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  1. #1
    Colonel knowles2's Avatar
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    Default Star trek discovery- the brightiest Star, a unforgivable crime committed by the Fed

    The Federation committed a unspeakable crime removing Saru from his people. They interfered in the possible evolution of there entire culture, denying this culture of not only of a genius able to learn from alien technology, but one with rebellious thoughts, that they should stand up to the people who kidnap them, That they should take and learn from their technology. that they should reach out to the cosmos.

    Think how human history would be different if someone took people like Leonardo da Vinci or galileo or Einstein from us.

    This is the whole point of the prime directive, to prevent the federation from interfering with the natural progression of a species. His removal from his species has set it back decades, even centuries.
    Last edited by knowles2; December 13th, 2018 at 05:43 AM.

  2. #2
    Colonel P-90_177's Avatar
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    Default Re: Star trek discovery- the brightiest Star, a unforgivable crime committed by the F

    Not sure where this is coming from. When is it ever stated that Starfleet "removed" him from his world.
    Please do me a huge favour and help me be with the love of my life.

  3. #3
    Lieutenant General DigiFluid's Avatar
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    Default Re: Star trek discovery- the brightiest Star, a unforgivable crime committed by the F

    Quote Originally Posted by P-90_177 View Post
    Not sure where this is coming from. When is it ever stated that Starfleet "removed" him from his world.
    Check out the third episode of the "Short Treks" series, "The Brightest Star."

    Placing my reply to the original post in spoiler tags in case you've not seen it yet....
    Spoiler:
    While I think knowles2 might be being slightly bombastic in language, I think the point being made is largely correct. Starfleet has the Prime Directive -- even in this era -- for the exact reasons that knowles says. It was one thing when we believed that he was simply the only one of his kind to leave his world, "The Brightest Star" completely revises the backstory into something that is both a violation of Starfleet's highest law, and consequently, potentially seriously damaging the development of a pre-warp civilization.
    "A society grows great when old men plant trees, the shade of which they know they will never sit in. Good people do things for other people. That's it, the end." -- Penelope Wilton in Ricky Gervais's After Life

  4. #4
    Colonel P-90_177's Avatar
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    Default Re: Star trek discovery- the brightiest Star, a unforgivable crime committed by the F

    Ok. Finally was able to catch up with Short Treks on Netflix.

    It's my view that Starfleet did nothing wrong in this case. Ultimately the Kelpians are so docile and resigned to their fate that if saru had tried to lead some sort of revolt he would have failed and he likely would have been the next one to be taken. In fact I wouldn't be surprised if their predators would have singled him out for attempting it thus further prompting Starfleet to act. His talents were wasted on his homeworld.

  5. #5
    Captain Xaeden's Avatar
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    Default Re: Star trek discovery- the brightiest Star, a unforgivable crime committed by the F

    He lived in an open air prison. He found a way to make contact with outsiders and asked them for help. The Federation may have the Prime Directive, but it also grants asylum to those who have a valid reason to request it.

    Imagine Germany won the war and Einstein ended up in a concentration camp. The only military powers left in the world are them and their allies. If Einstein managed to find someone somewhere who had the power to grant him asylum should they have refused on the grounds that there was some remote possibility that he could find a way to overthrow the entire German state?

    If so by what means is granting asylum ever acceptable in your estimation? Is it an intelligence test? If they're dumb enough, the Federation will take them in, but if they're too smart they're condemned to prison and/or death?

    In TNG, MASH actor David Ogden Stiers played Doctor Timicin. Timicin was highly intelligent, but in his planet's culture he was expected to accept death at a certain age. Lwaxana Troi convinced him to ask Picard for asylum, but even though his death was imminent, technically if he stayed and decided to fight that cultural norm from within he could possibly have had an impact. Maybe there are like minded people he could have joined up with who he could have helped lead a revolution or perhaps they could have just kept him alive long enough to continue his important work. Maybe he could have found a way to argue publicly against what was being done to him and changed people's minds, not necessarily in time to save his own life, but by sparking a debate that could have led to abolishing the practice over time.

    He ultimately decided to go back and quietly accept death, but by your logic should Picard have even granted him asylum in the first place? Again, he's super intelligent, but technically anyone could lead a revolution or make change in their society, so should anyone ever be granted asylum for any reason?

    You could possibly also argue that the situation matters. Maybe keeping someone out of prison isn't a valid enough reason for you and the person needs be in danger of death or maybe they have to be in imminent danger of death. Well Saru didn't know when he'd go through the transformation. It could've been years from then or days. Should the Federation have said; 'I'm sorry, I know you could be taken to your death any day now, but it's also possible you could live for years, so we're just going take off now, but feel free to try to reach out again when your time comes. Of course, we can't promise that we'll have a ship in range to pick up your message or respond in time. Also, it's quite possible that your overlords will figure out that you have their technology and have been using it to contact us, so they may come take that device from you or kill you any day now anyway. Good luck!"

    If an alien version of Leonardo da Vinci or Galileo or Einstein made contact with the Federation and just asked to go with them for fun and stuff, sure it would be breaking the Prime Directive to do so. But if they had the means to discover that alien life was out there and ask for asylum because they were in prison or under some form of subjection or in danger of death, that's an entirely different situation.
    Last edited by Xaeden; May 7th, 2019 at 12:59 PM.

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