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"Ick sprecken deutsch" or the ... interesting use of foreign languages in Grimm

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  • briangreen1984
    replied
    Great topic. I wonder, why didn't they use some German speaking person ? There are quite a few around. But at the same time, those semi-German words kinda did their job in providing sort of old European atmosphere.

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  • tenismenenedez
    replied
    Originally posted by Hyndara71 View Post
    Yeah, I'm pretty sure it's taken somewhere in Germany. My first thought was: "Frauenkirche?" (Munich) but the two buildings in front doesn't match. But definetely somewhere in southern Germany. I'm living in Northrhine-Westphalia in a pretty old town but the framework doesn't match - and that differs from region to region. But I doubt it's Heidelberg *shakes head*. It's years that I was there but again, framework doesn't match from what I have in mind.
    It's Hannover.

    http://grimm.wikia.com/wiki/Leave_It_to_Beavers

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  • Camira
    replied
    I dont't know if it's still interisting for you, the german town shown as Mannheim, is Hannover in Niedersachsen.

    Greetings from Germany,
    Camira

    Leave a comment:


  • Hyndara71
    replied
    Originally posted by mi_guard View Post
    but you still could 'hear' that it's not her mother tongue
    It takes nearly an entire life to loose completely those last remnants. Claire is "only" an actress, Mary McDonald (Frau Pech) is the language trainer and did her acting job more worst.

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  • mi_guard
    replied
    Originally posted by Hyndara71 View Post
    She did remarkable good, I was surprised how good.
    but you still could 'hear' that it's not her mother tongue

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  • Hyndara71
    replied
    She did remarkable good, I was surprised how good.

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  • peppersasen
    replied
    does anyone know if Claire Coffee (the girl who plays Adalind) speaks German IRL? her Musai episode dialog was a mouthful.

    acting in a language you don't speak. <--marketable skill. BOOYAH!

    Leave a comment:


  • mi_guard
    replied

    Leave a comment:


  • peppersasen
    replied
    was doing some research for a story i'm writing (not Grimm-related in any way) and came across this:
    The last two say:
    Germanic name element

    Ancient Germanic
    *-ber?? = (nomen agentis of) 'to help, to rescue' [1]
    *-berg? = (nomen agentis of) 'to help, to rescue' [1]
    Old Norse
    bjarga = 'to help, save, rescue' [1] [2]
    bj?rg = 'help, deliverance' [2] [3]
    -bj?rg = (nomen agentis of) 'to help, to rescue' [1]
    borg = 'stronghold, fortification, castle' [3]
    Old High German
    burg = 'fortification, castle, protection' [4]
    burg = 'stronghold, fortification, castle' [5]
    bergan = 'to help, to rescue' [6]
    Old Saxon
    burg = 'stronghold, fortification, castle' [7]
    borg = 'stronghold, fortification, castle' [5]
    Old English
    burh = 'fortress, fortified place' [8]
    And:
    Germanic name element

    Old Norse
    harðr = 'hard, strong' [1]
    h?rðr = 'hard' [2]
    Old High German
    harti = 'hard, strong'
    hard = 'hard, strong' [3]
    I am such a nerd for this kind of thing. OMG. OMG. OMG. Dorkgasm. LOL.

    Leave a comment:


  • CreaJoa
    replied
    Originally posted by Divinecoma View Post
    "Hallo, wie is daar" is indeed a strange way to answer to phone. I'd say it if I heard a noise in the dark or so.. As to it may be used in the 1950's, he was an older man, perhaps it's just the way he was taught? Then it would fit of course.
    Like I said...I never answer the phone like that and I don't know any "elder" people who do so. Well, at least it was Dutch..

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  • CreaJoa
    replied
    Originally posted by Hyndara71 View Post
    That is the first time I hear Grimm didn't did well in any country . Wow! Did they put in on the wrong timeslot? That's really weird!
    Ah, well, I'm not that lucky about the German dubbing (I think my opinion about that is very clear) and as much as I love Grimm I avoid watching it here on TV. Wrong voice-casting, bad translation, now the "corrections" *shakes head*. I'm really wondering what they can do to the show before the ratings are dropping in Germany
    I don't know anything about a wrong timeslot, it was broadcasted around 8 o'clock around here so that's not a bad time in my opinion. At least they don't dub here but just use subtitles.

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  • Divinecoma
    replied
    "Hallo, wie is daar" is indeed a strange way to answer to phone. I'd say it if I heard a noise in the dark or so.. As to it may be used in the 1950's, he was an older man, perhaps it's just the way he was taught? Then it would fit of course.

    Leave a comment:


  • Hyndara71
    replied
    That is the first time I hear Grimm didn't did well in any country . Wow! Did they put in on the wrong timeslot? That's really weird!
    Ah, well, I'm not that lucky about the German dubbing (I think my opinion about that is very clear) and as much as I love Grimm I avoid watching it here on TV. Wrong voice-casting, bad translation, now the "corrections" *shakes head*. I'm really wondering what they can do to the show before the ratings are dropping in Germany

    Leave a comment:


  • CreaJoa
    replied
    Well, they broadcasted season 1 and after that 2 episodes from season 2 and then abruptly stopped. I believe it's because of bad ratings. I found out that one episode just had 263.000 viewers. In a small country like the Netherlands even that is bad. Top programs for instance have 2 million viewers.

    Luckily I saw the episodes before the broadcasting even started here, but it is to bad for people who don't have the skills to watch it on the internet or just need the dutch subtitles to understand it all. Except for the Dutch, Flemish en German parts off course

    Leave a comment:


  • Hyndara71
    replied
    Mh, that's weird! Were the ratings down? Do you know that?

    Leave a comment:

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