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    #31
    Originally posted by P-90_177 View Post
    *Facepalm*
    A man telling another man he loves them is not a sign of homosexuality. I am (mostly) straight. I still love my brother or my best mate. The sooner men realise that the word "love" needn't have any connotation towards sexuality the better off the world will be.
    i "love" even so long ago now.. nearly all the men and women i served with in the army, especially those that hard times were spent with

    those are bonds that can never really be explained..actually "love" is to shallow a word.. anyhow

    yeah, but I dont say to or about them things like "your strange beautiful face" or " i spend my nights dreaming about you" to any of them, male or female

    to reiterate I DONT CARE EITHER WAY, it just does not fit the Trek mold

    and, again, if this scene--same words, same setting, were in TNG or those TNG films, i would have received it has platonic

    but with the over all feel and style of PICARD, it comes across as romantic

    just my opinion! And, as a fellow sci fi fan-- I love you

    Comment


      #32
      Originally posted by cosmichobo View Post
      Fully flesh androids - that point actually stuck out for me from the beginning. But - if you think about it... An android is a robot with a human appearance, able to replicate human functions/etc. We as the human species have typically - such as Data - perceived androids as being "mechanical men". But if the technology existed to make those androids out of flesh... wouldn't that just be the highest level of android?

      Would Data have died from a broach to the eye? Probably not, as it probably wouldn't have penetrated his metal head. However these new "androids" were flesh, so if the broach went through the eye socket and into what was presumably a flesh brain...
      ahh. so, they are nuBSG skinjobs! hey, i got the same feel for them. in fact, making it even more derivative of nuBSG- one of my favorite shows BTW-- was the talk of Synths coming in the time before and coming again destroyed their organic creators in a defensive rebellion

      "all this has happened before and will happen again"
      Last edited by magi877; April 22, 2020, 05:20 PM.

      Comment


        #33
        Wheel turns. Civilisations arise. Wheel turns. Civilisations fall.


        Picard - the series - felt more "Trek" to me than Discovery, though that's perhaps purely because it featured Patrick Stewart (and I'm a TNG/DS9/VOY guy). I completely get your comment RE aspects of Picard not belonging to the Trek universe - swearing, the level of violence (to some degree - that eyeball cutting scene still gripes me), and sexuality. But, Trek was not entirely platonic. Right from Farpoint it's established that Riker and Troi were ex lovers, and there is at times very non platonic stuff going on. It isn't, for example, as platonic as Classic Who, which very specifically aimed to stamp out anything sexual.

        Ultimately television has evolved since the 80's and 90's. Perhaps if Burman had realised this even back at the turn of the century, Enterprise may have lasted longer.

        (All that said - as a long time Doctor Who fan, it doesn't stop me bitching about "NuWHO" vs "Classic Who"... )
        as seen on YouTube - thecosmichobo
        "How Doomsday Should Have Ended!" • "Bigger on the Inside?" • "The Doctor Falls - With Hartnell!"
        "The War Games - In 10 Minutes" • "Announcement of Jon Pertwee's death" •
        and lots more!

        Comment


          #34
          Originally posted by aretood2 View Post
          Picard: The Federation has lost its way.
          *Sisko reappears*
          Sisko: I have returned and brought the message of peace, love, diversity, compassion and acceptance from the Prophets
          Random Starfleet Admiral With a Suspiciously V Ridged forehead: Quick! Kill it! Kill it with fire!!!


          I would really love to see the return of Captain Sisko in some form. But I really don't see how they would incorporate the wormhole with Picard. There'd have to be some sort of personal connection with either him or his new crew.

          I can see, however, if they Janeway showing up if they continue the Borg sideplot.
          Sisko as an envoy of peace and diplomacy reminds me of the "Kirk" line in the "Star Trekkin'" parody where he's like "We come in peace...shoot to kill"

          Comment


            #35
            Originally posted by magi877 View Post
            which creepy incest thing?

            seriously, you didn't hear "your strange beautiful face i never told you that..." data- "that you loved me?" picard " i spend every night dreaming about you?"
            I say things like "I love you" to a sixty something year old man, that man is my dad. Take out that context, and I guess you can make it out to be anything other than the love of a son for his father.

            Originally posted by magi877 View Post
            i "love" even so long ago now.. nearly all the men and women i served with in the army, especially those that hard times were spent with

            those are bonds that can never really be explained..actually "love" is to shallow a word.. anyhow

            yeah, but I dont say to or about them things like "your strange beautiful face" or " i spend my nights dreaming about you" to any of them, male or female

            to reiterate I DONT CARE EITHER WAY, it just does not fit the Trek mold

            and, again, if this scene--same words, same setting, were in TNG or those TNG films, i would have received it has platonic

            but with the over all feel and style of PICARD, it comes across as romantic

            just my opinion! And, as a fellow sci fi fan-- I love you
            And that's the thing. I can see TNG context in those lines, so I see it as platonic, the whole idea of something else just didn't cross my mind at all due to all the baggage from TNG.

            Originally posted by cosmichobo View Post
            Wheel turns. Civilisations arise. Wheel turns. Civilisations fall.


            Picard - the series - felt more "Trek" to me than Discovery, though that's perhaps purely because it featured Patrick Stewart (and I'm a TNG/DS9/VOY guy). I completely get your comment RE aspects of Picard not belonging to the Trek universe - swearing, the level of violence (to some degree - that eyeball cutting scene still gripes me), and sexuality. But, Trek was not entirely platonic. Right from Farpoint it's established that Riker and Troi were ex lovers, and there is at times very non platonic stuff going on. It isn't, for example, as platonic as Classic Who, which very specifically aimed to stamp out anything sexual.

            Ultimately television has evolved since the 80's and 90's. Perhaps if Burman had realised this even back at the turn of the century, Enterprise may have lasted longer.

            (All that said - as a long time Doctor Who fan, it doesn't stop me bitching about "NuWHO" vs "Classic Who"... )
            This is only tangentially related to what you said, but I must express myself in that I don't agree with people who say that the Federation as depicted in Picard isn't compatible with the Federation in TNG/DS9/VOY and therefore this isn't "trekkie" enough. Take the abandoning of the Romulans...I distinctly remember a witch hunt in TNG where an Admiral went after a crewman because they had a small fraction of Romulan blood, not to mention that that guy felt the need to hide that part of his heritage in order to get into the Academy which implies discrimination takes place against anyone who has one great grandparent who belongs to the "wrong" race. Before the Breen attack, an Admiral during the run up to the Dominion War attempted to launch a coup against the President, imagine attitudes after the Breen Attack on Earth...or Admiral Cartwright who wanted to kill the Federation President (Along with the Klingon Chancellor). Another admiral wanted to violate the Federation's treaty with the Romulan Star Empire regarding cloaking devices. Then there's Section 31 and it's genocidal tendencies regarding the founders of which Admiral Ross was complacent (And who knows what else Section 31 is capable of).

            The writers of DS9 wanted to have Vulcan leave the Federation during the run up of the Dominion war too! So it's not too hard to imagine that the Federation devoting so many resources to a "wrong race" would cause some worlds to stump their feet. And Admiral Clancy (Who I'm convinced served on the Enterprise) dropping an F-Bomb is a whole level less worrisome than treasonous/genocidal admirals. Speaking of genocidal admirals, wasn't that one admiral in Insurrection also willing to allow to either displace or kill of a world's population in the name of his personal ambition?

            I guess when Picard became an Admiral he was the odd man out...no wonder he felt that it stopped being Starfleet. Now if only Admiral Janeway was there....She'd probably retired just like Picard to be honest.

            Also, one thing that bugged me. 90s trek did use "synthetic lifeform" (of which Synth is a logical colloquialism) and I do believe that Data himself was referred as that.
            By Nolamom
            sigpic


            Comment


              #36
              Originally posted by aretood2 View Post
              I say things like "I love you" to a sixty something year old man, that man is my dad. Take out that context, and I guess you can make it out to be anything other than the love of a son for his father.



              And that's the thing. I can see TNG context in those lines, so I see it as platonic, the whole idea of something else just didn't cross my mind at all due to all the baggage from TNG.



              And Admiral Clancy (Who I'm convinced served on the Enterprise) dropping an F-Bomb is a whole level less worrisome than treasonous/genocidal admirals. Speaking of genocidal admirals, wasn't that one admiral in Insurrection also willing to allow to either displace or kill of a world's population in the name of his personal ambition?
              [/COLOR]
              I guess when Picard became an Admiral he was the odd man out...no wonder he felt that it stopped being Starfleet. Now if only Admiral Janeway was there....She'd probably retired just like Picard to be honest.

              Also, one thing that bugged me. 90s trek did use "synthetic lifeform" (of which Synth is a logical colloquialism) and I do believe that Data himself was referred as that.
              yes!! Clancy was a helmsman I believe --- I know she was in TNG The Emissary where we see Ambassador K'Ehleyr introduced

              but the character was played by 2 diff actresses in TNG and PICARD

              Simply saying "i love you" means far less then preambling it with "your strange beautiful face. i never told you that ..." and following it with "i dream about you every night"

              taken in the context shown on screen ALONG with the tone of the series... many take it as romantic

              Comment


                #37
                Originally posted by cosmichobo View Post
                Wheel turns. Civilisations arise. Wheel turns. Civilisations fall.


                Picard - the series - felt more "Trek" to me than Discovery, though that's perhaps purely because it featured Patrick Stewart (and I'm a TNG/DS9/VOY guy). I completely get your comment RE aspects of Picard not belonging to the Trek universe - swearing, the level of violence (to some degree - that eyeball cutting scene still gripes me), and sexuality. But, Trek was not entirely platonic. Right from Farpoint it's established that Riker and Troi were ex lovers, and there is at times very non platonic stuff going on. It isn't, for example, as platonic as Classic Who, which very specifically aimed to stamp out anything sexual.

                Ultimately television has evolved since the 80's and 90's. Perhaps if Burman had realised this even back at the turn of the century, Enterprise may have lasted longer.

                (All that said - as a long time Doctor Who fan, it doesn't stop me bitching about "NuWHO" vs "Classic Who"... )
                i know i am in the minority here when i say this, but just about anything is more Trek then DISCOVERY.

                i agree wit your TNG romance points.. but those were usually always implied or talked about not shown. was it in DS9 where we first saw two characters in bed together? Maybe one of the films?

                Comment


                  #38
                  Originally posted by aretood2 View Post

                  This is only tangentially related to what you said, but I must express myself in that I don't agree with people who say that the Federation as depicted in Picard isn't compatible with the Federation in TNG/DS9/VOY and therefore this isn't "trekkie" enough. Take the abandoning of the Romulans...I distinctly remember a witch hunt in TNG where an Admiral went after a crewman because they had a small fraction of Romulan blood, not to mention that that guy felt the need to hide that part of his heritage in order to get into the Academy which implies discrimination takes place against anyone who has one great grandparent who belongs to the "wrong" race. Before the Breen attack, an Admiral during the run up to the Dominion War attempted to launch a coup against the President, imagine attitudes after the Breen Attack on Earth...or Admiral Cartwright who wanted to kill the Federation President (Along with the Klingon Chancellor). Another admiral wanted to violate the Federation's treaty with the Romulan Star Empire regarding cloaking devices. Then there's Section 31 and it's genocidal tendencies regarding the founders of which Admiral Ross was complacent (And who knows what else Section 31 is capable of).
                  All of those admirals you mentioned did betray their oath. But, if you look closely you will remember they all were either directly influenced by the actions of an enemy race or influenced by some other, outside influence

                  Adm Satie you referenced was not acting on orders of starfleet in her over the top investigation. yes, SF gave her authority but she ramped that up with her paranoia

                  Admiral Kirk did not lose his admiralty because he was following SF policy- he made a decision to do what he did

                  Through all of these Admiral issues, it was always shown that it was the actions of the admiral themselves and not starfleet policy that caused the disgrace

                  now though, in Picard and Discovery,we begin to see Starfleet itself has potentially being corrupt..and though i do not watch it, i have seen clips.. perhaps this will be a common touchstone if tptb's do link PICARD with the future Discovery has found itself in (vis a vis the much smaller starfleet)?

                  Comment


                    #39
                    Originally posted by magi877 View Post
                    yes!! Clancy was a helmsman I believe --- I know she was in TNG The Emissary where we see Ambassador K'Ehleyr introduced

                    but the character was played by 2 diff actresses in TNG and PICARD

                    Simply saying "i love you" means far less then preambling it with "your strange beautiful face. i never told you that ..." and following it with "i dream about you every night"

                    taken in the context shown on screen ALONG with the tone of the series... many take it as romantic
                    I can't actually find where I saw it now but I believe it's been confirmed that Admiral Clancy is not meant to be the Clancy seen in The Emissary.

                    But Picard does dream about him every night. That was all but confirmed in the first episode. And saying someone is beautiful doesn't mean anything. My mother is beautiful. I would describe a Jellyfish as strange and beautiful and honestly if if one could understand me I'd probably tell it so. Data was odd, and unique and Picard sees that, at the same time of being confronted with someone who he firmly sees as a man who was quite possibly one of his best friends and he never said so.

                    Originally posted by magi877 View Post
                    All of those admirals you mentioned did betray their oath. But, if you look closely you will remember they all were either directly influenced by the actions of an enemy race or influenced by some other, outside influence

                    Adm Satie you referenced was not acting on orders of starfleet in her over the top investigation. yes, SF gave her authority but she ramped that up with her paranoia

                    Admiral Kirk did not lose his admiralty because he was following SF policy- he made a decision to do what he did

                    Through all of these Admiral issues, it was always shown that it was the actions of the admiral themselves and not starfleet policy that caused the disgrace

                    now though, in Picard and Discovery,we begin to see Starfleet itself has potentially being corrupt..and though i do not watch it, i have seen clips.. perhaps this will be a common touchstone if tptb's do link PICARD with the future Discovery has found itself in (vis a vis the much smaller starfleet)?
                    Ok, that's fair enough. So let's talk about instances where Starfleet Officers betrayed their oath or were apparently corrupt or biased under either orders to do so or with the implicit understanding from their superiors that it is what they should do. Just off the top of my head:

                    Sisko briging the Romulans into the Dominion War by lying to a Romulan diplomat which was stated to have been approved by Starfleet.

                    Sisko telling Worf to stop Gowron from ruining the war under any means necessary. (It is implied heavily in the scene that Sisko is ok with Worf killing Gowron if that is what needs to happen)

                    Commander Hilliard (It's ok if you don't remember the name) going out of his way to tell Bashir that he is wrong to try to seek a cure for the Changeling disease when they are at war. Now yes he was also explaining why Bashir couldn't have access to the files he wanted to look for a cure but he could have just said they were classified and moved on. Instead he effectively berated Bashir for even attempting to look for a cure.

                    Admiral Ross assisting Section 31 in a plot against Romulan Senator Cretak and installing a Federation spy in the Romulan Senate.

                    The plot to assassinate Chancellor Gorkon and the Federation President... Now obviously this wasn't officially sanctioned, but I think it's still a clear indication of Federation corruption given how many Starfleet officers were involved including Fleet Admiral Cartwright, who then had people working for him as far down as the two Crewmen who carried out the assassination on Gorkon's ship.

                    I should point out that this is where Discovery fits in so well because not only does Discovery back up the case that Starfleet and the Federation will do some pretty terrible things in order to survive when pushed, but that Cartwright will have come from the generation that likely fought in the Klingon war that saw Starfleet almost lose, as well as all the subsequent years of near constant Federation and Klingon hostility. Hell in the first episode we see the Klingons in TOS Kirk has no interest in making peace. He wants to throw down. The Organians are the only ones who are adamant that the war cannot happen.

                    In other times and places we have Admiral Pressmen who while breaking the treaty of Algeron willingly points out to Riker that there were Admirals higher above him the chain that were backing him, and indeed there must have been given that he was just a captain when the Phase cloak was built. I honestly wouldn't be surprised if he got out of that situation with just a slap on the wrist for getting caught when the episode was done.

                    Admiral Necheyev also does some pretty shady stuff every time we see her, but most notably ordering Picard to remove the inhabitants of the Native American colony world to make room for the Cardasians. Hell that whole incident more or less sparked the whole Maquis movement in the first place.

                    And of course pretty much Starfleet's entire history with the Maquis, where they effectively spent 3-4 years hunting them down like dogs, for I admit logical purposes to keep the peace intact with the Cardassians who were the greater potential foe and the Maquis were resorting to terrorism, but it doesn't change the fact that Starfleet's actions towards their own civilians was still directly opposed to their core ideals. I mean Sisko destroyed an entire eco-system for one man.


                    Starfleet is seen as having elements of either corruption, or simply willing to betray their ideals, throughout the franchise. It seems to be a clear divide between the Cpatains who are out on the frontlines or on the frontier who uphold the ideals of the Federation, serve as the face of the Federation as it were, and the Admirals and politicians back at command who actually have to keep the whole thing holding together and that means resorting to some pretty dark stuff sometimes. Occasionally you have an Admiral like Picard, Owen Paris who clearly seem to uphold those ideals to their core. But they appear more to be the exception than the rule.


                    Also, it's worth pointing out again that Starfleet as depicted in Picard isn't shown as doing anything inherently corrupt or bad outside of Commodore Oh, who was a spy. Yes Starfleet refused to help the Romulans after Mars but the reasons given by Clancy are perfectly sound when you're trying to run a democratic superpower. The people were against it and they needed the resources to help their own over a power that was a rival up until very recently. Now that's not some grand beacon of hope but it is real politics. There is nothing in Picard that indicates that the rest of the actual Federation isn't the same utopian ideal we've always seen it to be. The only real things that are pointed out is that Starfleet has been less willing to aid the Romulans, which frankly based on the Prime Directive Starfleet withholds aid to others on a whim anyway, and they've had to draw their ships back off the frontier so that some nonaligned Worlds like Freecloud have become more lawless than they were before, but we have seen worlds in Star Trek before that appear to be seedy underbellies that Starfleet still comes and goes from freely such as in Unification and Gambit.
                    Please do me a huge favour and help me be with the love of my life.

                    Comment


                      #40
                      Originally posted by P-90_177 View Post
                      I can't actually find where I saw it now but I believe it's been confirmed that Admiral Clancy is not meant to be the Clancy seen in The Emissary.

                      But Picard does dream about him every night. That was all but confirmed in the first episode. And saying someone is beautiful doesn't mean anything. My mother is beautiful. I would describe a Jellyfish as strange and beautiful and honestly if if one could understand me I'd probably tell it so. Data was odd, and unique and Picard sees that, at the same time of being confronted with someone who he firmly sees as a man who was quite possibly one of his best friends and he never said so.



                      Ok, that's fair enough. So let's talk about instances where Starfleet Officers betrayed their oath or were apparently corrupt or biased under either orders to do so or with the implicit understanding from their superiors that it is what they should do. Just off the top of my head:

                      Sisko briging the Romulans into the Dominion War by lying to a Romulan diplomat which was stated to have been approved by Starfleet.

                      Sisko telling Worf to stop Gowron from ruining the war under any means necessary. (It is implied heavily in the scene that Sisko is ok with Worf killing Gowron if that is what needs to happen)

                      Commander Hilliard (It's ok if you don't remember the name) going out of his way to tell Bashir that he is wrong to try to seek a cure for the Changeling disease when they are at war. Now yes he was also explaining why Bashir couldn't have access to the files he wanted to look for a cure but he could have just said they were classified and moved on. Instead he effectively berated Bashir for even attempting to look for a cure.

                      Admiral Ross assisting Section 31 in a plot against Romulan Senator Cretak and installing a Federation spy in the Romulan Senate.

                      The plot to assassinate Chancellor Gorkon and the Federation President... Now obviously this wasn't officially sanctioned, but I think it's still a clear indication of Federation corruption given how many Starfleet officers were involved including Fleet Admiral Cartwright, who then had people working for him as far down as the two Crewmen who carried out the assassination on Gorkon's ship.

                      I should point out that this is where Discovery fits in so well because not only does Discovery back up the case that Starfleet and the Federation will do some pretty terrible things in order to survive when pushed, but that Cartwright will have come from the generation that likely fought in the Klingon war that saw Starfleet almost lose, as well as all the subsequent years of near constant Federation and Klingon hostility. Hell in the first episode we see the Klingons in TOS Kirk has no interest in making peace. He wants to throw down. The Organians are the only ones who are adamant that the war cannot happen.

                      In other times and places we have Admiral Pressmen who while breaking the treaty of Algeron willingly points out to Riker that there were Admirals higher above him the chain that were backing him, and indeed there must have been given that he was just a captain when the Phase cloak was built. I honestly wouldn't be surprised if he got out of that situation with just a slap on the wrist for getting caught when the episode was done.

                      Admiral Necheyev also does some pretty shady stuff every time we see her, but most notably ordering Picard to remove the inhabitants of the Native American colony world to make room for the Cardasians. Hell that whole incident more or less sparked the whole Maquis movement in the first place.

                      And of course pretty much Starfleet's entire history with the Maquis, where they effectively spent 3-4 years hunting them down like dogs, for I admit logical purposes to keep the peace intact with the Cardassians who were the greater potential foe and the Maquis were resorting to terrorism, but it doesn't change the fact that Starfleet's actions towards their own civilians was still directly opposed to their core ideals. I mean Sisko destroyed an entire eco-system for one man.


                      Starfleet is seen as having elements of either corruption, or simply willing to betray their ideals, throughout the franchise. It seems to be a clear divide between the Cpatains who are out on the frontlines or on the frontier who uphold the ideals of the Federation, serve as the face of the Federation as it were, and the Admirals and politicians back at command who actually have to keep the whole thing holding together and that means resorting to some pretty dark stuff sometimes. Occasionally you have an Admiral like Picard, Owen Paris who clearly seem to uphold those ideals to their core. But they appear more to be the exception than the rule.


                      Also, it's worth pointing out again that Starfleet as depicted in Picard isn't shown as doing anything inherently corrupt or bad outside of Commodore Oh, who was a spy. Yes Starfleet refused to help the Romulans after Mars but the reasons given by Clancy are perfectly sound when you're trying to run a democratic superpower. The people were against it and they needed the resources to help their own over a power that was a rival up until very recently. Now that's not some grand beacon of hope but it is real politics. There is nothing in Picard that indicates that the rest of the actual Federation isn't the same utopian ideal we've always seen it to be. The only real things that are pointed out is that Starfleet has been less willing to aid the Romulans, which frankly based on the Prime Directive Starfleet withholds aid to others on a whim anyway, and they've had to draw their ships back off the frontier so that some nonaligned Worlds like Freecloud have become more lawless than they were before, but we have seen worlds in Star Trek before that appear to be seedy underbellies that Starfleet still comes and goes from freely such as in Unification and Gambit.
                      yup, the behavior of large organizations,bureaucracies and of those in them, is often corrupted

                      but though I agree with you, I will still point out that every instance of corruption shown has been either due to individual paranoia, acting on their own-going rogue/ "i know how to do it better" or alien influence

                      even,as you said when several admirals are acting in cabal, they are still in the minority over all-- the obedient and faithful officers of SF always prevail!

                      most importantly, they are not following the official line of SF/FED. this is the diff between a rogue SF admiral going against policy by being genocidal or war mongering while a Klingon, Cardassian or Romulan officer doing the same would most likely be doing so in keeping with the official stance of their organizations

                      and of course, real world.. i think the introduction of the "rogue officer" all comes from the real world times of TOS. to dramatize the occurrence in reality of rogue officers in Vietnam and isolated corruption in govt and society at the time

                      all of our film and TNG/DS9 rogues are built upon this idea of Roddenberry's (who was a naval officer and probably had his own stories of bad officers) and evolved

                      i have not watched DISCOVERY save for a few clips, but it would appear to me that it is taking the direction away from rogues to one of portraying SF and the FED as doing something, as a organization, so terrible that in its future (the future after PICARD) that the entire A quadrant has turned against it.

                      that is why, i say **perhaps** TPTBs have used PICARD as an introductory vehicle to show us the beginnings of these negative organizational actions that brings upon the downfall whose aftermath is to be shown in this season of DISCOVERY

                      Comment


                        #41
                        Love the Picard season! I had no issue with the Data/Picard "I Love You" scene. Felt like a father/son vibe to me. My only issue was all the time spent grieving over Picard dying just for him to pop back up at the very end to say...."Just kidding!!" I mean actually to see now in retrospect his face coming together in the intro credits like a puzzle...I think I mentioned this somewhere else...may have been a foreshadowing. IDK but do we assume he's like an android now? Will he be able to die? Why did they have to actually kill (completely put that light out completely delete or whatever) Data? I think that was touching and all but I quite liked how Picard was able to dial him up!! It had a sort of Number Six/Baltar deal to it. Either way, can't wait for S2!
                        Originally posted by jelgate
                        This brings much pain but SQ is right

                        Comment


                          #42
                          Originally posted by magi877 View Post
                          man, those CGI smorgasbord of SF and Romulan ships!! So SW EP 9 of them

                          and, I thought it was said that the Androids on planet Coppertone were improved versions of Data?

                          Well, could the Data we know been "killed" by a brooch to the eye? hmmm?

                          And the revelations--- like all along Picard has been a homosexual mechanophiliac? and Soong had a real human child--how so when in TNG we saw where Soongs wife was not capable of birth- yes?

                          -----------------
                          not a bad show over all, I did enjoy it. but, it has Star Trek in its title and it really didn't live to that standard, did it?

                          kind of like loving nuBSG then cringing myself down to hell after watching "Battlestar Galactica;The Plan"

                          [ATTACH=CONFIG]43082[/ATTACH]
                          It clear Soong was supposed to be Lore in disguise, change at the last minute because they decided a new team of writers for season 2 would be brought in and they didn't want to carry on with the multi season long arc they had.

                          Comment


                            #43
                            Originally posted by EricG View Post
                            The touch screens in TNG looked futuristic and still don't seem dated.

                            TOS looked dated after a decade. Would have been great if they had Spacewar!

                            I don't think holographic interfaces will take off because they're not tactile. They just look cool.
                            In star trek universe they can be tactile. In the modern world, you can achieve the same with clever use of ultrasound. https://www.photonics.com/Articles/I...ves_and/a65303

                            Comment


                              #44
                              Originally posted by squirrely1 View Post
                              I liked the Picard series and thought it was well done for the most part. In watching the Easter Egg vid by Goldsman and Chabon they said there were no Easter Eggs in the beginning credits but seriously I always thought it was weird that the opening credits was actually the assembly of Picard from pieces like they were "putting him back together again" humpty dumpty style. Now after seeing the finale it makes sense. Before that I didn't really get that visual. I think that should be considered a huge easter egg or at least a foreshadowing.
                              I don't think that was a easter egg for him becoming a android.

                              It was him being rebuilt from a downtrodden, ignore , destroyed by politics, picard we got hints of in the first couple of episode. The one who lost hope in the federation, back into the captain we know an love on TNG.

                              Comment


                                #45
                                Originally posted by magi877 View Post
                                i agree wit your TNG romance points.. but those were usually always implied or talked about not shown. was it in DS9 where we first saw two characters in bed together? Maybe one of the films?
                                Plenty of beds were shared in The Next Generation.

                                There's Data with Tasha Yar. They cut the scene early, but not before showing Tasha Yar push Data onto the bed and explicitly talking about how the two were going to have sex:


                                https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=K0FVMHJReKk


                                -The Naked Now - Season 1, Episode 3.

                                You also have Riker with "Mistress" Beata, while wearing garb that exposes much of his chest:

                                https://vignette.wikia.nocookie.net/...path-prefix=en

                                -Angel One - "Season 1, Episode 14"

                                There's more with Riker. He playfully wrestles/makes out with an alien on Risa who gets him addicted to a game and he gets pushed onto a bed by Ro Laren.

                                For the others:
                                • Picard shares a sleeping bag with Vosh in "Captain's Holiday," leading to flirty banter, a make out session and implied sex, and in "Tapestry" he wakes up next to Q after having slept with Marta Batanideshes (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G_0dgKgSDgo). The conversation he has with Q about Martha is scripted so it can also sound like they are talking to each other for humorous purposes.
                                • Troi endures a fairly intense telepathic rape scene that happens in season 5: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EHVI4UHSm1U.
                                • Worf has that infamous "This is sex" line on the bridge of the Enterprise in season 1 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3hNMwxY4-Vk) and various other aggressive Klingon sexual encounters. Importantly, "this is sex" comes one episode after he and Riker discuss sex:
                                  WORF: I am not concerned with pleasure, Commander. I am a warrior.
                                  RIKER: Even Klingons need love now and then.
                                  WORF: For what we consider love, sir, I would need a Klingon woman.
                                  RIKER: What about plain old basic sex? You must have some need for that.
                                  WORF: Of course, but with the females available to me, sir, Earth females, I must restrain myself too much. They are quite fragile, sir.
                                  RIKER: Worf, if anyone else had said that, I'd suspect he was bragging.
                                • Doctor Crusher has sex with a ghost, not in a bed, but in a chair. This was in season 7's "Sub Rosa."


                                I'm not even a Star Trek fan (I haven't watched TNG since the 90s), so I'm sure there are more instances like these for anyone doing a rewatch to find.
                                Last edited by Xaeden; October 14, 2020, 04:53 PM.

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