storm and The Eye the Genii's capture of the city was thoroughly exciting whereas the pegasus replicator's occupation of it seemed nothing more than a plot device that provided the basis for the story but was barely part of it. They lacked any real threat factor or personality - just repairing the city, capturing and re-capturing people.

      I was also irritated by certain aspects of the episode. First, as nice as it was to find an underwater jumper bay, it's sudden appearance was a little frustrating. Secondly, I found it hard to believe that drones could be used to attack an Ancient ship and there was a plot hole when they veered away instead of following the jumper underwater and yet were fired underwater by Beckett to target the stardrive. Thirdly, was the midway station ever destroyed? What was the point in that scene with Doctor Lee or with the entire SGC segment for that matter - the Deadalus scene at the end would've been more than sufficient to make the point that the team had been locked out. Finally, the ending was a little disappointing - a flat end to a story which had started so strong with such serious implications for the Atlantis expedition.

      So, all-in-all, this is a good episode which rounds the story off well enough but could have been a great deal stronger and continued in the epic spirit the first episode seemed to hint towards. No denying that the plot was strong, the characters were on top-form and the special effects were impressive but the disappearance of the first part's strongest plot points and a weak, instant ending, leave you slightly unsatisfied with the overall two-part experience.

      Rating - 7.5/10
      //

      O'Neill: Phasers?
      Carter: Sorry sir.

      HAPPY 40TH STAR TREK!! LIVE LONG AND PROSPER!

      Comment


        #4
        The return, part 1 was an good episode but it didn't take much to guess the outcome of this story arc. Atlantis regained, replicators killed, o'neill saved. As always, though, it is how they do it that and what happens before they do it that makes it an enjoyable episode.
        Blowing up the gate room was very unexpected as was everything else in this ep. The o'neill scenes were priceless and made me realise how much sg-1 misses him ( no offense mitchell ), showing rda at his wisecracking best. "Something exploded" so simple and yet so brilliant. The puddle jumper chase sequence was one of the things missing from Atlantis of late. I was dizzy by the end of it. Very cool. Destroying the stardrive was clever and unexpected but i couldn't help feeling that the replicaters could have done something to stop Dr.Beckett using it like when Teyla burst into the chair room did you notice how all the guards were facing one direction? This isn't the only reference to the Replicaters lack of intelligence. When they dropped the bomb in the gate room they walked up to it and just looked at it. Surely, they could have figured out it was dangerous.
        David Hewlett was very good bumbling excitedly throughout the episode with a totally believeable performance, and what a double-cross. That was so clever and it had me completly fooled except for the fact they let themselves get captured as i thought that they were just lucky the replicaters didn't probe their minds before activating the shield.Torri also gave a good performance the hug at the end finishing the episode on a nice note.
        Now on to the remainder of the flaws. I thought the drones were more powerful than showed here when crashing into Atlantis they didn't do much damage which goes against every time drones have been in Stargate. Once again Teyal was pushed onto the sidelines. She hasn't had one episode primarily about her this whole series. Why did the drones vere off course if they can go underwater?. But the worst flaw is the fact that the replicaters were not only stupid but weren't at all menacing. Replicarter and fifth were both very menacing but in this i was never truly convinced that they could stop the team. One question keeps nagging at me. Does Atlantis now have zpm left by replicaters? It was left unaswered.
        The episode is a good mix of humour, action and character moments. But it could have been much better.

        7.25/10


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        Comment


          #5
          In a surprising twist against all expectation, “Stargate: Atlantis” went from being the pale imitation of the original in its second season to the far more consistent series in the franchise this season. Despite a few hiccups along the way, the third season has been much better, presenting stronger characterization and a far more interesting season arc. The Asurans may retread the Replicator episodes of “SG-1” in many respects, but the intersection of returned Ancients, Asurans, and Team Atlantis was a breath of fresh air.

          Bringing Jack O’Neill into the mid-season event might have been an unnecessary attempt at better ratings, but it does continue to bring the two series together into one cohesive universe. Given the endless press releases during the hiatus, that is a crucial element. It also helps to remind the fans that O’Neill is still an important part of the franchise, even if Richard Dean Anderson wanted to retire.

          Team Atlantis went rogue at the end of the first half of the story, and the first half of the episode is dominated by the counter-attack on the Asurans and the resulting flight from Atlantis. The special effects are excellent during the battle scenes, particularly the several fly-bys through the city. Things only slow down and become somewhat predictable once the jumper is trapped underwater, forcing the team to call on O’Neill and Woolsey to save the day.

          Things get a lot more complicated from there, and those complications save the episode from a depressing predictability. Defeating the Asurans so quickly is not only anti-climactic, but damaging to the integrity of the season as a whole. One can only hope that the Asurans on Atlantis were only part of the overall population and that the threat is far from over. It would be a lot less impressive without the twists and turns required to retake Atlantis, especially after resolving the issue with the returned Ancients off-screen in the first half.

          The reset button is further employed with the restoration of Team Atlantis to the command of the city, despite disobeying orders from Stargate Command. With all the issues between the SGC and the international oversight, even with Woolsey tossing in the good word for Weir, it’s hard to believe that the reinstatement would go so easily. All told, this is a far more conventional conclusion than the character development-heavy first installment would have indicated.

          In fact, it’s not clear where the season will go from here. One would hope that the character development would continue, especially for characters other than McKay and Sheppard, and that the fracturing of the Wraith and its impact on the Pegasus Galaxy will be further explored. Hopefully the Asurans aren’t completely out of the picture, despite this episode’s conclusion, and there’s also the tensions with the Genii. There’s a lot out there for the writers to work with; it’s a question of pulling it together into something more than scattered plot threads.

          Comment


            #6
            Alas, I have finally chosen to write my first fan review. Huzzah!

            Anyway, first thing that comes to mind when I think back to that wonderful hour I spent Friday night in front of the TV where I was contently being entertained by the greatest show in the Pegasus galaxy, was how stunning the visual effects were. I mean, the midway station in between the two galaxies (though unrealistic in terms of scale) was already breathtaking, but a Puddle Jumper swerving in between the buildings on Atlantis was… exhilarating.

            Second thing that comes to mind is how glad I was to have O’Neill back. I forgot how funny he was! The dialogue he had with Woolsey was just great. Some people say House is the best character on TV. To me, O’Neill is right up there with him at a close tie.

            While I did find the plot to be riveting, and I rarely use that word seriously, I did have some issues with it conceptually.

            a) Would the C4 really make that many Replicators too busy to capture them? Wouldn’t it make more sense to capture Sheppard and friends as soon as they knew about the plan instead of just following them and taking the C4?

            b) Ok… it really made no sense that they didn’t explore the underwater jumper bay earlier. But, they didn’t establish the fact that the Puddle Jumpers were submersible until later on in the series so they probably didn’t think of that soon enough.

            c) More visual effects related than plot related… I couldn’t really tell, but the Atlantean moon looked a lot like our moon. This bugs me. Especially when they had three moons that looked exactly like our moon in the movie. Other moons don’t and shouldn’t look like our moon. They formed different ways with different compounds, and suffered different catastrophes on their surfaces. Would it simply be impossible for an average person to identify an object orbiting a planet as a moon/satellite if it didn’t look like ours? Ok, so maybe this sounds trivial to some, but it annoys me.

            d) I really wish that they didn’t get rid of the Ancients off camera. It would’ve been interesting to see how they would’ve tried to fight off the Replicators.

            e) Alas, even though Teyla and Weir should, in theory, be wearing the same black ops uniform, Teyla’s shirt is low cut. Maybe this isn’t TPTB’s fault… but it just gives me the impression that someone out there is trying to sex up the show.

            Even though I’ve picked apart some aspects of the plot, I want everyone reading my words to know that I enjoyed the episode. A lot.

            Carry on.

            To see a picture of me in the Miss Teen America pageant, click here.

            Comment


              #7
              Stargate Atlantis viewers were treated to an exciting, action packed beginning to the second half of season 3. “The Return Part 2” delivered in a big way with stunning CGI effects, good involvement by Colonel Jack O’Neill and by showcasing the ingenuity and steadfast determination of Team Atlantis as together they struggle to save their home.

              The story was fast paced, with enough twists and turns to keep the viewer, if not on the edge of their seat, at least surprised and captivated. Writer Martin Gero and Director Brad Turner did an excellent job of balancing the action packed scenes with those of dialogue. The interaction between O’Neill and Woolsey was classic Stargate. It was entertaining, funny and full of sarcasm. Both Richard Dean Anderson and Robert Picardo did an excellent job in making their scenes work so well and it was just plain fun to watch them together. The relative calmness of the banter between O’Neill and Woolsey was in stark contrast to the action going on elsewhere in the story – this type of back and forth editing served to heighten the excitement of the action scenes and added to the sarcastic humor between O’Neill and Woolsey. Well done.

              The highlight of the episode was most certainly the CGI effects and the underwater scenes. In particular, the scene of Sheppard flying the Puddlejumper around the city being chased by drones was amazing. In addition, the underwater scenes were outstanding. Underwater scenes are always difficult and can be dangerous to film – kudos to Richard Dean Anderson, Brad Turner and the crew for making it work so well. Other notable CGI scenes were the Gateroom exploding and the Puddlejumper crashing through the gateroom wall.

              The episode also showcased how the team worked so well and seamlessly together in their efforts to find a plan that would succeed. There was a nice balance between all members of the team in that to some degree they all played a role in executing the plan and making it work. This episode also does a pretty good job of illustrating the trust and confidence they have all developed for each other since the show first started.

              Of course there was also a new discovery about Atlantis. Finding the underwater jumper bay was an unexpected yet interesting revelation adding another layer of complexity to the mysteries of the city. This new aspect of Atlantis opens the door for some interesting possibilities in future episodes as well as reinforcing the notion that there still much that is unknown about the wonders of Atlantis.

              While the CGI and action sequences are what made the episode so entertaining and exciting, it also created a weakness in the story. “The Return Part 1” was heavy on character moments, team/friendship bonding and the passion they felt for Atlantis. This emotional edge is what would lead the viewer to believe they would be willing to risk everything – their careers, their lives – to return to Atlantis. The weakness in the episode is the lack of follow-up from “The Return part 1” on this emotional edge and most notably the lack of repercussions or at least adequate resolution. In Part 1 Gero did such a good job of setting the emotional tone of what drove the characters to return against orders to save Atlantis as well as O’Neill and Woolsey, that not following through on this aspect of it, especially after their success, was a glaring omission. There was an attempt at the end with the scene between Weir and O’Neill but it was too quick, too lacking in depth and too easy. It was unsatisfying and left the viewer feeling, “After all that….., that’s it?”

              In general, “The Return Part 2” was a wonderfully entertaining and exciting episode with great CGI, fun dialogue and good team interaction; only falling short with inadequate follow-up and resolution with the emotional tenor and events from Part 1.

              Rating:
              10/10 for being entertaining, exciting and having great CGI
              7/10 for missing the mark on character follow-up/resolution from part 1

              Comment


                #8
                Stargate Atlantis viewers were treated to an exciting, action packed beginning to the second half of season 3. “The Return Part 2” delivered in a big way with stunning CGI effects, good involvement by Colonel Jack O’Neill and by showcasing the ingenuity and steadfast determination of Team Atlantis as together they struggle to save their home.

                The story was fast paced, with enough twists and turns to keep the viewer, if not on the edge of their seat, at least surprised and captivated. Writer Martin Gero and Director Brad Turner did an excellent job of balancing the action packed scenes with those of dialogue. The interaction between O’Neill and Woolsey was classic Stargate. It was entertaining, funny and full of sarcasms. Both Richard Dean Anderson and Robert Picardo did an excellent job in making their scenes work so well and it was just plain fun to watch them together. The relative calmness of the banter between O’Neill and Woolsey was in stark contrast to the action going on elsewhere in the story. This type of back and forth editing was well done as it served to heighten the excitement of the action scenes and added to the sarcastic humor between O’Neill and Woolsey.

                The highlight of the episode was most certainly the CGI effects and the underwater scenes. In particular, the scene of Sheppard flying the Puddlejumper around the city being chased by drones was amazing. In addition, the underwater scenes were outstanding. Underwater scenes are always difficult and can be dangerous to film – kudos to Richard Dean Anderson, Brad Turner and the crew for making it work so well. Other notable CGI scenes were the Gateroom exploding and the Puddlejumper crashing through the gateroom wall.

                The episode also showcased how the team worked so well and seamlessly together in their efforts to find a plan that would succeed. There was a nice balance between all members of the team in that to some degree they all played a role in executing the plan and making it work. This episode also does a pretty good job of illustrating the trust and confidence they have all developed for each other since the show first started.

                Of course there was also a new discovery about Atlantis. Finding the underwater jumper bay was an unexpected yet interesting revelation adding another layer of complexity to the mysteries of the city. This new aspect of Atlantis opens the door for some interesting possibilities in future episodes as well as reinforcing the notion that there still much that is unknown about the wonders of Atlantis.

                While the CGI and action sequences are what made the episode so entertaining and exciting, it also created a weakness in the story. “The Return Part 1” was heavy on character moments, team/friendship bonding and the passion they felt for Atlantis. This emotional edge is what would lead the viewer to believe they would be willing to risk everything – their careers, their lives – to return to Atlantis. The weakness in the episode is the lack of follow-up from “The Return part 1” on this emotional edge and most notably the lack of repercussions or at least adequate resolution. In Part 1 Gero did such a good job of setting the emotional tone of what drove the characters to return against orders to save Atlantis as well as O’Neill and Woolsey, that not following up on this after their success was a glaring omission. There was an attempt at the end with the scene between Weir and O’Neill but it was too quick, too lacking in depth and too easy. It was unsatisfying and left the viewer feeling, “After all that….., that’s it?”

                In general, “The Return Part 2” was a wonderfully entertaining and exciting episode with great CGI, fun dialogue and good team interaction; only falling short with adequate follow-up and resolution with the emotional tenor and events started in Part 1.

                Rating 10/10 for being entertaining, exciting and having great CGI
                7/10 for missing the mark on character follow-up/resolution from
                part 1

                Comment


                  #9
                  The Return (Part 2)

                  So it's all built up to this; the Asurans taking over Atlantis, the crew reuniting to take them on, an awesome plan in the making... Part 1 suggested that the action would be awesome and this episode would be an experience like no other. So is the final part of the two parter really what Part 1 made it out to be; for the first time in Atlantis history?; I would have to say unfortunately not and this is a surprise since the second part is usually better then the first part.

                  We do get to see the crew in tip-top action form as they roam around Atlantis and do actiony things. The initial moments of the episode is something that will have most of your breaths be taken away; the jumpers flying through the city of Atlantis with impressive VFX, them blowing up their own gateroom and the moments where they run and gun through the city of Atlantis, it's a sight to see. The camera angles appropriately get across the action and sense of scale that these two-parters are known for, the pacing and choreography really get across the movement and fluidity these characters are known for and the catchphrases these people say all help to get across the feeling of the episode and if that isn't enough to wet your appetites, you even get O'Neill in a more supporting role; being charismatic, saying catchphrases like no other and just being the commander that he is (around mid-SG1 I'm guessing); his presence really helps to make this part enjoyable as he just does what he does best, being O'Neill. There's nothing more for me to say except that his appearance will likely win praise from the SG1 fanbase and the award communities themselves. (I'm always won over whenever he appears in a guest starring role.


                  Hi, I'm Jack O'Neill.

                  However, there is something off about this, something that really affects the balance. There seem to be more scenes about programming, setting stuff up and dialog then there are action; for a majority of the episode we see them go on about their plan to get rid of the Asurans, scooping up the parts needed and doing the necessary actions while they lay around for minutes at an end. Don't get me wrong, the dialog scenes are good, McKay is in decent shape, the information is necessary and it gives a sense that something big is building up but it doesn't really feel like something that should belong in Part 2; in fact I think there are more action scenes in Part 1 then there are in Part 2. Part 1 had this motivation for the characters, they were being forced, placed in situations where they don't belong and that gave us a reason to root for them as they reunited to take back Atlantis from the Asurans. In Part 2, they're all reunited, they're all ready to take over Atlantis so where's the motivation? Sure, you got them in life & death situations, you even got O'Neill risking his life to help them out but there isn't anything to truly motivate them and this spreads to the scenes which involves them going around and setting up stuff for the ultimate plan.

                  Never have I seen a Part 2 be somewhat boring. Throughout it's 44 minute running time, I couldn't luster up a sense of excitement or even expectation as I was watching this, these guys are doing their best, Atlantis is at stake and yet I couldn't get into it as much as before and it's a shame since these two parters are usually the best of Stargate; not anymore I guess... They do manage to institute somewhat of a trick though at the end that is both somewhat clever and somewhat gimmicky. I am amazed at how the writers managed to trick the audience and lay down a subtle mystery for viewers to solve, (from the people to the small hints around) there were no hints as to what was coming (okay, maybe the fact that it felt like it was setting up to a nonexistent third part.) and the near end where it's suddenly revealed. (the characters narrate the missing pieces, portions of their true plan and flashes to the major points of the episode) It's audience was greatly amazed and blown by that moment but I was not that impressed, it felt like they're super confident about their "plot twist" to the point where they praise it as their holy grail. I mean sure, it's a decent plot twist but it's not mindblowing or even revolutionary.


                  What they'll be doing for the majority of the episode.

                  I am amazed as to how the crew manages to be so lucky in this season; they waste a ZPM, they get a new one when the Ancients take over and as a plus, they also get a fully rebuilt Atlantis and three ZPM's! I mean is there anything they can't have, they have an intergalactic bridge; they have everything at their arsenal. I'm feeling like this era of Atlantis is over and a new one is beginning and this era will likely mean downfall for Atlantis as it means that they're no longer in a position of considerable downside compared to Seasons 1 and 2; they have everything they need, they have support against the Wraith, they have Atlantis will fully functioning features, it seems like nothing can stop them now. The Wraith, not so scary. The Asurans/Genii, also not scary, the various societies and their twisted ways? Not so twisted anymore... It's like the powers that be are trying to turn Atlantis away from the dark sensibilities of the earlier seasons and more towards the lighter sensibilities that recent SG-1 seasons have portrayed. While it wasn't overly dark, those dark sensibilities are what made SGA so unique (that and the Ancients) and without them, it's going to feel like SG-1 in another galaxy.

                  In closing, this second part of the two parter is good; it's exciting, it's engaging, it's enjoyable but it's also somewhat boring and it somehow manages to be lesser then the first part. The elements are there, the crew is in tip-top shape but there isn't anything that's motivating them to be more then they are; you'll have fun watching it but you'll also be disappointed, both for the expectations and for the fact that you'll be witnessing the potential downfall of Atlantis as a whole. Doesn't deter the fact that it's a good episode though.

                  8.0/10
                  Back from the grave.

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