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Cold Lazarus (106)

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    Not a proper comment, but I have a computer again (among the living!) and wanted to post something that occurred to me some time ago.

    The crystal beings always reminded me of something but I couldn't quite remember what it was, then, I stumbled upon it. The cover from a novel by science fiction writer Ursula K. LeGuin, 'The Left Hand of Darkness,' which I would assumed is from the early 70's.LeGuin.jpg

    I would rate 'Cold Lazarus' as a 7/8 out of 10, as I've stated previously, it's difficult for me to really think of any episodes I dislike... OK, 'One False Step' is one I really dislike and probably don't watch.
    "I met a traveller from an antique land..."

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      From the Wiki:
      "The Left Hand of Darkness is a science fiction novel by U.S. writer Ursula K. Le Guin, published in 1969. The novel became immensely popular and established Le Guin's status as a major author of science fiction.[6]

      The novel follows the story of Genly Ai, a native of Terra, who is sent to the planet of Gethen as an envoy of the Ekumen, a loose confederation of planets. Ai's mission is to persuade the nations of Gethen to join the Ekumen, but he is stymied by his lack of understanding of Gethenian culture. Individuals on Gethen are ambisexual, with no fixed sex. This fact has a strong influence on the culture of the planet, and creates a barrier of understanding for Ai.

      The Left Hand of Darkness was among the first books in the genre now known as feminist science fiction and is the most famous examination of androgyny in science fiction.[7] A major theme of the novel is the effect of sex and gender on culture and society, explored in particular through the relationship between Ai and Estraven, a Gethenian politician who trusts and helps him. Within that context, the novel also explores the interaction between the unfolding loyalties of its main characters, the loneliness and rootlessness of Ai, and the contrast between the religions of Gethen's two major nations. The theme of gender also touched off a feminist debate when it was first published, over depictions of the ambisexual Gethenians."
      "I met a traveller from an antique land..."

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