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    Originally posted by Petra View Post
    I have a love/hate relationship with this scene. I love it because it's really cute and sweet and I hate it because IMO it's one of those moments when Jack's supposed stupidity was overplayed. As Toomi said he's not stupid and after so many years at the SGC he must have *some* understanding of what's going on with the gate, especially given his position. Plus Sam's technobabble wasn't that difficult to understand.
    I was gonna say!

    Us, the viewers, certainly got why the situation with the gate was so problematic and perilous for Teal'c. Surely, Jack the SGC's 2IC could comprehend it, especially since it's been explained in laic terms.

    What I dislike most about scenes that play into Jack-is-dumb theory is that, a lot of times, they make Sam seem condescending, sort of relying on it to make the banter work. And she's not. Overall and in so many ways, she looks up at him, not down. So it just doesn't work as smoothly.

    This is not to say that I didn't also enjoy that little moment for what it was. Just. Yeah.
    you're so cute when you're slurring your speech but they're closing the bar and they want us to leave


    'What is it, Sebastian? I'm arranging matches.'


    "Religion is far more of a choice than homosexuality. And the protections that we have, for religion --we protect religion-- and talk about a lifestyle choice! That is absolutely a choice. Gay people don't choose to be gay. At what age did you choose not to be gay?" (Jon Stewart, The King of Common Sense)

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      Originally posted by Pol View Post
      Jumping into this and I, too, loved Toomi's insight.

      Samantha Carter is a woman who needs someone who is constant, steady, and loyal. Jack O'Neill epitomizes loyalty and strength.

      She is also brilliant and, in his own way, so is Jack. They complement each other.
      You're absolutly right about the steady and loyal.

      Originally posted by Petra View Post
      As usual lately I haven't seen the episode in ages; however it is one of my favourites (this season and in general) and I'll try to watch it soon and comment some more. Right now I just wanted to address some points that jumped at me.



      I watched "Need" a few days ago and wanted to say that during these 3 years in-between Daniel made an incredible progress in the art of diplomacy. In Need he was so bad - worse than Jack at his worst, tbh - and cluless that not only didn't he get his teammates released but he managed to anger Shayla's father so much that he sentenced Sam, Jack and T to death. And now, 3 years later, voila - he became so good that Hammond sent him instead of the SGC professional diplomat unit.
      Good point. I'd forgotten about that. And I like the point about dumbing Jack down to make the comparison to Rodney.

      I've seen this episode several times before, but when I did that post, I was super super tired (still am, stupid jet lag) and that was one thing that really stuck in my mind. Did they have the Rodney character written as a comparison/opposite to Jack or was it just the way things turned out?

      While Sam must be frustrated with Jack at times (when she's explaining something and he either tunes out and skips ahead, or cuts her off if he's in a hurry) she can't abide by another person that can mentally keep up with her. Rodney is an arrogant, self-centered, hypochondriac, that I came to really enjoy in later years. Sam sees that right off the bat.

      I just keep thinking back to my own relationship experiences. When you're in that beginning stage, the bit where every time they look at you, smile at you, pay a slight compliment to you, you're on cloud nine. You don't necessarily want that person telling you you're hot as a greeting, or arguing with you to make themselves seem superiour. That beginning stage is special and once it's over, it's over (it gets better!!! But it'll never be the same)

      When Jack is sitting there listening to her explain the problem with Teal'c and the 'gate, does her stomach feel like it's got butterflies? I know mine would....
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        48 Hours

        Generally
        :

        I wasn't a fan when I saw this the first time around - I was a bit "you're splitting the team up again!!" - so many episodes in S5 seemed to do that. Of course at the time I had no idea they were trying to accommodate the shooting schedule around RDA's request to spend more time with his daughter. Anyhow, I wasn't a fan of the episode first time.

        Having rewatched it a few times, I think its much more of a team episode than I originally gave it credit. It kind of reminds me of Reckoning - where they're all separated yet working for a common goal (although of course Teal'c is oblivious stuck in buffer limbo).

        Which brings me onto McKay...and Sam & Jack

        Sam & Jack:

        Actually, I don't think the writers meant to provide McKay as a contrast to Jack so much as they did to Sam.

        I think in many ways this was an episode which was meant to pit SG1 up against their anti-versions: Sam with McKay, Jack with Simmons, Daniel with Chekov, and even Teal'c with Tanith.

        McKay is the anti-Sam: as others have pointed out he's arrogant, dismissive of others' work, overtly academically competitive and ruthlessly intellectual. He has, at this point, very few people and social skills (his OTT blunt appraisal of Sam as a dumb blonde and as hot when she's angry is more a way of dismissing her as a serious consideration academically and to denigrate her scientific ability), and moreover just doesn't get the human reason why Sam is so invested in getting Teal'c out of the buffer. From McKay's perspective, it's a problem he has already intellectually solved - Teal'c is already dead.

        Sam at this point in the show was rarely scientifically challenged by anyone beyond Daniel who most of the time when he was suggesting something was "helping" in a problem resolution, and McKay provided that kind of scientific enemy for her to bounce off. So for me I don't think McKay's overt sexualisation of Sam in terms of his own attraction or the character in general was meant to indicate a serious love interest or rival to Jack or comparison to Jack.

        It's only really later in Redemption for me where I see the possible love interest aspect being suggested in the scene where Sam kisses his cheek and teases him with the idea that she found him more attractive when he was obnoxious (and I still maintain that Sam was teasing him and didn't really mean it - that she didn't really find him attractive).

        I do, however, agree with the idea that regardless of writer intent, what we do see here is McKay, a man who is as close to the intellectual equal of Sam as she's going to get in her own field, a man who shares her scientific interests, but who does not share her values or value her for anything other than the physical - which is a contrast to Jack.

        But it bugs me when people suggest Jack and Sam don't have anything in common - they have a great deal of shared military experience and knowledge - both of them are Air Force officers with a shared understanding of what that means, of the career, of the cultural institution of the armed forces, a love of flying and of astronomy, - add to that they have shared values and beliefs, and actually they have a whole heck more in common than many couples.

        Here, Jack's in support mode but he's really too injured with his concussion to be able to provide her with much beyond coffee. I will agree that the scene overplays the idea that Jack doesn't understand what Sam is saying so to highlight McKay later but I tend to go with the view that it shows he wanted to be there to support her despite his head hurting. In many ways, his hunt for Simmons and Conrad is not only to help Teal'c but his way of helping her - by trying to track down the answers for her. I love the moment with the Goa'uld when he points out that he doesn't care about the host because he kidnapped Carter.

        I also love the scene at the end when Jack asks if she really wants to be in the gateroom and Siler answers!! It's a lovely moment and actually gives away really how much Jack cares for her - although I think she writes it off as a friendship/CO moment.
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          I always thought Jack was there for Sam just for support. Sometimes just saying what you think helps clarify you thoughts. And sometimes he says things that gives her ideas (minds out of the gutter).
          Last edited by Zoser; June 16, 2010, 12:26 PM.
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            Originally posted by Rachel500 View Post
            It's only really later in Redemption for me where I see the possible love interest aspect being suggested in the scene where Sam kisses his cheek and teases him with the idea that she found him more attractive when he was obnoxious (and I still maintain that Sam was teasing him and didn't really mean it - that she didn't really find him attractive).
            I only want to say that I totally agree with this and I think that interpretation would be canon based on how the dynamic between them ultimately plays out.

            Love everyone's thoughts. Wish I had time to have some of my own LOL

            Comment


              Originally posted by Rachel500 View Post
              Having rewatched it a few times, I think its much more of a team episode than I originally gave it credit. It kind of reminds me of Reckoning - where they're all separated yet working for a common goal (although of course Teal'c is oblivious stuck in buffer limbo).
              This. As a team fan I love "48 hours" because despite SG-1 being separated it does give me team-y feeling. Jack, Sam and Daniel each focus on what they do best and cooperate to save their team member - and without the cooperation none of them would achieve anything. Which is as team-y as it can possibly get, hence my love for it.

              I think in many ways this was an episode which was meant to pit SG1 up against their anti-versions: Sam with McKay, Jack with Simmons, Daniel with Chekov, and even Teal'c with Tanith.
              Another great thought! I think you are onto something here.

              But it bugs me when people suggest Jack and Sam don't have anything in common - they have a great deal of shared military experience and knowledge - both of them are Air Force officers with a shared understanding of what that means, of the career, of the cultural institution of the armed forces, a love of flying and of astronomy, - add to that they have shared values and beliefs, and actually they have a whole heck more in common than many couples.
              Exactly. Thank you so much for saying this - I agree completely. What's more, their military background, shared beliefs, values and love of flying and astronomy aren't the end of it. There's also Cassie, being a host to a Goa'uld and a Tok'ra, sense of humour and personal interests like chess, old movies and motorcycles. Arguably you could add to these repaires of cars/bikes. Actually out of all members of SG-1, contrary to fanon, Sam and Jack have the most in common (well ok, they share the first place with Jack/Teal'c & Teal'c/Daniel). I would know, once I prepared a list of all shared interests/hobbies/ways of spending downtime of SG-1 members.

              Here, Jack's in support mode but he's really too injured with his concussion to be able to provide her with much beyond coffee. I will agree that the scene overplays the idea that Jack doesn't understand what Sam is saying so to highlight McKay later but I tend to go with the view that it shows he wanted to be there to support her despite his head hurting. In many ways, his hunt for Simmons and Conrad is not only to help Teal'c but his way of helping her - by trying to track down the answers for her. I love the moment with the Goa'uld when he points out that he doesn't care about the host because he kidnapped Carter.
              Ok, your interpretation mollifies me somewhat. Thanks, that works for me.
              There's a good chance this opinion is shared by Ashizuri
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                Synopsis
                PLOT A: The Tok’ra enlist Daniel Jackson to deliver a symbiote poison to “kill” all the goa’uld system loads who are attending a summit. However Daniel discovers Osiris – in the host of his ex girlfriend Sara Gardener – is present and does not proceed.
                PLOT B: Sam discovers that Lantash (Martouf’s symbiote) is still alive and is a tad pissed about that. The Tok’ra base gets attacked, lots of Tok’ra die and some SG members; However Latash’s glass tank is broken and he slithers into a badly injured Lt Elliott who is on his maiden mission.
                Cue cliffhanger ending.


                Favourite Scene:
                The one in the corridor with Jack and Jacob walking around, just because I love Jack and Jacob interaction.

                Favourite Quote:
                Jack: ” It's always suicide mission this, save the planet that. No one ever just stops by to say Hi any more”

                Review
                I really like this two parter, but that’s no surprise because the two parters tend to be quite big events and that’s certainly what you get on screen. I think the commentary sums it up when one of them says” money plus Martin = cool”. Yes. Quite. This episode is visually quite stunning and it’s really quite amazing what they have done with very little (in terms of the Tok’ra base) because it looks huge even though it’s about two corridors and one room for the set! And again, directed by Martin *sigh* Has he ever directed a bad episode? Not that I can think of. He really does make everything look cool – I just love the way he brings so much movement to the screen and he does that a lot here.
                It’s almost impossible to review one part without referring to the other and I don’t want to spoil that review so I’ll keep comments to a minimum.

                One thing that I love is how there are two stories going on here: Daniel’s story and what happens on the Tok'ra planet... yet they feel very connected and it feels very teamy, largely because both stories start off from the same point. They are intricately linked together and, later, they will merge back together too. It’s incredibly cleverly done.
                One thing about this episode is that we learnt quite a lot about the Tok’ra. We learn that they don’t have much in the way of weapons defence and it cements the idea that they are essentially a reclusive race who would rather fight with stealth and subterfuge than outright war. In fact, what they propose to do here – create enough symbiote poison to wipe out all the goa’ulds – is incredibly bold and radical for them. Not to mention risky for themselves and somewhat immoral.
                We also touch a little on the ethical dilemma Daniel faces in releasing this poison. At one point in the episode it is mentioned that this poison will not only kills symbiotes but, by association it kills the host and will wipe out Jaffa too. Hardly any wonder they Tok’ra and Jaffa go their own ways in later seasons. It’s very significant that Daniel is willing to deliver this poison knowing of the death it will ultimately unleash and he does so with very little soul searching (although an attempt is made in the episode to portray that).
                And then, of course, there’s the whole situation with Lantash. Did the Tok’ra really sacrifice the host to learn more about zatarcs? It certainly adds to the air of moral ambiguity that the Tok’ra always seem to portray. Generally I love Tok’a episodes for this very reason; they are a race that are extremely complex and with plenty depth of character.
                Sam is really frustrated with how she sees Martouf has been treated. Up until now she’s been largely trusting and open minded about the Tok’ra but here I get the sense that she’s starting to question their motivations; she’s starting to think like Jack about them. That’s not necessarily his attitude rubbing off on her as her discovering this through her own experiences. The implication is that, regardless sof the fact that Martouf probably would have wanted it this way, they Tok’ra did sacrifice the host for the sake of research and the survival of the symbiote. Their priorities are fairly clear and, as Jack puts if later in the series “we are just a nice place to live”.
                Of course that is all complicated by the possible feelings that Sam may have had for Martouf. Up until this point it seems that she was merely friendly with him; that he was another suitor who liked her more than she liked him. But at this point is seems that perhaps there was potential romantic notions developing for Sam. This is given fruition in an AU which we get a glimpse of in Ripple Effect. All this becomes a lot more pertinent in part 2 so I’ll leave it there for now.

                Sam and Jack

                There’s very little overtly shippy in this episode. It’s nice to see the easy relationship Jack has with Jacob, and it was Jack who commented on Sam’s attempt and “Yu” humour near the start but, other than that it’s pretty much all business for them. Not surprisingly because the situation they are in provides very little opportunity to explore anything deeper.
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                  Summit

                  Generally...


                  It is a little difficult to review this in isolation to The Last Stand and so I'm going to save most of my comments for it but I did just want to comment on the plot of killing the Goa'uld system lords with the poison...

                  It is a radical change of plan for the Tok'ra who do prefer slow and subtefuge over direct action. In many ways though it shows how they think bigger in scale and picture than the Tau'ri. When the Tok'ra come up with a plan its one that will deal a killing blow to all Goa'uld in a real plan, not just knocking them off one by one more by accident than grand design as the Tau'ri have been doing. I think it's a subtle emphasis of the difference between the two which contribute later to the cracks in the relationship.

                  I also think it shows the Tok'ra's ruthlessness coming out again in terms of collateral damage. In JM/TDYK, they were happy to sacrifice SG1, Jacob/Selmak, Martouf/Lantash in order to deal with Sokar. Here they are content to sacrifice the hosts (who admittedly as Jacob comments have been suffering under the possession of the symbiotes for centuries anyway and so this may be the Tok'ra reconciling this as euthanisia). Moreover they don't seem to have considered the threat to the Jaffa from the poison (a theme that will later come to fruition in Allegiance and Death Knell) although the lack of Jaffa at the Summit would perhaps confirm this is the best time to use it with minimum casualties.

                  The scene between Daniel and Teal'c is the nod to Daniel's conscience here and the fact that out of all of our erstwhile team he is the least likely to morally sanction what is assassination with multiple casualties. However, Daniel did once shoot up a tank of infant Goa'uld, and while I think he had by this point lost the anger that drove that action, I think he's still resolute in believing that the Goa'uld as a race should be destroyed - it's more the host aspect I think he has issues with - something that plays out when Sarah arrives.

                  Sam & Jack

                  I only see professionalism here between the two of them with not a suggestion of anything else. In regards to Martouf and Sam...

                  I don't necessarily agree that Sam's upset here is because of any romantic feelings for Martouf, either latent or manifest. I think she's upset because he was her friend and she cared about him, that he had confessed feelings for her just before his death, that he effectively died at her hand - and that there had been a promise of sharing the info on the za'tarc's which had not been kept, that they had apparently revived Martouf/Lantash or they had survived post the "death" in the gateroom to be placed in stasis, that they then had sacrificed the host to save the symbiote. It's a cauldron of frustration and guilt and responsibility above anything else for me in the way Sam responds to the whole situation. I think the more interesting aspect of this comes in the next episode with Lantash...

                  I also think that in the universe where Sam and Martouf got together, things transpired very differently - probably around JM/TDYK which is when I think Sam effectively and subconsciously made her choice between Jack and Martouf for me.
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                    Forgive me for backtracking to 48 Hours, but I'm behind and trying to get caught up.

                    Rewatching this episode this afternoon, I realized how much I really like this episode. Although the team is not together, they all have some great interaction with a lot of interesting secondary characters. If fact with so many additional characters involved here it would be easy for the whole thing to get convoluted and unwieldy. But each of the additional characters bring something relevant to the story and the script stays focused on the main plot point, which is getting Teal'c out of the gate in one piece.

                    The one disappointment I have is that I find the end of Tanith rather anticlimactic. I know that the production was constrained because of the actor playing Tanith was unwilling to come back for what the franchise could afford (they actually CGI'ed his face onto another body in the cockpit of the Alkesh at the beginning), but after building up such an intensely hostile rivalry between them I can't help but be disappointed. Tanith was really Teal'c greatest foe IMO. While his fight against Apophis and the goa'uld is philosphical and political; his animosity toward Tanith is deeply personal. Tanith killed his love.

                    So let me tie this into Sam and Jack's relationship. While Jack complains about the "damn Jaffa revenge thing" I think on a certain level he also understands it (he was the first one to note Teal'c's attachment to Shaun'oc) and identifies with it. When he has the goa'uld/Conrad down in the cell he expresses his complete lack of regaurd for killing the host because of what he intended to do to Sam. I think there was even some regret that it wasn't necessary to follow through on his threat. I think there was a part of Jack at that moment that would have gone in on the whole Jaffa revenge thing.

                    I have to take a moment to mention the wonderful performance of Don S. Davis throughout this episode. I think Hammond's strength of character and compassionate leadership were just brilliantly showcased here. My favorite scene is probably when Hammond says he has to resume gate operations and if he were to resign he would have no control an hour from then. You think he's telling Sam it's time to give it up, but then he says "Will that be enough time?" I just want to reach out and hug him. He's willing to end his career if there is any chance it will save one of his people.

                    As for Carter and McKay, I don't really see any sexual tension here. I get a lot of professional tension and I think McKay's remarks about how atractive he finds Sam are really just extension of his own professional ego. He obviously gets a rise from arguing physics with her on a level he probably can't with anyone else, and he assumes that she must get how smart (he believes) he is and therefore should find him attractive. I think Sam just finds him annoying at first and downright distasteful as there interactions continue.

                    In contrast I feel she prefers her interactions with Jack, who is able to assist her on many occassions in making the connections she's missing; who respects her intelligence and her intuision. In turn I think she also respects him (and knows he's smarter than he lets on).

                    As for the control room scene you can really see how distressed Sam is. (She is talking much faster than usual and I can't blame Jack for not entirely keeping up.) He tries his usual antics to distract her and help her to lighten up and relieve some stress, but it just doesn't work. I think in part, because Jack is also very concerned and having a hard time maintaining his casual persona. I don't see anything overtly shippy in this scene but I do get a real sense of commraderie, which I think carries through to the scene in the gate room at the end wher they go together to welcome Teal'c back to the physical world. (And yes you have to love Jack's concern for Sam, and the way he brushes off Siler ("Shake it off Sparky.").)

                    Comment


                      Originally posted by hlndncr View Post
                      The one disappointment I have is that I find the end of Tanith rather anticlimactic. I know that the production was constrained because of the actor playing Tanith was unwilling to come back for what the franchise could afford (they actually CGI'ed his face onto another body in the cockpit of the Alkesh at the beginning), but after building up such an intensely hostile rivalry between them I can't help but be disappointed. Tanith was really Teal'c greatest foe IMO. While his fight against Apophis and the goa'uld is philosphical and political; his animosity toward Tanith is deeply personal. Tanith killed his love.

                      So let me tie this into Sam and Jack's relationship. While Jack complains about the "damn Jaffa revenge thing" I think on a certain level he also understands it (he was the first one to note Teal'c's attachment to Shaun'oc) and identifies with it. When he has the goa'uld/Conrad down in the cell he expresses his complete lack of regaurd for killing the host because of what he intended to do to Sam. I think there was even some regret that it wasn't necessary to follow through on his threat. I think there was a part of Jack at that moment that would have gone in on the whole Jaffa revenge thing.
                      I just wanted to comment on this bit: for the Jaffa, I kind of see the Jaffa revenge/vengeance is a part of their justice system. You kill someone - their next of kin is perfectly entitled to track you down and kill you. You hurt someone - they are perfectly entitled to track you down and hurt you. For me, that it is part of the Jaffa justice system is why Teal'c so readily acquiesced to cor-ai back in S1. He had killed the father and so the son was entitled to his vengeance in killing Teal'c. (Which is why I agree that its such a shame that the final showdown between Teal'c and Tanith is so quick and limited to a scene. If the actor could no longer appear there was a ready solution - Tanith could have found a new host.) I don't think anyone outside of the Jaffa on the show actually ever *gets* this fundamental aspect of Jaffa culture - not even Daniel.

                      I think what Jack understands and gets even more than the others (and I guess I'm thinking of Daniel vs Apophis here) is the powerful emotions - the fierce anger and desire for retribution of a wounded warrior that underscore Jaffa revenge and trigger action to take it - because he feels them too - Red Sky being one example, Entity actually being another (in my mind Jack would have followed through with his threat if he had been given the opportunity to do so), and with Conrad, Jack feels the same anger although I think had he shot Conrad in DM that would have been heat of the moment Jaffa revenge for kidnapping Sam whereas in 48 Hours, the anger and desire have been sublimated more into a completely rational and cold lack of concern for the host given his previous actions.
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                        The Last Stand

                        Thanks to Cags for her expert analysis of part 1

                        Synopsis

                        Osiris recognises Daniel but he’s able to administer the memory drug and all is well. He discovers she represents Anubis. He can’t kill the System lords off because there would be no balance of power. The Goa’uld decide to re-admit Anubis into the fold (are they mad –he’s an evil chappy). Meanwhile back on the planet it’s a full frontal attack by Zipacna on behalf of Anubis. Many Tokra are killed and Lieutenant Elliot – poor chap on his first mission - is critically injured. Teal’c & Jack use the crystals to rescue Sam & Lieutenant Elliot/Lantash. Daniel escapes to the cargo ship after a bit of a fight with Osiris & Yu. They eventually get to the surface, Sam contacts her Dad and he comes and rescues them, after crashing into the planet. The Gate is jammed to the gills with Jaffa so Lieutenant Elliot offers to keep the poison with him therefore killing the enemy Jaffa.

                        Favourite line

                        Dr. Daniel Jackson:Yeah, you would think that a race smart enough to fly around in space would be smart enough to have seat belts.
                        Jacob Carter:I just prefer not to crash.

                        Analysis
                        I really like these two episodes. The insights in into Goa'uld life are interesting. The human servants actually believe the Goa’uld are all something to look up to and they actually desire a symbiote. We also find out what happens to all the left over symbiotes - yeuk. We get more of an image of the Tok’ra and all their odd self-centred ways. I did like scenes with Sam and Lantash, she must have felt so guilty and hopefully was able to sort of sort things out in her head. I agree that I don’t think it was a romantic thing. There were quite touching moments at the end between them and also slight nod to Elliott from Jack.

                        Apparently this was a tie up loose ends episode explaining the Tok’ra being decimated and the clearing up of Sam/Lantash thing.

                        Shippiness
                        Still searching for that – all offers greatly received! As mentioned before a professional job by SG1 - no opportunity for any shippiness.

                        Comment


                          Fluffy I think you should be given the shippiest heavy episode of season 6 because of all you've endured in season 5. I feel like a ship in dry dock here. I'm dying of thirst.

                          So I hope it's not cheating to give my thoughts on Summit and Last Stand together. I tried to watch them separately, but there's such a dirth of shippiness in either, and what I have to say about one really also applies to the other.

                          I guess these episodes are interesting for the insights they give us into Tok'ra strategy and Goa'uld power structure, but I was just never hugely interested. It does give us our introduction to Ba'al, which does prove hugely important in later years.

                          I do always love to see Jacob, and the dynamic between him and the team is priceless. Here we have more interaction between Jacob and Daniel then we've ever seen before, and I noticed that several times Jacob refers to him as "Danny." I've always considered Sam and Daniel's relationship as that of close sibblings. Here I feel Jacob is acknowleding that to him, SG1 are all his kids.

                          Jacob and Jack's relationship is slightly more complicated because I believe he is aware of Jack's feelings for Sam, or at least has his suspicions. When Jacob greats the incoming SG teams he hugs his daughter and gives Jack (future son-in-law?) a firm and friendly handshake. (OK, maybe I'm reading too much into it, but I'm desperate here!) And it's interesting that when Sam makes her "little joke" about Yu she looks to Jack for approval. Jack doesn't react particularly favorably, but come on, Dad is sitting right there. They don't show Jacob's reaction, but I have to wonder if he's not a little concerned about how much Jack's irreverance is rubbing off on his daughter.

                          In Sam's interactions with Elliot I see another way in which Jack has rubbed off on her. Her encouragement to Elliot not to give up ("We go through the gate; get into trouble; get out of it, and go home.") reminds me of how Jack would encourage her to keep going in the early years. You can see her attachment to Elliot as one of her new recruits she helped train, and their's a sort of tender, motherliness to her care for him.

                          Sam's relationships are an important part of these episodes. Once again we have an alien devoted to her who is willing to die to save her life. (Poor Sam just can't catch a break this season; one dead boyfriend after another; even ones who come back from the dead, just to die again. Poor girl.)

                          In the whole Sam/Martouf/Lantash relationship it is interesting that Sam felt closest to Martouf, whereas it was Lantash I think who was able to better see Sam for herself rather than an extension of Jolinar. But then Sam's reaction to Lantash's declaration of love for her suggests that she really can't believe that his feelings could be just for her and not have something to do with Jolinar.

                          Sam's upset at the Tok'ra for choosing to save the symbiote over the host could have several root causes IMO. Most of Sam's interactions were with Martouf; we only see her interact directly with Lantash twice IIRC. In the Tok'ra part 1 Lantash takes over when Martouf becomes too emotional to continue, and in Serpant's Song he gives the whole team a tongue lashing for not sending Apophis through the gate to Sokar. It's not surprising then that she doesn't feel a real warmth for him. It might also be disturbing for her because she is left wondering what choice might have been made if it had been her and Jolinar, or what if it came down to a choice between her father and Selmak? Then there is perhaps some resentment over the zatarc research, which was mentioned, and that was probably being conducted by Anise. (OK, here I may reading way too much into this again.) Sam probably didn't know Anise made a play for Jack, but she did know she and Martouf were constantly at odds, and the entire zatarc incident left her both emotionally and even professionally vulnerable. It's possible that she could be voicing some latent resentment that she is subconsciously channelling into her disapproval of the Tok'ra's treatment of Martouf.

                          I don't think any of this changes Jack and Sam's relationship per se. But it does leave Sam even more emotionally tangled, and feeds on her fears of intimacy that contribute to keeping Sam and Jack apart for so long.

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                            The thing I noticed most about these episodes during the rewatch was how bad the Tok'ra are during battle. When the Jaffa were trying to infiltrate their camp, the Tok'ra seemed to just throw themselves in the line of fire down the tunnels, and considering how their symbiotes are great at healing, they all die rather quickly (Jacob/Selmak are prime example of the opposite of this).

                            Other than that, no matter how many times I watch, I still feel disappointed over Elliott's death. He had the makings of a good character, and after all the attention they made of him during Proving Ground, it was somewhat a let down to get rid of him. Especially as the other one (whose name escapes me right now) seems to pop up in later episodes... Grogan was it?

                            That being said, I'm not sure any other character could have pulled off the whole Lantash/Martouf conversations with Sam in quite the same way. There was a certain level of compassion and tenderness between the two that seemed to work IMO, and not in an overly sexual kind of way that would threaten the whole S/J relationship. The friendship that Sam had built up with Elliott, be it somewhat in a respecting superior kind of way, seemed to resonate with the relationship between Lantash and Sam. Their connection was only made through the sharing of Jolinar's memories, and in struggling to separate the emotions from her own, respect for the symbiote had been a key part that had shone through.

                            This is also the one thing I love about her relationship with Jack - above all they had a deep respect for each other which is hard to ignore.

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                              The Last Stand

                              Generally...


                              I think it's a nice contrast to the first episode in that, we started with the Tok'ra finally taking action, and yet here not only is their own plan defunct because of the arrival of Anubis on the scene, but rather than striking a blow at the Goa'uld, they suffer a major loss in losing their base.

                              I agree actually that the Tok'ra seem ill prepared for the assault - but I tend to think its because their usual modus operandus is to run not fight. They're very much against direct confrontation.

                              Sam & Jack

                              Again, the focus here is on the professional rather than the personal, although I think there are a couple of moments - one when Sam is trapped with Elliot in the corridor collapse, and a couple where you see him looking over at her and Elliot with concern in his eyes (particularly in the final scene although there he very much stands back and lets Jacob be the one to comfort her) which while I think some of it is for Elliot's situation, I think a lot of it is for how the situation (Lantash's possession of Elliot) may be affecting Sam.

                              Ah, Lantash. I liked you so much better than Martouf, and here is why: because I think Lantash *did* separate Sam and Jolinar so much quicker than Martouf, and I think Lantash was the first of the pair to actually start to fall in love with *Sam*. I actually think Lantash, in another host, would have been a good other for Sam.

                              I don't see, however, in Sam's response any reciprocation of Lantash's feelings for her. I think she had already reconciled her own feelings for Martouf/Lantash as friendship even before the za'tarc incident, and so Lantash's declaration is an uncomfortable acknowledgement of feelings she doesn't return. Moreover, they are shared via a host with whom Sam has a professional relationship where she is a senior officer - and that's just awkward knowing that Elliot, a junior officer, is now aware through Lantash of not only the symbiote's feelings for her but all the interactions she had with Martouf/Lantash. Added to which, Elliot and Lantash's sacrifice to save SG1 and Jacob/Selmak by killing the invading Jaffa with the symbiote poison, is yet another example of someone sacrificing themselves for her (Orlin had already done this, Joe had done this, and while Narim's sacrifice was more about his world than for her personally it was another example of someone she cared about dying). It's no wonder Sam feared that loving someone inevitably meant losing them.
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                                I hate to just drop this and run (especially as I haven't had time to contribute to the discussions the last few days anyway), but I'm off on holiday tomorrow morning for two weeks. Still, here is the next write-up, a weeny bit early, and I will be back in July to join in the discussions for the end of the season.



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                                Synopsis

                                An amateur astronomer notices a large object in the sky, which turns out to be a sizable asteroid on collision course with Earth. The Asgard refuse to help, because the Protected Planets Treaty means they cannot help prevent natural disasters, so SG1 is called upon for some thrilling heroics. This involves reviving a crashed cargo ship on Revanna, flying it back through hyperspace to the solar system, landing on the asteroid, planting a nuke and then getting the heck out of there before it becomes too late to divert said asteroid away from the earth and impending nuclear winter and end of life as we know it. Of course, because this is SG1, plans 1 and 2 fail. There's meteor showers and hull breaches and hiding in escape pods, and then to top it all, the asteroid turns out not to be of the regular, iron and nickel variety, but instead is super naquadah-enhanced and therefore would go nova with the application of a naquadah-enhanced warhead. This leads SG1 to conclude that it is not a crazy random happenstance, but that there is a pesky Goa'uld behind it. It is probably now too late to get the Asgard to do their deus ex machina thing, so Jack and Teal'c head back out to the bomb to defuse it. Of course, it turns out that the bomb has been very poorly designed, with no red wire to cut, so Jack has to cut each one in turn. Luckily he picks the right wires to cut, so there's no massive explosion and burning atmosphere or boiling seas, but now the asteroid has passed the fail safe point and collision looks certain. Until SG1 come up with one of their patented wacky plans and fly the asteroid through the Earth by jumping into hyperspace. Another apocalypse averted.

                                Review

                                Rather like Exodus, I really really like this episode but can't help mentally rolling my eyes at how so many things go wrong, one after the other, to ramp up the tension. So we don't just have a straightforward tale of an asteroid on collision course with the earth, we have to also have hull breaches from meteors and a poorly designed bomb, just to make things harder for our heroes. The plot may be rather contrived, but the premise is great and it's done in style, with some really great lines and some lovely shots, particularly when Jack and Teal'c go EVA - all those gorgeous reflections in the isors, and the dreamlike quality of the sound and movement, and those beautiful earthrise shots. It's always fab to see SG1 doing their thing, saving the world unbeknownst to everyone down on Earth. And there's a real poignancy to the scenes back at the SGC, as Hammond and the others wait helplessly - in particular I have to highlight Don S. Davis's amazingly subtle and heartwrenching portrayal of the moment when they think sG1 has crashed into the asteroid.

                                Another thing I love about this episode is the complete lack of help from our advanced alien allies - it's a real hark-back to the early days of SG1 when only their resourcefulness could save the day. The Asgard continue their remakable haughtiness (sometimes I think it's only because Thor likes Jack that the Earth ever gets any help from those guys ), and the Tok'ra continue to be basically aloof, although of course they do turn up right at the end to give our guys a ride home.

                                It's basically a standalone episode, but nonetheless it does fit in to the overall picture at this point where Anubis is starting to make his presence known but hasn't really become the Big Bad properly yet.

                                Implications for Sam and Jack

                                On the one hand, not much, but on the other hand, in the middle of a season where we (even we!) so often struggle to find ship, there are a lot of really lovely moments here. This is really an episode that showcases how well SG1 work together and understand each other, and Sam and Jack's interactions here are very comfortable. There's that great shot, early on when they're on Revanna trying to fix the cargo ship, where Sam peers over Jack's shoulder, clearly curious as to what he's looking at so intently (Jack being such a noted expert in Goa'uld technology). He glares at her briefly and then as he turns back to whatever he's examining and Sam moves away, she actually rolls her eyes. It's a very little thing, but it's so, just comfortable. Then of course there's Jack's reactions to Sam getting hurt - he jumps to her aid when she falls, almost cradling her (the way she looks up at him reinforces this - it's actually really quite a tender moment), and then when they go to suit up to go EVA and Sam has a funny turn Jack is there straight away, again touching her, not just by her side. He drops his hands pretty fast when he realises she's not actually going to fall, but still, the naturalness with which he touches her is unusual for them, I think. As to why they're so unusually touchy-feely, perhaps it's because they've just spent nine days holed up in a cargo ship together, perhaps it's because they're kind of isolated, just SG1 on their own in space and so it seems less dangerous? I don't know, but I like it
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