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Mythology of the Stargate glyphs

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    Mythology of the Stargate glyphs

    I have found this old file on my winchester, so I will copy it here. These were all published on the Stargate : Command app. Maybe somebody will be interested to read it. Have fun.

    https://stargate.fandom.com/wiki/Glyph

    Glyph 2 - CRATER
    Name and meaning:
    In Greek mythology, Crater represents the Cup of Apollo – the god of the skies – which is due to its chalice-like configuration. The cup is being held up by the Raven – Corvus – another figure in Greek mythology. The tale, much like many mythological stories, is a sad one, and begins with the Raven being sent to fetch water for his master, Apollo.

    Unfortunately, Corvus (the Raven) was distracted as he became tempted by a fig, and then waited too long for it to ripen. When he realized his mistake, he returned sorrowfully to Apollo with his cup (Crater) and brought along the serpent Hydra in his claws as well. Angry, Apollo tossed all three into the sky for all eternity, where they became part of the starry firmament.

    * * *

    Resources :

    https://www.universetoday.com/20543/...-constellation
    http://www.derekscope.co.uk/constellation-20th/crater
    http://www.constellation-guide.com/c...-constellation
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Crater_(constellation)
    https://www.britannica.com/place/Crater-constellation
    http://www.constellationsofwords.com...ns/Crater.html
    https://www.astronomytrek.com/star-c...n-facts-crater
    http://rdanderson.com/stargate/glyphs/glyphs.htm
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stargate_(device)


    Glyph 3 – VIRGO
    Name and meaning :
    The constellation Virgo is usually associated with the Greek goddess of justice, Dike. Dike was the daughter of Zeus and Greek Titaness Themis. Virgo is usually depicted with angel-like wings, with an ear of wheat in her left hand, marked by the bright star Spica. She is located next to Libra, the constellation representing the scales of justice. Dike was also sometimes known as Astraeia, daughter of Astraeus, considered father of the stars, and Eos, goddess of the dawn.

    In Greek mythology, Dike lived in the Golden Age of mankind. She was born a mortal and placed on Earth to rule over human justice. The Golden Age was marked by prosperity and peace, everlasting spring, and humans never knowing old age. When Zeus fulfilled the old prophecy and overthrew his father, this marked the beginning of the Silver Age, which was not as prosperous. Zeus introduced the four seasons and humans no longer honoured the gods as they had used to. Dike gave a speech to the entire race, warning them about the dangers of leaving behind the ideals of their predecessors and saying worse was yet to come. Then she flew to the mountains, turning her back on humans. When the Bronze and Iron Ages came and humans started warring among themselves, Dike left the Earth altogether, and flew to the heavens.
    In other stories, the constellation Virgo is identified with Demeter, the corn goddess Atargatis, the Syrian goddess of fertility, and Erigone, the daughter of Icarius, who hanged herself after her father’s death. In this version of the myth, Icarius is associated with the constellation Boötes and the star Procyon in Canis Minor represents Icarius’ loyal dog Maera.
    Historians Eratosthenes and Hyginus also associate the constellation Virgo with Tyche, the goddess of fortune, even though Tyche is usually depicted as holding the horn of plenty and not an ear of grain. The name of the star Spica, which marks the ear of grain held by the goddess, means exactly that, “the ear of grain” in Latin.
    http://www.constellation-guide.com/c...constellation/

    * * *
    As the only female figure of the zodiac, Virgo is associated with many goddesses from the ancient world. In Greece, for instance, Virgo was Dike, the goddess of justice, while another legend connects the constellations to Erigone, the virgin daughter of Icarius.Virgo is also linked with the tale of Persephone, daughter of Zeus and Demeter, the goddess of crops. When Persephone was abducted to the underworld by an amorous Hades, Demeter ruined the harvest in retaliation, until Zeus intervened so that Persephone could spend half the year with her mother on Earth, and the other half in the underworld. Hence, the summer and winter seasons.
    http://www.astronomytrek.com/virgo-the-virgin/


    Resources :
    http://www.derekscope.co.uk/constellation-20th/virgo/
    http://www.astronomytrek.com/virgo-the-virgin/
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Virgo_(constellation)
    http://rdanderson.com/stargate/glyphs/glyphs.htm
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stargate_(device)


    Glyph 4 – BOÖTES
    Name and meaning :
    According to myth, Boötes is credited for inventing the plough, which prompted the goddess Ceres – a goddess of agriculture, grain crops, fertility and motherly love – to place him in the heavens. There are also versions where Bootes represents a form of Atlas, holding up the weight of the world as it turns on its axis (yet another of Hercules’ labors).
    Most commonly, Boötes is taken to represent Arcas, the son of Zeus and Callisto. In this source, Arcas was brought up by Callisto father, the Arcadian king Lycaon. One day, Lycaon decided to test Zeus by serving him his own son for a meal. Zeus saw through Lycaon’s intentions and transformed the king into a wolf, killed his sons, and brought Arcas back to life.
    Having heard of her husband’s infidelity, Zeus’ wife Hera transformed Callisto into a bear. For years, she roamed the woods until she met her son, who was now grown up. Arcas didn’t recognize his mother and began to chase her. To avoid a tragic end, Zeus intervened by placing them both in the sky, where Callisto became Ursa Major (aka. The Big Dipper, or “Great Bear”) and Arcas became Boötes.
    In another story, Boötes is taken to represent Icarius, a grape grower who was given the secret of wine-making by Dionysus. Icarius used this to create a wonderful wine that he shared with all his neighbors. After overindulging, they woke up the next day with terrible hangovers and believed Icarius had tried to poison them. They killed him in his sleep, and a saddened Dionysus placed his friend among the stars.
    https://www.universetoday.com/19636/bootes/

    Resources :
    http://www.seasky.org/constellations...on-bootes.html
    [url]https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bo%C3%B6tes[/ur
    http://www.constellation-guide.com/c...constellation/
    http://rdanderson.com/stargate/glyphs/glyphs.htm
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stargate_(device)
    https://www.vectorstock.com/royalty-...vector-9178990
    https://www.britannica.com/place/Bootes
    https://www.globeatnight.org/mythology/bootes

    Glyph 5 – CENTAURUS
    Name and meaning :
    In classic Greco-Roman mythology, Centaurus is often associated with Chiron the Centaur – the wise half-man, half-horse who was a teacher to both Hercules and Jason and the son of the Titan king Cronus and the sea nymph Philyra. According to legend, Cronus seduced the nymph, but they were interrupted by Cronus’ wife Rhea. To evade being caught in the act, Cronus turned himself into a horse.
    As a result, Philyra gave birth to a hybrid son. He died a tragic death in the end, having been accidentally struck by one of Heracles’ poisoned arrows. As an immortal god, he suffered terrible pains but could not die. Zeus eventually took pity on the centaur and released him from immortality and suffering, allowing him to die, and placed him among the stars.
    It is believed that the constellation of Sagitta is the arrow which Chiron fired towards Aquila the Eagle to release the tortured Prometheus. The nearby constellation of Lupus the Wolf may also signify an offering of Hercules to Chiron – whom he accidentally poisoned. Just as Virgo above represents the maid placed in the sky as a sign of pity for the Centaur’s plight.
    https://www.universetoday.com/20032/centaurus/

    Centaurus is one of the largest constellations in the sky. It represents the centaur, the half man, half horse creature in Greek mythology. Sources tend to differ on which centaur the constellation represents, but usually it is taken to be Chiron, who mentored the Greek heroes Hercules, Peleus, Achilles, Theseus and Perseus.
    Centaurus contains two of the top ten brightest stars in the sky: Alpha Centauri and Beta Centauri. It is also home to Centaurus A, one of the brightest galaxies in the night sky, and to the globular cluster Omega Centauri. The famous Blue Planetary nebula, also known as the Southerner, and the Boomerang Nebula are also located in Centaurus.
    Centaurus was one of the constellations catalogued by the Greek astronomer Ptolemy in the 2nd century, but it had been mentioned in earlier Greek texts by the astronomer Eudoxus and the poet Aratus.
    http://www.constellation-guide.com/c...constellation/

    Resources :
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centaurus
    http://thestarsandplanets.com/ecosmos/page.php?id=29
    http://www.seasky.org/constellations...centaurus.html
    http://tothelandofdreams.blogspot.co...centaurus.html
    https://www.thoughtco.com/centaurus-...entaur-4147183
    https://in-the-sky.org/data/constellation.php?id=20
    https://myopencountry.com/hiking-cam...igating-stars/
    https://www.thoughtco.com/constellat...allery-4122769
    http://www.peoplesguidetothecosmos.c.../centaurus.htm
    http://rdanderson.com/stargate/glyphs/glyphs.htm
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stargate_(device)
    Last edited by Platschu; November 11, 2020, 05:36 AM.
    "I was hoping for another day. Looks like we just got a whole lot more than that. Let's not waste it."

    "Never underestimate your audience. They're generally sensitive, intelligent people who respond positively to quality entertainment."

    "Individual science fiction stories may seem as trivial as ever to the blinder critics and philosophers of today, but the core of science fiction, its essence, has become crucial to our salvation, if we are to be saved at all."

    #2
    Glyph 6 – LIBRA
    Name and meaning :
    Libra was known in Babylonian astronomy as MUL Zibanu (the "scales" or "balance"), or alternatively as the Claws of the Scorpion. The scales were held sacred to the sun god Shamash, who was also the patron of truth and justice.[1] It was also seen as the Scorpion's Claws in ancient Greece.[2] Since these times, Libra has been associated with law, fairness and civility. In Arabic zubānā means "scorpion's claws", and likely similarly in other Semitic languages: this resemblance of words may be why the Scorpion's claws became the Scales.[citation needed] It has also been suggested that the scales are an allusion to the fact that when the sun entered this part of the ecliptic at the autumnal equinox, the days and nights are equal.[3] Libra's status as the location of the equinox earned the equinox the name "First Point of Libra", though this location ceased to coincide with the constellation in 730 because of the precession of the equinoxes.[4]
    In ancient Egypt the three brightest stars of Libra (α, β, and σ Librae) formed a constellation that was viewed as a boat.[5] Libra is a constellation not mentioned by Eudoxus or Aratus.[3] Libra is mentioned by Manetho (3rd century B.C.) and Geminus (1st century B.C.), and included by Ptolemy in his 48 asterisms. Ptolemy catalogued 17 stars, Tycho Brahe 10, and Johannes Hevelius 20.[3] It only became a constellation in ancient Rome, when it began to represent the scales held by Astraea, the goddess of justice, associated with Virgo in the Greek mythology.[2]
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Libra_(constellation)

    Ancient Greeks knew the part of the sky occupied by the Libra constellation as Chelae, or “claws,” and considered it part of Scorpio constellation. Chelae represented the scorpion’s claws.
    The association of this region of the sky with scales was established among the Romans in the first century BC. It is said that Moon was located in Libra when Rome was founded. The Romans considered Libra to be a favoured constellation, one associated with balanced seasons and equal length of night and day. The Sun was at the autumnal equinox in Libra until the year 729, when the precession of the equinoxes shifted the equinox to Virgo. The autumnal equinox will move to constellation Leo in the year 2439.
    The Romans were not the first to associate Libra with the idea of balance. The Babylonians called it ZIB.BA.AN.NA, which means “the balance of heaven,” about a thousand years before Christ.
    Once Libra became associated with balance, its association with Scorpio’s claws faded and the one with the goddess of justice, the Greek Dike or Astraeia, represented by the constellation Virgo, became stronger.
    As a reminder that Libra was once considered a part of Scorpio constellation, the brightest star in Libra, Beta Librae, has the name Zubeneschamali, which means “the northern claw” in Arabic, while Alpha Librae, Zubenelgenubi, is “the southern claw.”
    http://www.constellation-guide.com/c...constellation/

    Resources :
    https://www.universetoday.com/21741/libra/
    http://earthsky.org/astronomy-essent...-constellation
    https://www.thoughtco.com/libra-constellation-4171591
    https://in-the-sky.org/data/constellation.php?id=50
    https://www.solarsystemquick.com/uni...stellation.htm
    http://www.constellation-guide.com/c...constellation/
    https://www.vectorstock.com/royalty-...ector-11699098
    https://www.amazon.com/Bullet-Journa.../dp/1977798799
    http://rdanderson.com/stargate/glyphs/glyphs.htm
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stargate_(device)


    Glyph 7 – SERPENS CAPUT
    Name and meaning :
    In Greek mythology, Serpens represents a snake held by the healer Asclepius. Represented in the sky by the constellation Ophiuchus, Asclepius once killed a snake, but the animal was subsequently resurrected after a second snake placed a revival herb on it before its death. As snakes shed their skin every year, they were known as the symbol of rebirth in ancient Greek society, and legend says Asclepius would revive dead humans using the same technique he witnessed. Although this is likely the logic for Serpens' presence with Ophiuchus, the true reason is still not fully known. Sometimes, Serpens was depicted as coiling around Ophiuchus, but the majority of atlases showed Serpens passing either behind Ophiuchus' body or between his legs.[1]
    In some ancient atlases, the constellations Serpens and Ophiuchus were depicted as two separate constellations, although more often they were shown as a single constellation. One notable figure to depict Serpens separately was Johann Bayer; thus, Serpens' stars are cataloged with separate Bayer designations from those of Ophiuchus. When Eugène Delporte established modern constellation boundaries in the 1920s, he elected to depict the two separately. However, this posed the problem of how to disentangle the two constellations, with Deporte deciding to split Serpens into two areas—the head and the tail—separated by the continuous Ophiuchus. These two areas became known as Serpens Caput and Serpens Cauda,[1] caput being the Latin word for head and cauda the Latin word for tail.[2]
    In Chinese astronomy, most of the stars of Serpens represented part of a wall surrounding a marketplace, known as Tianshi, which was in Ophiuchus and part of Hercules. Serpens also contains a few Chinese constellations. Two stars in the tail represented part of Shilou, the tower with the market office. Another star in the tail represented Liesi, jewel shops. One star in the head (Mu Serpentis) marked Tianru, the crown prince's wet nurse, or sometimes rain.[1]
    There were two "serpent" constellations in Babylonian astronomy, known as Mušḫuššu and Bašmu. It appears that Mušḫuššu was depicted as a hybrid of a dragon, a lion and a bird, and loosely corresponded to Hydra. Bašmu was a horned serpent (c.f. Ningishzida) and roughly corresponds to the Ὄφις constellation of Eudoxus of Cnidus on which the Ὄφις (Serpens) of Ptolemy is based.[3]
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serpens

    In Greek mythology, Serpens constellation represents a giant snake held by the healer Asclepius, represented by Ophiuchus constellation. Asclepius is usually depicted holding the top half of the snake in his left hand and the tail in his right hand.
    Asclepius was the son of the god Apollo who was said to be able to bring people back from the dead with his healing powers. In one of the stories, he killed a snake and saw it be brought back to life by a herb that another snake placed on it. It was said that Asclepius later used the same technique.
    The brightest star in the constellation, Unukalhai (Alpha Serpentis), represents the serpent’s neck, and Alya (Theta Serpentis) marks the tip of the snake’s tail.
    Serpens constellation dates back to Babylonian times. The Babylonians had two snake constellations. One represented a hybrid of a dragon, lion and bird and roughly corresponded to the constellation we know as Hydra, the water snake.
    The other Babylonian constellation, called Bašmu, was depicted as a horned serpent, and loosely corresponded to the constellation Ὄφις, created by the Greek astronomer Eudoxus of Cnidus in the 4th century BC, on which Ptolemy’s Serpens constellation was based.
    http://www.constellation-guide.com/c...constellation/
    http://www.seasky.org/constellations...ion-norma.html
    http://www.constellation-guide.com/c...constellation/

    Resources :
    https://www.universetoday.com/23586/serpens-caput/
    https://in-the-sky.org/data/constellation.php?id=77
    http://www.astronomytrek.com/star-co...facts-serpens/
    https://www.britannica.com/place/Serpens
    https://www.vectorstock.com/royalty-...ector-20887856
    http://sjastronomy.ca/sky-glance-july-15-22/
    http://www.germanicmythology.com/AST...pensCaput.html
    http://rdanderson.com/stargate/glyphs/glyphs.htm
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stargate_(device)



    Glyph 8 – NORMA
    Name and meaning :
    Norma was introduced in 1751–52 by Nicolas-Louis de Lacaille with the French name l’Équerre et la Règle, "the Square and Rule",[2][3] after he had observed and catalogued 10,000 southern stars during a two-year stay at the Cape of Good Hope. He devised 14 new constellations in uncharted regions of the Southern Celestial Hemisphere not visible from Europe. All but one honoured instruments that symbolised the Age of Enlightenment.[4][a] Lacaille portrayed the constellations of Norma, Circinus and Triangulum Australe, respectively, as a set square and ruler, a compass, and a surveyor's level in a set of draughtsman instruments, in his 1756 map of the southern stars.[5] The level was dangling from the apex of a triangle, leading some astronomers to conclude he was renaming l’Équerre et la Règle to "le Niveau", "the level".[6] In any case, the constellation's name had been shortened and Latinised by Lacaille to Norma by 1763
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norma_(constellation)

    Resources :
    https://in-the-sky.org/data/constellation.php?id=58
    http://www.seasky.org/constellations...ion-norma.html
    http://www.astronomytrek.com/star-co...n-facts-norma/
    http://rdanderson.com/stargate/glyphs/glyphs.htm
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stargate_(device)
    "I was hoping for another day. Looks like we just got a whole lot more than that. Let's not waste it."

    "Never underestimate your audience. They're generally sensitive, intelligent people who respond positively to quality entertainment."

    "Individual science fiction stories may seem as trivial as ever to the blinder critics and philosophers of today, but the core of science fiction, its essence, has become crucial to our salvation, if we are to be saved at all."

    Comment


      #3
      Glyph 9 – SCORPIO / SCORPIUS
      Name and meaning :
      In Greek mythology, the myths associated with Scorpio almost invariably also contain a reference to Orion. According to one of these myths it is written that Orion boasted to goddess Artemis and her mother, Leto, that he would kill every animal on the Earth. Although Artemis was known to be a hunter herself she offered protection to all creatures. Artemis and her mother Leto sent a scorpion to deal with Orion. The pair battled and the scorpion killed Orion. However, the contest was apparently a lively one that caught the attention of the king of the gods Zeus, who later raised the scorpion to heaven and afterwards, at the request of Artemis, did the same for Orion to serve as a reminder for mortals to curb their excessive pride. There is also a version that Orion was better than the goddess Artemis but said that Artemis was better than he and so Artemis took a liking to Orion. The god Apollo, Artemis's twin brother, grew angry and sent a scorpion to attack Orion. After Orion was killed, Artemis asked Zeus to put Orion up in the sky. So every winter Orion hunts in the sky, but every summer he flees as the constellation of the scorpion comes.
      In another Greek story involving Scorpio without Orion, Phaeton (the mortal male offspring of Helios) went to his father, who had earlier sworn by the River Styx to give Phaeton anything he should ask for. Phaeton wanted to drive his father's Sun Chariot for a day. Although Helios tried to dissuade his son, Phaeton was adamant. However, when the day arrived, Phaeton panicked and lost control of the white horses that drew the chariot. First, the Earth grew chill as Phaeton flew too high and encountered the celestial scorpion, its deadly sting raised to strike. Alarmed, he dipped the chariot too close, causing the vegetation to burn. By accident, Phaeton turned most of Africa into desert and darkened the skin of the Ethiopian nation until it was black. Eventually, Zeus was forced to intervene by striking the runaway chariot and Phaeton with a lightning bolt to put an end to its rampage and Phaeton plunged into the River Eridanos.

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scorpius

      In Greek mythology, the constellation Scorpius was identified with the scorpion that killed Orion, the mythical hunter. The two constellations lie opposite each other in the sky, and Orion is said to be fleeing from the scorpion as it sets just as Scorpius rises.

      In one version of the myth, Orion tried to ravish the goddess Artemis and she sent the scorpion to kill him. In another version, it was the Earth that sent the scorpion after Orion had boasted that he could kill any wild beast.
      In ancient Greek times, the constellation Scorpius was significantly larger and comprised of two halves, one with the scorpion’s body and the sting, and one containing the claws. The latter was called Chelae, or “claws.” In the first century BC, the Romans turned the claws into a separate constellation, Libra, the Scales.
      http://www.constellation-guide.com/c...constellation/

      Ptolemy makes the following observations: “The bright stars in the front of the body of Scorpio have an effect similar to that produced by the influence of Mars, and partly to that produced by Saturn: the three in the body itself are similar to Mars and moderately to Jupiter: those in the joints of the tail are like Saturn and partly like Venus: those in the sting, like Mercury and Mars.” By the Kabalists Scorpio is associated with the Hebrew letter Oin and the 16th Tarot Trump “The Lightning-Struck Tower.” [1]
      Scorpio, or Scorpius, the Scorpion was the reputed slayer of the Giant (Orion), exalted to the skies and now rising from the horizon as Orion, still in fear of the Scorpion, sinks below it; although the latter itself was in danger. Classical authors saw in it the monster that caused the disastrous runaway of the steeds of Phoebus Apollo when in the inexperienced hands of Phaethon. For some centuries before the Christian era it was the largest of the zodiac figures, forming with the Khelai, its Claws, — the prosectae chelae of Cicero, now our Libra, — a double constellation, as Ovid wrote: Porrigit in spatium signorum membra duorum; and this figuring has been adduced as the strongest proof of Scorpio’s great antiquity, from the belief that only six constellations made up the earliest zodiac, of which this extended sign was one.
      The Akkadians called it Girtab, the Seizer, or Stinger, and the Place where One Bows Down, titles indicative of the creature’s dangerous character; although some early translators of the cuneiform text rendered it the Double Sword. With later dwellers on the Euphrates it was the symbol of darkness, showing the decline of the sun’s power after the autumnal equinox, then located in it. Always prominent in that astronomy, Jensen thinks that it was formed there 5000 B.C., and pictured much as it now is; perhaps also in the semi-human form of two Scorpion-men, the early circular Altar, or Lamp, sometimes being shown grasped in the Claws, as the Scales were in illustrations of the 15th century. In Babylonia this calendar sign was identified with the eighth month, Arakh Savna, our October-November.
      Ampelius assigned to it the care of Africus, the Southwest Wind, a duty which, he said, Aries and Sagittarius shared; and the weather-wise of antiquity thought that its setting exerted a malignant influence, and was accompanied by storms; but the alchemists held it in high regard, for only when the sun was in this sign could the transmutation of iron into gold be performed. Astrologers, on the other hand, although they considered it a fruitful sign, “active and eminent,” knew it as the accursed constellation, the baleful source of war and discord, the birthplace of the planet Mars, and so the House of Mars, the Martis Sidus of Manilius. But this was located in the sting and tail; the claws, as Zugos, Jugum, or the Yoke of the Balance (Libra), being devoted to Venus, because this goddess united persons under the yoke of matrimony. It was supposed to govern the region of the groin in the human body, and to reign over Judaea, Mauritania, Catalonia, Norway, West Silesia, Upper Batavia, Barbary, Morocco, Valencia, and Messina; the earlier Manilius claiming it as the tutelary sign of Carthage, Libya, Egypt, Sardinia, and other islands of the Italian coast. Brown was its assigned color, and Pliny asserted that the appearance of a comet here portended a plague of reptiles and insects, especially of locusts. [2]

      The Scorpion presides over arms. By virtue of his tail armed with its powerful sting, wherewith, when conducting the Sun’s chariot through his sign, he cleaves the soil and sows seed in the furrow, the Scorpion creates natures ardent for war and active service, and a spirit which rejoices in plenteous bloodshed and in carnage more than in plunder. Why, these men spend even peace under arms; they fill the glades and scour the woods; they wage fierce warfare now against man, now against beast, and now they sell their persons to provide the spectacle of death and to perish in the arena, when, warfare in abeyance, they each find themselves foes to attack. There are those, too, who enjoy mock-fights and jousts in arms (such is their love of fighting) and devote their leisure to the study of war and every pursuit which arises from the art of war. [3]
      We come now right into the heart of the conflict. The star-picture brings before us a gigantic scorpion endeavouring to sting in the heel a mighty man who is struggling with a serpent, but is crushed by the man, who has his foot placed right on the scorpion’s heart. The Hebrew name is Akrab, which is the name of a scorpion, but also means the conflict, or war…The Coptic name is Isidis, which means the attack of the enemy, or oppression: referring to “the wicked that oppress me, my deadly enemies who compass me about” (Psa 17:9). The Arabic name is Al Akrab, which means wounding him that cometh. There are 44 stars altogether in this sign. One is of the 1st magnitude, one of the 2nd, eleven of the 3rd, eight of the 4th, etc. [4]

      https://astrologyking.com/constellation-scorpius/

      Resources :
      http://www.astronomytrek.com/scorpius-the-scorpion/
      https://in-the-sky.org/data/constellation.php?id=74
      https://earthsky.org/constellations/...-constellation
      https://www.britannica.com/place/Scorpius
      https://www.universetoday.com/23555/scorpius/
      https://www.solarsystemquick.com/uni...stellation.htm
      https://www.spacetelescope.org/images/heic0211e/
      https://www.thehoroscope.co/sign-art...-Facts-34.html
      http://rdanderson.com/stargate/glyphs/glyphs.htm
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stargate_(device)


      Glyph 10 – CORONA AUSTRALIS
      Name and meaning :
      Corona Australis may have been recorded by ancient Mesopotamians in the MUL.APIN, as a constellation called MA.GUR ("The Bark"). However, this constellation, adjacent to SUHUR.MASH ("The Goat-Fish", modern Capricornus), may instead have been modern Epsilon Sagittarii. As a part of the southern sky, MA.GUR was one of the fifteen "stars of Ea".[67]
      In the 3rd century BC, the Greek didactic poet Aratus wrote of, but did not name the constellation,[68] instead calling the two crowns Στεφάνοι (Stephanoi). The Greek astronomer Ptolemy described the constellation in the 2nd century AD, though with the inclusion of Alpha Telescopii, since transferred to Telescopium.[69] Ascribing 13 stars to the constellation,[10] he named it Στεφάνος νοτιος (Stephanos notios), "Southern Wreath", while other authors associated it with either Sagittarius (having fallen off his head) or Centaurus; with the former, it was called Corona Sagittarii.[70] Similarly, the Romans called Corona Australis the "Golden Crown of Sagittarius".[71] It was known as Parvum Coelum ("Canopy", "Little Sky") in the 5th century.[72] The 18th-century French astronomer Jérôme Lalande gave it the names Sertum Australe ("Southern Garland")[70][72] and Orbiculus Capitis, while German poet and author Philippus Caesius called it Corolla ("Little Crown") or Spira Australis ("Southern Coil"), and linked it with the Crown of Eternal Life from the New Testament. Seventeenth-century celestial cartographer Julius Schiller linked it to the Diadem of Solomon.[70] Sometimes, Corona Australis was not the wreath of Sagittarius but arrows held in his hand.[72]

      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Corona_Australis

      Corona Australis – the “Southern Crown” – is the counterpart to Corona Borealis – the “Northern Crown”. To the ancient Greeks, this constellation wasn’t seen as a crown, but a laurel wreath. According to some myths, Dionysus was supposed to have placed a wreath of myrtle as a gift to his dead mother into the underworld as well. Either way, this small circlet of dim stars definitely has the appearance of a wreath – or crown – and belongs to legend!
      https://www.universetoday.com/20483/...constellation/


      Resources :
      http://www.derekscope.co.uk/constell...ona-australis/
      https://astrologyking.com/constellat...rona-borealis/
      http://www.peoplesguidetothecosmos.c...aaustralis.htm
      http://www.constellation-guide.com/c...constellation/
      https://www.astronomytrek.com/star-c...ona-australis/
      http://rdanderson.com/stargate/glyphs/glyphs.htm
      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stargate_(device)
      http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Glyph
      "I was hoping for another day. Looks like we just got a whole lot more than that. Let's not waste it."

      "Never underestimate your audience. They're generally sensitive, intelligent people who respond positively to quality entertainment."

      "Individual science fiction stories may seem as trivial as ever to the blinder critics and philosophers of today, but the core of science fiction, its essence, has become crucial to our salvation, if we are to be saved at all."

      Comment


        #4
        Glyph 11 - SCUTUM
        Name and meaning :
        Scutum was named in 1684 by Polish astronomer Johannes Hevelius[1] (Jan Heweliusz), who originally named it Scutum Sobiescianum (Shield of Sobieski) to commemorate the victory of the Christian forces led by Polish King John III Sobieski (Jan III Sobieski) in the Battle of Vienna in 1683. Later, the name was shortened to Scutum.
        Five bright stars of Scutum (α Sct, β Sct, δ Sct, ε Sct and η Sct) were previously known as 1, 6, 2, 3, and 9 Aquilae respectively.[2]
        Coincidentally, the Chinese also associated these stars with battle armor, incorporating them into the larger asterism known as Tien Pien, i.e., the Heavenly Casque (or Helmet).
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scutum_(constellation)


        Resources :
        http://www.constellation-guide.com/c...constellation/
        http://www.ianridpath.com/startales/scutum.htm
        http://www.derekscope.co.uk/constellation-20th/scutum/
        http://www.seasky.org/constellations...on-scutum.html
        http://www.constellationsofwords.com...ons/Scutum.htm
        http://www.wirus.info/s/scutum-const...mythology.html
        http://www.wikiwand.com/en/Scutum_(constellation)
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scutum_(constellation)
        http://rdanderson.com/stargate/glyphs/glyphs.htm
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stargate_(device)
        http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Glyph
        Special thanks to Vilnisr.


        Glyph 12 – SAGITTARIUS
        Name and meaning :
        In Greek mythology, Sagittarius represents a centaur, a half human, half horse creature with the torso of a man and the body and four legs of a horse. The centaur is depicted as aiming an arrow toward the heart of the neighbouring constellation Scorpio, represented by the red supergiant star Antares. Sometimes Sagittarius is wrongly identified as the centaur Chiron, represented by the constellation Centaurus.
        Sagittarius constellation has its roots in Sumerian mythology. Eratosthenes associated it with Crotus, a mythical creature with two feet and a satyr’s tail, who was the nurse to the nine Muses, daughters of Zeus.
        Eratosthenes argued that the constellation really represented a satyr and not a centaur. According to the Roman author Hyginus, Crotus was the son of Pan and the archer the constellation was named after. Crotus invented archery and lived on Mount Helicon. Because he was close to the Muses, they were the ones who asked Zeus to place him in the sky.
        In Babylonian mythology, Sagittarius is associated with the centaur-like god Nergal, and depicted with two heads – one human and one panther – and also wings, and the stinger of a scorpion positioned above a horse’s tail.
        http://www.constellation-guide.com/c...constellation/

        Resources :
        http://www.astronomytrek.com/sagittarius-the-archer/
        https://earthsky.org/astronomy-essen...-constellation
        https://www.solarsystemquick.com/uni...stellation.htm
        https://www.dkfindout.com/uk/space/c...s/sagittarius/
        https://www.thoughtco.com/sagittariu...lation-4174117
        http://www.seasky.org/constellations...gittarius.html
        https://in-the-sky.org/data/constellation.php?id=73
        https://www.britannica.com/place/Sag...-constellation
        http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/S/Sgr.html
        https://www.universeguide.com/constellation/sagittarius
        https://www.123rf.com/photo_70821863...tarry-sky.html
        https://www.pinterest.com/pin/581949583074172923/
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sagitt...constellation)
        http://rdanderson.com/stargate/glyphs/glyphs.htm
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stargate_(device)
        http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Glyph
        Special thanks to Vilnisr.

        Glyph 13 – AQUILA
        Name and meaning :
        According to Gavin White, the Babylonian Eagle carried the constellation called the Dead Man in its talons. The author also draws a comparison to the classical stories of Antinous and Ganymede.[5]
        In classical Greek mythology, Aquila was identified as Αετός Δίας (Aetos Dios), the eagle that carried the thunderbolts of Zeus and was sent by him to carry the shepherd boy Ganymede, whom he desired, to Mount Olympus; the constellation of Aquarius is sometimes identified with Ganymede.[1]
        In the Chinese love story of Qi Xi, Niu Lang (Altair) and his two children (β and γ Aquilae) are separated forever from their wife and mother Zhi Nu (Vega), who is on the far side of the river, the Milky Way.[citation needed]
        In Hinduism, the constellation Aquila is identified with the half-eagle half-human deity Garuda.[10][11]
        In ancient Egypt, Aquila possibly was seen as the falcon of Horus.[12] According to Berio, the identification of Aquila as an Egyptian constellation, and not merely Graeco-Babylonian, is corroborated by the Daressy Zodiac.[13] It depicts an outer ring showing the Sphaera Graeca, the familiar Hellenistic zodiac, while the middle ring depicts the Sphaera Barbarica or foreigner's zodiac with the zodiacal signs of the Egyptian dodekaoros which were also recorded by Teucros of Babylon.[14] Under the sign of Sagittarius is the falcon of Horus, presumably because Aquila rises with Sagittarius.
        Aquila was one of the 48 constellations described by the second-century astronomer Ptolemy. It had been earlier mentioned by Eudoxus in the fourth century BC and Aratus in the third century BC.[3]
        It is now one of the 88 constellations defined by the International Astronomical Union. The constellation was also known as Vultur volans (the flying vulture) to the Romans, not to be confused with Vultur cadens which was their name for Lyra. It is often held to represent the eagle which held Zeus's/Jupiter's thunderbolts in Greco-Roman mythology. Aquila is also associated with the eagle that kidnapped Ganymede, a son of one of the kings of Troy (associated with Aquarius), to Mount Olympus to serve as cup-bearer to the gods.[1]
        Ptolemy catalogued 19 stars jointly in this constellation and in the now obsolete constellation of Antinous, which was named in the reign of the emperor Hadrian (AD 117–138), but sometimes erroneously attributed to Tycho Brahe, who catalogued 12 stars in Aquila and seven in Antinous. Hevelius determined 23 stars in the first[4] and 19 in the second.[4][3]
        The Greek Aquila is probably based on the Babylonian constellation of the Eagle, which is located in the same area as the Greek constellation
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aquila_(constellation)


        In Greek mythology, Aquila is identified as the eagle that carried Zeus’ thunderbolts and was once dispatched by the god to carry Ganymede, the young Trojan boy Zeus desired, to Olympus to be the cup bearer of the gods. Ganymede is represented by the neighbouring constellation Aquarius.
        In another story, the eagle is found guarding the arrow of Eros (represented by the constellation Sagitta), which hit Zeus and made him love-struck.
        In yet another myth, Aquila represents Aphrodite disguised as an eagle, pretending to pursue Zeus in the form of a swan, so that Zeus’ love interest, the goddess Nemesis, would give him shelter. In the story, Zeus later placed the images of the eagle and the swan among the stars to commemorate the event.
        The name of the brightest star in the constellation, Altair, is derived from the Arabic al-nasr al-ta’ir, which means “flying eagle” or “vulture.” Ptolemy called the star Aetus, which is Latin for “eagle.” Similarly, both Babylonians and Sumerians called Altair “the eagle star.”
        http://www.constellation-guide.com/c...constellation/

        Aquila was born out of several different myths, with the Greek origin story associating it with the eagle that carried Zeus’ thunderbolts, and acted as his personal animal messenger. The eagle also carried the young Trojan prince Ganymede to Zeus to act as his cup-bearer, with the handsome youth represented by the nearby constellation of Aquarius.
        Another myth states that Aquila is the eagle who protected the arrow of Eros, commemorated by the constellation Sagitta (arrow), while an alternate legend tells that it represents Aphrodite, who disguised herself as an eagle pretending to hunt Zeus disguised as a swan so that his love interest, Nemesis, would take pity on the swan and provide him with sanctuary. Zeus later commemorated the event by placing the swan and eagle amongst the stars as the constellations Cygnus and Aquila.
        http://www.astronomytrek.com/star-co...-facts-aquila/

        Resources :
        http://www.ianridpath.com/startales/aquila.htm
        http://jasonsugar.me/aquila-constell...lation-images/
        https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/F...ve_cropped.png
        https://earthsky.org/tonight/summer-...ation-aquila-2
        http://www.seasky.org/constellations...on-aquila.html
        https://www.universetoday.com/19592/aquila/
        https://www.britannica.com/place/Aquila-constellation
        https://in-the-sky.org/data/constellation.php?id=6
        https://www.universeguide.com/constellation/aquila
        http://rdanderson.com/stargate/glyphs/glyphs.htm
        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stargate_(device)
        http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Glyph
        Special thanks to Vilnisr.
        "I was hoping for another day. Looks like we just got a whole lot more than that. Let's not waste it."

        "Never underestimate your audience. They're generally sensitive, intelligent people who respond positively to quality entertainment."

        "Individual science fiction stories may seem as trivial as ever to the blinder critics and philosophers of today, but the core of science fiction, its essence, has become crucial to our salvation, if we are to be saved at all."

        Comment


          #5
          Glyph 14 – MICROSCOPIUM
          Name and meaning :
          In the late 16th century, Dutch astronomer Petrus Plancius created 12 new southern sky constellations, while in the mid-18th century French astronomer Nicolas-Louis de Lacaille added a further 14 new constellations to the list of 32 southern sky constellations, including Microscopium. He created it to honor the compound microscope, or one that employs more than a single lens, and imagined the constellation as “a tube above a square box”.
          https://www.astronomytrek.com/star-c...-microscopium/

          Resources :
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microscopium
          http://www.constellation-guide.com/c...constellation/
          http://www.seasky.org/constellations...roscopium.html
          https://www.astronomytrek.com/star-c...-microscopium/
          https://www.universeguide.com/conste...n/microscopium
          https://in-the-sky.org/data/constellation.php?id=55
          https://www.britannica.com/place/Microscopium
          http://www.derekscope.co.uk/constell.../microscopium/
          https://www.123rf.com/photo_56911872...tellation.html
          http://rdanderson.com/stargate/glyphs/glyphs.htm
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stargate_(device)
          http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Glyph
          Special thanks to Vilnisr.

          Glyph 15 - CAPRICORNUS
          Name and meaning :
          Despite its faintness, Capricornus has one of the oldest mythological associations, having been consistently represented as a hybrid of a goat and a fish since the Middle Bronze Age. First attested in depictions on a cylinder-seal from around the 21st century BC,[6] it was explicitly recorded in the Babylonian star catalogues as MULSUḪUR.MAŠ "The Goat-Fish" before 1000 BC. The constellation was a symbol of the god Ea and in the Early Bronze Age marked the winter solstice.[7]
          In Greek mythology, the constellation is sometimes identified as Amalthea, the goat that suckled the infant Zeus after his mother, Rhea, saved him from being devoured by his father, Cronos. The goat's broken horn was transformed into the cornucopia or horn of plenty.[8] According to some ancient Greek myths, it started with the sea-goat Pricus. he was the father of the race of sea-goats (half goats half fish), who were intelligent and honourable creatures. They lived in the sea near the shore. They could speak and think according to Greek legend. They were favoured by the gods. Pricus is tied to Chronos (Greek mythology), the god of time. Chronos created the immortal Pricus, who shares Chronos's ability to manipulate time.[9] He had lots of children who lived near the seashore, however, when they found themselves on the dry land they turned into normal goats, losing their special ability to think and speak in the proses. in an effort to prevent this pricus turns back time, again and again, however, he eventually resigns himself to loneliness and misery, letting the little Sea Goats leave him. learning he cannot control their fate and not wanting to be the only Sea Goat prompts him to ask Chronos to let him die. Because he is immortal instead he must spend eternity in the sky as Capricorn.[10] Capricornus is also sometimes identified as Pan, the god with a goat's head, who saved himself from the monster Typhon by giving himself a fish's tail and diving into a river.[3]
          Due to the precession of the equinoxes, the December solstice no longer takes place while the sun is in the constellation Capricornus, as it did until 130 BCE, but the astrological sign called Capricorn begins with the solstice. The solstice now takes place when the Sun is in the constellation (not the sign) of Sagittarius. The sun's most southerly position, which is attained at the northern hemisphere's winter solstice, is now called the Tropic of Capricorn, a term which also applies to the line on the Earth at which the sun is directly overhead at noon on that solstice. The Sun is now in Capricorn from late January through mid-February.[3]
          The planet Neptune was discovered by German astronomer Johann Galle, near Deneb Algedi (δ Capricorni) on September 23, 1846, which is appropriate as Capricornus can be seen best from Europe at 4:00am in September (although, by modern constellation boundaries established in the early 20th Century, Neptune lay within the confines of Aquarius at the time of its discovery).
          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Capricornus

          Even though Capricornus is the second faintest constellation in the sky, after Cancer, it is associated with myths and images that go way back to the 21st century BC.
          The story of Capricornus originated with the Babylonians and Sumerians. The Sumerians knew it as the goat-fish, or SUHUR-MASH-HA, while the Babylonian star catalogues dating back to 1000 BC mention the constellation as MUL.SUHUR.MAŠ, also meaning “goat fish.” In the early Bronze Age, Capricornus marked the winter solstice and, in modern astrology, Capricorn’s rule still begins on the first day of winter.
          The Greeks associated the constellation with the forest deity Pan, who had the legs and horns of a goat. Crotus, his son, is usually identified with another amphibious creature, represented by the neighboring constellation Sagittarius.
          Pan was placed in the sky by Zeus in gratitude for his coming to the other gods’ rescue on several occasions.
          During the gods’ war with the Titans, Pan helped scare the Titans away by blowing his conch shell and he later warned the gods that Typhon, a monster sent by Gaia to fight the gods, was approaching. He also suggested that the gods disguise themselves as animals until the danger passed.
          In the myth, Pan eluded the monster himself by jumping into the river Nile and turning the lower part of his body into that of a fish. Zeus eventually killed Typhon with his thunderbolts. In reference to the myth, Capricornus is still often depicted as a goat with the tail of a fish.
          In another story, Capricornus is identified as Amalthea, the goat that suckled Zeus when he was an infant, hiding from his father Cronos. Cronos had devoured his other children, all future gods and goddesses, because of a prophecy that he would be overthrown by one of them.
          http://www.constellation-guide.com/c...constellation/

          Ptolemy’s observations are as follows “The stars in the horns of Capricorn have efficacy similar to that of Venus, and partly to that of Mars. The stars in the mouth are like Saturn, and partly like Venus: those in the feet and in the belly act in the same manner as Mars and Mercury: those in the tail are like Saturn and Jupiter.” By the Kabalists this constellation is associated with the Hebrew letter Yod and the 10th Tarot Trump “The Wheel of Fortune.” [1]
          The constellation Capricorn has a great influence over human affairs portending major changes in such areas as climate and political customs. Along with the sign, the constellation is also noted as the “Mansion of Kings.” Unfavorably situated with regards to lunar eclipses, it indicates major storms, especially at sea. [2]
          Capricornus next to the eastward from Sagittarius, is our Capricorn, the French Capricorne, the Italian Capricorno, and the, German Steinbock, — Stone-buck, or Ibex, — the Anglo-Saxon Bucca and Buccan Horn…Very frequent mention was made of this constellation in early days, for the Platonists held that the souls of men, when released from corporeity, ascended to heaven through its stars, whence it was called the Gate of the Gods; their road of descent having been through Cancer. But some of the Orientals knew it as the Southern Gate of the Sun, as did the Latins in their altera Solis Porta. Berossos (the Babylonian historian Berossos, about 200 BC) is reported by Seneca to have learned from the old books of Sargon [this Sargon has been considered the almost mythical founder of the first Semitic empire, 3850 BC.] that the world would be destroyed by a great conflagration when all the planets met in this sign…
          In astrology, with Taurus and Virgo, it was the Earthly Trigon, and black, russet, or a swarthy brown, was the color assigned to it; while, with Aquarius, it was the House of Saturn, as that planet was created in this constellation, and whenever here had great influence over human affairs; as Alchabitus asserted, in the Ysagogicus of 1485, caput et pedes habet; and it always governed the thighs and knees. It also was regarded as under the care of the goddess Vesta, and hence Vestae Sidus. Ampelius singularly associated it with the burning south wind Auster, and Manilius said that it reigned over France, Germany, and Spain; in later times it ruled Greece, India, Macedonia, and Thrace, Brandenburg and Mecklenburg, Saxony and Wilna, Mexico and Oxford. Manilius also wrote of it as in our motto, And at Caesar’s Birth Serene he shone.
          The almanac of 1386 has: “Whoso is borne in Capcorn schal be ryche and wel lufyd”; in 1542 the Doctor, as Arcandum was called, showed that a man born under it would be a great gallant, would have eight special illnesses, and would die at sixty; and according to Smyth it was “the very pet of all constellations with astrologers, having been the fortunate sign under which Augustus and Vespasian were born,” although elsewhere, in somewhat uncourtly style, he quotes: “prosperous in dull and heavy beasts.” It also appears to have been much and favorably regarded by the Arabians, as may be seen in their names for its chief stars, and in the character assigned by them to its lunar mansions. But these benign qualities were only occasional, caused probably by some lucky combination with a fortunate sign, as is known only to the initiated, for its general reputation was the reverse; and, in classical days, when coincident with the sun, it was thought a harbinger of storms and so ruler of the waters. [3]
          "I was hoping for another day. Looks like we just got a whole lot more than that. Let's not waste it."

          "Never underestimate your audience. They're generally sensitive, intelligent people who respond positively to quality entertainment."

          "Individual science fiction stories may seem as trivial as ever to the blinder critics and philosophers of today, but the core of science fiction, its essence, has become crucial to our salvation, if we are to be saved at all."

          Comment


            #6
            In her shrine Vesta tends your fires, Capricorn: and from her you derive your skills and callings. For whatever needs fire to function and demands a renewal of flame for its work must be counted as of your domain. To pry for hidden metals, to smelt out riches deposited in the veins of the earth, to fold sure-handed the malleable mass—these skills will come from you, as will aught which is fashioned of silver or gold. That hot furnaces melt iron and bronze, and ovens give to the wheat its final form, will come as gifts from you. You also give a fondness for clothes and wares which dispel the cold, since your lot falls for all time in winter’s season, wherein you shorten the nights you have brought to their greatest length and give birth to a new year by enlarging the daylight hours. Hence comes a restless quality in their lives and a mind which is often changed and floats this way and that; the first half of the sign is the slave of Venus, and that with guilt involved, but a more virtuous old age is promised by the conjoined fish below. [4]
            Giedi is the first star by longitude in Capricorn, also the first by Greek letter rating, α Capricorni, though not actually the brightest. It should be pronounced ‘zhaydy’, coming from one of the Arabic words for goat: Al Jadii. Situated in the head of the creature, it is actually a stellium of five stars in two very close groups, α¹ and α². The first contains three stars, the second two. Very close to these is γ Capricorni, Al Shat (the Sheep), generally viewed as a ‘sacrificial lamb’ symbol, while conjunct in longitude but somewhat to the south of the others is β Capricorni, Dabih, ‘The Slaughterer’. This is another apparent double star, β¹ and β². It will serve us best to consider the whole group at once.
            Ptolemy gave Giedi the very unusual rating of a Venus-Mars type, while Dabih, its full name being Al Sa’ad al Dhabih, the Lucky Slaughterer, is a Saturn-Venus. He did not mention Al Shat, which seems to have been introduced into the scene by Arab astronomers, for the attention of Mr. Dabih, we must presume.
            Readers will generally be familiar with the story of Abraham being spared at the last moment from having to sacrifice his son Isaac when God provided a sheep as an alternative. Learned clergy of three religions have written volumes about this legend, a rather sick one to most people today. Human sacrifice may have had its origins in one of two ways after the Great Disaster; either the shortage of food was such that warring between communities was conducted for what little was available, including the bodies captured, dead or alive, or else the general condition of the survivors was so poor that the leaders had many of the culled to preserve the quality of the fitter ones. It sounds horrible either way, and so it was, but quite possible. The growth of the idea that it was Divinely ordained is not surprising in the wake of a cosmic disaster that had almost wiped out everyone. [5]
            https://astrologyking.com/constellation-capricornus/


            Resources :
            https://www.space.com/21414-capricor...tellation.html
            https://earthsky.org/astronomy-essen...-constellation
            https://www.universetoday.com/19825/...n-capricornus/
            http://www.astronomytrek.com/capricornus/
            http://www.seasky.org/constellations...pricornus.html
            https://www.heavens-above.com/myth.a...&tz=UCT&cul=en
            https://www.solarsystemquick.com/uni...stellation.htm
            https://maas.museum/observations/201...-the-sea-goat/
            http://astrologyclub.org/capricorn-constellation/
            https://www.stockunlimited.com/vecto...n_1964123.html
            http://rdanderson.com/stargate/glyphs/glyphs.htm
            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stargate_(device)
            http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Glyph
            Special thanks to Vilnisr.

            Glyph 16 – PISCIS AUSTRINUS
            Name and meaning :
            Piscis Austrinus is one of the 48 Greek constellations, listed by the astronomer Ptolemy in the 2nd century. It used to contain the stars that now belong to Grus constellation.
            The constellation has its origins in Babylonian culture, where it was known as the Fish, or MUL.KU. It was associated with the myth about the Syrian fertility goddess Atargatis, who fell into a lake near the river Euphrates in what is today northern Syria, and was rescued by a large fish. The goddess would later punish all those who ate fish, but her priests were allowed to eat it every day.
            In a different version of the story, she deliberately threw herself into the lake, attempting to commit suicide after having an affair with a man and bearing his child. In this version, she killed the man and abandoned her daughter, and was turned into a mermaid in the lake. Her daughter was brought up by doves and grew up to be Semiramis, the Assyrian queen.
            The Greeks knew the constellation as the Great Fish and depicted it as swallowing the water poured by Aquarius, the water bearer. The two fish represented by Pisces constellation were said to be the offspring of the Great Fish.
            In Greek mythology, there is a similar tale associated with Pisces. In the tale, the goddess Aphrodite took the form of a fish to hide from the monster Typhon. She and her son Eros and leapt into the river Euphrates and begged the river nymphs for help. Two fish bore them up and the goddess later honoured them by transforming them into the constellation Pisces.
            Egyptians also associated the constellation with a fish, one that saved the life of the goddess Isis. To honour the fish, she placed it into the sky as a constellation, and did the same with its offspring.
            http://www.constellation-guide.com/c...constellation/

            Eratosthenes called this the Great Fish and said that it was the parent of the two smaller fish of the zodiacal constellation Pisces. Like Pisces, its mythology has a Middle Eastern setting that reveals its Babylonian origin.

            According to the brief account of Eratosthenes, the Syrian fertility goddess Derceto (the Greek name for Atargatis) is supposed to have fallen into a lake at Bambyce near the river Euphrates in northern Syria, and was saved by a large fish. Hyginus says, in repetition of his note on Pisces, that as a result of this the Syrians do not eat fish but they worship the images of fish as gods. All the accounts of this constellation’s mythology are disappointingly sketchy.

            Bambyce later became known to the Greeks as Hieropolis (meaning ‘sacred city’), now called Manbij. Other classical sources tell us that temples of Atargatis contained ponds of sacred fish. The goddess was said to punish those who ate fish by making them ill, but her priests safely ate fish in a theophagic ritual.

            According to the Greek writer Diodorus Siculus (1st century BC), Derceto deliberately threw herself into a lake at Ascalon in Palestine as a suicide bid in shame for a love affair with a young Syrian, Caystrus, by whom she bore a daughter, Semiramis. Derceto killed her lover and abandoned her child, who was brought up by doves and later became queen of Babylon. In the lake, Derceto was turned into a mermaid, half woman, half fish.

            Ptolemy listed the constellation in the Almagest as Ἰχθύς Νότιος (Ichthys Notios), while a common Latin alternative was Piscis Notius, used by Bayer, Hevelius, and Bode. John Flamsteed, though, preferred the title Piscis Austrinus in his star catalogue (1725) and atlas (1729) and his choice eventually prevailed.

            Stars of Piscis Austrinus
            Piscis Austrinus is more noticeable in the sky than the zodiacal Pisces because it contains the first-magnitude star Fomalhaut. This name comes from the Arabic fam al-hut meaning ‘fish’s mouth’, which is where Ptolemy described it as lying. In the sky the fish is shown drinking the water flowing from the jar of Aquarius, a strange thing for a fish to do. The flow of water ends at Fomalhaut, which Ptolemy regarded as being common to Aquarius and Piscis Austrinus. Bedouin Arabs visualized Fomalhaut and Achernar (in Eridanus) as a pair of ostriches. The name Fomalhaut is sometimes mis-spelled ‘Formalhaut’.

            In the Almagest, Ptolemy listed six additional stars in this area that did not form part of Piscis Austrinus; these are now assigned to the modern figure of Microscopium. In addition, when the 12 new southern constellations of Keyser and de Houtman were invented at the end of the 16th century, the star that Ptolemy placed at the tip of the fish’s tail was appropriated for use as the head of the new constellation Grus, the crane; it is now known as Gamma Gruis. Piscis Austrinus was the final constellation in Ptolemy’s star catalogue in the Almagest.

            Chinese associations
            Chinese astronomers called Fomalhaut Beiluo shimen, the gate to the encampment of Yulinjun, the Royal Guards, a large constellation to the north of it. Epsilon and Lambda Piscis Austrini, along with another two or three fainter members of Piscis Austrinus, were part of Yulinjun, most of which was in Aquarius. Delta Piscis Austrini was Tiangang, ‘celestial net’, representing tent-making facilities for the military camp.

            Gamma Piscis Austrini plus three other stars, possibly including Gamma and Lambda Gruis, formed Baijiu, a bowl or tub, said by some to be for waste disposal. Ten stars including Mu, Theta, and Iota Piscis Austrini formed Tianqian, ‘celestial money’, interpreted variously as coins or paper money; one interpretation says it was paper money to be burnt in Baijiu to appease ghostly spirits.

            http://www.ianridpath.com/startales/piscisaustrinus.htm



            Resources :
            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Piscis_Austrinus
            https://www.astronomytrek.com/star-c...cis-austrinus/
            http://www.seasky.org/constellations...austrinus.html
            https://www.universetoday.com/23183/piscis-austrinus/
            https://in-the-sky.org/data/constellation.php?id=68
            https://www.britannica.com/place/Piscis-Austrinus
            https://sites.google.com/site/knowle...scis-austrinus
            https://www.universeguide.com/conste...iscisaustrinus
            http://astronomyonline.org/ViewImage...uthern+Fish%29
            https://www.123rf.com/photo_34129687...n-in-blue.html
            https://www.stellar-journeys.org/aquarius.htm
            http://rdanderson.com/stargate/glyphs/glyphs.htm
            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stargate_(device)
            http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Glyph
            Special thanks to Vilnisr.
            "I was hoping for another day. Looks like we just got a whole lot more than that. Let's not waste it."

            "Never underestimate your audience. They're generally sensitive, intelligent people who respond positively to quality entertainment."

            "Individual science fiction stories may seem as trivial as ever to the blinder critics and philosophers of today, but the core of science fiction, its essence, has become crucial to our salvation, if we are to be saved at all."

            Comment


              #7
              Glyph 17 - EQUULEUS
              Name and meaning :
              Equuleus is associated with Celeris, a young horse and brother to the famed winged horse Pegasus that was given to Castor by the god Mercury. Because it rises in the night sky before Pegasus, the constellation was often referred to as Equus Primus, meaning the First Horse. In another legend, however, it was said to represent Cyllarus, a magnificent horse who was gifted to Pollux by the goddess Hera, who in turn had received it from Poseidon.
              Still another myth identifies the constellation with Hippe or Euippe, daughter of the centaur Chiron, who found herself seduced and impregnated by Aeolus, the wind god. Unwilling to tell her father the embarrassing truth, she kept her pregnancy a secret and eventually ran off to the mountains where she gave birth to Melanippe. After her father came looking for her, Hippe prayed to the gods that her father would not find her, and so Artemis turned her into a mare, later placing her amongst the stars as a constellation. Even now Hippe appears to be hiding from her father, Chiron, as only the mare’s head is showing behind Pegasus in the night sky. Her father is represented by the Centaurus constellation.
              http://www.astronomytrek.com/star-co...acts-equuleus/
              "He, O Castor, was a courser worthy thee ...
              Coal-black his color, but like jet it shone:
              His legs and flowing tail were white alone."
              Dryden: Ovid's Metamorphose, xii.

              Equuleus is the second smallest constellation in the Northern Hemisphere, tucked between the head of Pegasus and the dolphin, Delphinus. There is no certain legend applied to Equuleus and it is supposedly created by the second-century Greek astronomer Ptolemy because it was added to his Algamest, though according to Geminos (130 - 60 B.C.) it was created by Hipparchos (Hipparchus), the Greek astronomer who lived around 190-120 B.C. Hipparchus mapped the position of 850 stars in the earliest known star chart. His observations of the heavens form the basis of Ptolemy's geocentric cosmology [AHD] [Allen argues on p.218 of Star Names that because Ptolemy did not mention the star near the south pole, Achernar, that his catalogue was not based upon original observations, but drawn from the now lost catalogue of Hipparchos]. Hipparchos is also credited with discovering the precession of the equinoxes, or as Allen believes (p.209), may have been merely the publisher of that discovery made by the Egyptians, or perhaps adopted by them from Chaldaea.
              Equuleus is the head of a horse with a flowing mane which the Arabs called Al Faras al Awwal, 'the First Horse', in reference to its rising before Pegasus. Ptolemy called it Ippou Protome; Ippou, or hippo, is Greek for horse. Greek protome means head or bust (in sculpture), with later astronomers it was Equus primus and prior. The image is traditionally a figure of a horse or foal, said to represent either Celeris, the brother of Pegasus, given by Mercury to Castor (Ovid, Met., xii. 408); or Cyllarus, given to Pollux by Juno, (Virgil, Geor., iii. 90). Others say he was Pegasus' offspring and a flying colt, or the creature struck by Neptune's trident from the earth when contesting with Minerva for superiority of Athens.
              Hevelius, Firmamentum, 1690, depicts the head of Aquarius (Ganymedes) encroaching onto the heads of the two horses; Pegasus and Equuleus. A Homer poem tells how Ganymedes was carried off by Zeus and to compensate the father of Ganymedes, King Laomedon of Troy, Zeus gave him two horses [1].
              This horse is identified with Celeris, the word celeris is related to Greek keleuein, 'to urge on, exhort, order', kellein, 'to drive on', Greek keles, 'race horse', 'racing boat', from the Indo-European root *kel-3 'To drive, set in swift motion'. Derivatives: hold (keep in one's grasp), behold (to look upon), upholsterer, halt1(to stop), avast (a command to stop or desist), celerity, acceleration, accelerate, accelerant (a substance that is used as a catalyst, as in spreading an intentionally set fire). Possibly further suffixed form *keles-ri-; celebrate, celebrant, celebrity, (these words from Latin celeber, which originally meant 'attend in great numbers, 'to attend a festival' from celeber, celebris, celebre, 'thronged, frequented, well-known'). [Pokorny 5. kel- 548. Watkins]
              Klein supplies more cognates to *kel-3 ': acolyte (one who assists the celebrant in the performance of liturgical rites, from Greek akholouthos, a- + keleuthos is cognate with Lithuanian kelias, 'way', keliauju, 'I journey', from Indo-European base *qeleu-, enlargement of *qel-, *kel-, 'to drive', whence Latin celer, 'swift'), clonus (from the Greek for 'violent, confused motion', is a series of involuntary muscular contractions due to sudden stretching of the muscle), hodden (a coarse kind of cloth made of undyed wool, in Scotland), holt (lair of an animal), proceleusmatic (a metrical foot of four short syllables, from Greek prokeleusmatikos, 'to give orders before', from keleuein, to rouse to action. "The ancient proceleusmatic song by which the rowers of galleys were animated may be supposed to have been of this kind." [Samuel Johnson 3]).
              "Some of the mythologists said that the constellation represented ... the creature struck by Neptune's (Poseidon) trident from the earth when contesting with Minerva (Athena) for superiority" (over Athens. See that myth below). [Allen, Star Names].
              Or it could be the foal (Equuleus is also said to be a foal) Rhea tricked Cronus into swallowing as a substitute for their son Poseidon (an aspect of Poseidon)? Poseidon is said to have invented horse racing. Horses were sacrificed in his honor [7]. "Some storytellers insisted he invented the horse by smashing his trident down upon a rock. In any case, it is said that he invented horse racing" [8] Pegasus was a son of Poseidon because he mated with the Gorgon Medusa in that form.
              "Poseidon was a son of Cronus and Rhea. In most accounts, he is swallowed by Cronus at birth. However in some versions of the story, he, like his brother Zeus, did not share the fate of his other brother and sisters who were swallowed by Cronus. He was saved by his mother Rhea who tricked Cronus into eating a foal instead, saying that she had given birth to a horse. Poseidon was raised by the Telchines on Rhodes, just as Zeus was raised by the Korybantes on Crete" [9].
              The myths associated with Equuleus
              "Some of the mythologists said that the constellation represented the creature struck by Neptune's (Poseidon) trident from the earth when contesting with Minerva (Athena) for superiority" [Allen, Star Names]:
              "Athena (Minerva) became the patron goddess of the city of Athens, in a competition with Poseidon (Neptune). They agreed that each would give the Athenians one gift and the Athenians would choose whichever gift they preferred. "Neptune struck the ground with his trident and there sprang forth a horse. The gods were filled with wonder at the sight of the noble animal, and when Neptune explained how useful it would be to man, they all thought that the victory would be his. Minerva then produced an olive tree; at this all the gods laughed with scorn, but when the goddess, heedless of their laughter, had explained how all its parts--the wood, the fruit, and the leaves--could be used by man, how it was the sign of peace while the horse was the symbol of war, they decided that Minerva had won, and since her name among the Greeks was Athene, she gave to the city the name of Athens". http://www.sacred-texts.com/time/smd/smd13.htm
              There might be a connection between the Greek words; polis, city, and polos, foal:
              "Graves (1959: I-171) suggests that Athene Polias (‘of the city’) may have originally been Athene Polias (goddess of the local horse cult), from the Greek polos meaning ‘foal’". [http://blacktaj.homestead.com/files/...nd_Gemini.pdf].
              This horse is also said to be Cyllarus (Greek Kullaros), given by Mercury to Castor of whom Ovid describes:
              "[In the battle of the Kentauroi and Lapithes:] Nor did his beauty ransom [centaur] Cyllarus, fighting that day, if hybrids such as he be granted beauty. His beard was just beginning, a golden beard, and golden tresses fell down on his shoulders reaching to his flanks. High-mettled grace shone in his face; his neck, chest, shoulders, hands and every manly part seemed like a sculptor’s much-praised masterpiece. Unblemished too his equine shape, nor less fine than his man’s. With horse’s head and neck he’s make fit mount for Castor, so high stood his chest-muscles, so rideable his back. Jet black he was, the whole of him, save that his tail was white and legs were milk-white too. Many a centauress would be his mate, but one had gained his heart, [she-centaur] Hylonome. In the high woods there was none comelier of all the centaur-girls, and she alone by love and love’s sweet words and winning ways held Cyllarus, yes, and the care she took to look her best (so far as that may be with limbs like that). She combed her glossy hair, and twined her curls in turn with rosemary or violets or roses, and sometimes she wore a pure white lily. Twice a day she bathed her face in the clear brook that fell from Pagasae’s high forest, twice she plunged her body in its flow, nor would she wear on her left side and shoulder any skin but what became her from best-chosen beasts. Their love was equal; on the hills they roamed together, and together they would go back to their cave; and this time too they went into the Lapithae’s palace side by side and side by side were fighting in the fray. A javelin (no knowing from whose hand) came from the left and wounded Cyllarus, landing below the place where the chest joins neck – slight wound, but when the point was pulled away, cold grew his damaged heart and cold his limbs. Hylonome embraced him as he died, caressed the wound and, putting lips to lips, she tried to stay his spirit as it fled. And when she saw him lifeless, she moaned words that in that uproar failed to reach my ears; and fell upon the spear that pierced her love, and, dying, held her husband in her arms." - Ovid, Metamorphoses 12.210 http://www.theoi.com/Georgikos/KentaurisHylonome.html
              In myth the Gemini Twins ride two horses "the immortal steeds Cyllarus and Harpagus" [2]. It seems that Equuleus is Cyllarus, and Harpagus must be Pegasus.
              The two centaur horses, Cyllarus and his wife Hylonome, might relate to these two adjacent constellations Equuleus and Pegasus. Cyllarus is identified with Equuleus. Hylonome 'browser of the woods', is from the district Pagasae, similar to 'pegasus', and 'pagan' etc. (from the root *pag- as explained on the Pegasus page).
              http://www.constellationsofwords.com.../Equuleus.html

              Resources :
              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Equuleus
              https://www.universeguide.com/constellation/equuleus
              https://www.universetoday.com/20711/equuleus/
              http://www.seasky.org/constellations...-equuleus.html
              https://www.britannica.com/topic/Equuleus
              https://in-the-sky.org/data/constellation.php?id=36
              http://www.constellationsofwords.com.../Equuleus.html
              https://www.skyandtelescope.com/obse...-nobody-knows/
              http://rdanderson.com/stargate/glyphs/glyphs.htm
              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stargate_(device)
              http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Glyph
              Special thanks to Vilnisr.
              "I was hoping for another day. Looks like we just got a whole lot more than that. Let's not waste it."

              "Never underestimate your audience. They're generally sensitive, intelligent people who respond positively to quality entertainment."

              "Individual science fiction stories may seem as trivial as ever to the blinder critics and philosophers of today, but the core of science fiction, its essence, has become crucial to our salvation, if we are to be saved at all."

              Comment


                #8
                Glyph 18 – AQUARIUS
                Name and meaning :
                This ancient constellation has been associated with water throughout the Old World. But whether the abundance of water was regarded as a blessing or a curse seems to depend upon geography.
                Greek mythology associates Aquarius with the deluge that wiped out all of humanity except for Deucalion and his wife Pyrrha. Zeus, the king of the gods, unleashed the flood to punish people for their misdeeds, and advised the virtuous Deucalion to save himself by building an ark. This tale of divine retribution strongly parallels the story of the great flood in the Old Testament.
                In ancient Egypt, the constellation Aquarius represented Hapi, the god of the Nile River. This benevolent god distributed the waters of life, and the urn symbolized a fount of good fortune. It’s this association that explains why the Water Bearer is often seen holding the Norma Nilotica – a rod for measuring the depth of the Nile River. Also, the names of Aquarius’ two brightest stars – Sadalmelik and Sadalsuud – reaffirm the idea of providence. The names are thought to mean lucky one of the king and luckiest of the lucky.

                https://earthsky.org/astronomy-essen...-constellation

                In Greek mythology, Aquarius was associated with the cup bearer of the gods – known to serve wine or water to Zeus. For his role, he was immortalized in the stars. In the ancient Greek version of the Deluge Myth, Aquarius was also identified as the one who unleashed the waters that flooded the Earth. As such, the constellation Eridanus was sometimes identified as being a river poured out by Aquarius.
                It may also, together with the constellation Pegasus, be part of the origin of the myth of the Mares of Diomedes, which forms one of The Twelve Labors of Heracles. Its association with pouring out rivers, and the nearby constellation of Capricornus, may be the source of the myth of the Augean stable, which forms another of the labors.
                Aquarius is one of the oldest recognized constellations along the zodiac, the sun’s apparent path through the sky. It is found in a region often called “The Sea” due to its profusion of watery constellations – such as Cetus, Pisces, Eridanus, etc. Sometimes, the river Eridanus is depicted as flowing forth from Aquarius’ watering pot.

                https://www.universetoday.com/19523/aquarius/

                Zeus took a liking to Ganymede, the son of Tros who built Troy. He instructed the boy to become his water bearer. The job had previously been done by Hebe, the daughter of Hera. Hera, Zeus's wife was angered at the relationship between Zeus and Ganymede that she let it be known. In revenge for Zeus glorifying Ganymede, Hera turned Ganymede into the constellation.
                Ganymede is the same character from mythology that the Jupiter moon Ganymede gets its name. Ganymede is the largest moon that orbits Jupiter, the gas giant. In addition to being the largest Jupiter moon, it is the largest moon orbiting any planet in the solar system and its bigger than our moon. Our Moon is the largest in comparison to the planet it orbits.

                https://www.universeguide.com/constellation/aquarius

                Resources :
                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aquarius_(constellation)
                https://www.space.com/21511-aquarius...er-bearer.html
                https://earthsky.org/astronomy-essen...-constellation
                http://www.astronomytrek.com/aquariu...water-carrier/
                http://www.astronomytrek.com/interes...tion-aquarius/
                https://www.123rf.com/photo_83435062...iac-symbo.html
                https://astrologyking.com/constellation-aquarius/
                https://earthsky.org/astronomy-essen...quarid-meteors
                http://rdanderson.com/stargate/glyphs/glyphs.htm
                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stargate_(device)
                http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Glyph
                Special thanks to Vilnisr.

                Glyph 19 – PEGASUS
                Name and meaning :
                The Babylonian constellation IKU (field) had four stars of which three were later part of the Greek constellation Hippos (Pegasus).[2] Pegasus, in Greek mythology, was a winged horse with magical powers. One myth regarding his powers says that his hooves dug out a spring, Hippocrene, which blessed those who drank its water with the ability to write poetry. Pegasus was the one who delivered Medusa's head to Polydectes, after which he travelled to Mount Olympus in order to be the bearer of thunder and lightning for Zeus. Eventually, he became the horse to Bellerophon, who was asked to kill the Chimera and succeeded with the help of Athena and Pegasus. Despite this success, after the death of his children, Bellerophon asked Pegasus to take him to Mount Olympus. Though Pegasus agreed, he plummeted back to Earth after Zeus either threw a thunderbolt at him or made Pegasus buck him off.[3]. Pegasus was also reconised in some myths as the son of the gorgon Medusa and the god Poseidon [4]. In ancient Persia, Pegasus was depicted by al-Sufi as a complete horse facing east, unlike most other uranographers, who had depicted Pegasus as half of a horse, rising out of the ocean. In al-Sufi's depiction, Pegasus's head is made up of the stars of Lacerta the lizard. Its right foreleg is represented by β Peg and its left foreleg is represented by η Peg, μ Peg, and λ Peg; its hind legs are marked by 9 Peg. The back is represented by π Peg and μ Cyg, and the belly is represented by ι Peg and κ Peg.[3]
                In Chinese astronomy, the modern constellation of Pegasus lies in The Black Tortoise of the north (北方玄武), where the stars were classified in several separate asterisms of stars.[5] Epsilon and Theta Pegasi are joined with Alpha Aquarii to form Wei 危 "rooftop", with Theta forming the roof apex.[6]
                In Hindu astronomy, the Great Square of Pegasus contained the 26th and 27th lunar mansions. More specifically, it represented a bedstead that was a resting place for the Moon.[3]
                For the Warrau and Arawak peoples in Guyana the stars in the Great Square, corresponding to parts of Pegasus and of Andromeda, represented a barbecue, taken up to the sky by the seven hunters of the myth of Siritjo.
                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pegasus_(constellation)

                In Greek mythology, Pegasus is a white winged horse that sprang from the neck of the Gorgon Medusa when Perseus beheaded her. Medusa was a beautiful young woman before she was turned into a monster by the goddess Athena after being caught being defiled by the sea god Poseidon in the goddess’ temple. Athena turned Medusa’s hair into snakes and made her face so ugly that anyone who looked at her immediately turned to stone.
                Perseus was sent to kill Medusa by King Polydectes of Seriphus, who was the brother of Dictys, the man who took Perseus and his mother Danaë in and raised Perseus as his own son. Polydectes wanted Danaë for himself and Perseus stood in his way because he defended his mother from the king’s advances. He did not expect the hero to come back from his mission alive.
                When Perseus killed Medusa, Pegasus and the warrior Chrysaor sprang from her neck, both of them offspring of Poseidon.
                The name Pegasus is derived from the Greek pegai which means “springs” or “waters,” and Chrysaor’s name means “the golden sword.”
                When he was born, Pegasus flew away to Mount Helicon in Boeotia, where the Muses lived, and he befriended them. He created a spring that was named Hippocrene by striking the ground with his hoof. The name Hippocrene means “the horse’s fountain.” It was said that those who drank from the spring were blessed with the gift to write poetry.
                The most famous myth involving Pegasus is the one of Bellerophon, the hero who was sent by King Iobates of Lycia to kill the Chimaera, a monster that breathed fire and was devastating the king’s land. Bellerophon found Pegasus and tamed him using a golden bridle given to him by the goddess Athena. Then he swooped down on the Chimaera from the sky and killed the monster with his lance and arrows. After this and several other heroic deeds for King Iobates, Bellerophon let the successes get to his head. Riding Pegasus, he tried to fly to Olympus and join the gods. He didn’t succeed. He fell off the horse and back to Earth.
                Pegasus did however make it to Olympus. There, Zeus used the horse to carry his thunder and lightning, and eventually placed him among the constellations. The constellation Pegasus is depicted with only the top half of the horse, and it is nevertheless one of the largest constellations in the sky, seventh in size.
                https://www.constellation-guide.com/...constellation/


                Resources :
                http://www.astronomytrek.com/explori...ation-pegasus/
                https://astrologyking.com/constellation-pegasus/
                https://stardate.org/astro-guide/pegasus-flying-horse-0
                https://study.com/academy/lesson/peg...-for-kids.html
                https://infograph.venngage.com/p/840...lation-project
                https://seeklogo.com/vector-logo/131...rgate-atlantis
                http://astound.us/artists/liz-forest...-constellation
                http://www.derekscope.co.uk/constellation-20th/pegasus/
                http://rdanderson.com/stargate/glyphs/glyphs.htm
                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stargate_(device)
                http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Glyph
                Special thanks to Vilnisr.
                "I was hoping for another day. Looks like we just got a whole lot more than that. Let's not waste it."

                "Never underestimate your audience. They're generally sensitive, intelligent people who respond positively to quality entertainment."

                "Individual science fiction stories may seem as trivial as ever to the blinder critics and philosophers of today, but the core of science fiction, its essence, has become crucial to our salvation, if we are to be saved at all."

                Comment


                  #9
                  Glyph 20 – SCULPTOR
                  Name and meaning :
                  Sculptor constellation is not associated with any myths. It is one of the southern constellations introduced by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille in 1751-1752. On his planisphere of 1756, Lacaille named the constellation l’Atelier du Sculpteur, which is French for “the sculptor’s studio.” The constellation was depicted as a carved head lying on a tripod table, next to a sculptor’s mallet and two chisels.
                  The name was Latinized to Apparatus Sculptoris on Lacaille’s 1763 planisphere and in 1844 the English astronomer John Herschel proposed shortening the name to Sculptor. His suggestion was adopted by Francis Baily in his British Association Catalogue of 1845, and the constellation has been known as Sculptor ever since.
                  https://www.constellation-guide.com/...constellation/


                  Resources :
                  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sculptor_(constellation)
                  https://www.astronomytrek.com/star-c...acts-sculptor/
                  https://www.universeguide.com/constellation/sculptor
                  http://www.ianridpath.com/startales/sculptor.htm
                  http://www.astronomytrek.com/star-co...on-facts-grus/
                  http://www.seasky.org/constellations...-sculptor.html
                  http://rdanderson.com/stargate/glyphs/glyphs.htm
                  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stargate_(device)
                  http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Glyph
                  Special thanks to Vilnisr.

                  *******

                  Glyph 21 – PISCES
                  Name and meaning :
                  Venus and her son Cupid while sitting on the bank of the Euphrates suddenly saw Typhon, the enemy of the Gods, approaching them. They leapt into the river and were saved from drowning by two fishes, who were afterwards placed in the heavens by Venus in gratitude for their help.
                  Ptolemy makes the following observations: “Those stars in Pisces which are in the head of the southern fish have the same influence as Mercury, and, in some degree, as Saturn: those in the body are like Jupiter and Mercury: those in the tail and in the southern line are like Saturn, and, moderately, like Mercury. In the northern fish, those on its body and backbone resemble Jupiter, and also Venus in some degree: those in the northern line are like Saturn and Jupiter.” By the Kabalists Pisces is associated with the Hebrew letter Pé and the 17th Tarot Trump “The Stars.” [1]
                  Pisces, the Fishes…The figures are widely separated in the sky, the northeastern one lying just south of beta Andromedae, headed towards it, and the southwestern one east from and headed towards Aquarius and Pegasus, the lucida (Alrisha) marking the knot of the connecting bands. Both are north of the ecliptic, the first culminating on the 28th of November, and the second about three weeks earlier. In early days they were shown close together, one above the other, but in reversed directions, although united as now.
                  By reason of precession this constellation is now the first of the zodiac, but entirely within its boundaries lies the sign Aries; the vernal equinox being located in a comparatively starless region south of omega in the tail of the southwestern Fish, and about 2° west of “a line from alpha Andromedae through gamma Pegasi continued as far again.” This equinoctial point is known as the First of Aries, and the Greenwich of the Sky; and from their containing it, the Fishes are called the Leaders of the Celestial Host…
                  The 26th nakshatra, Revati, Abundant or Wealthy, lay here in the thirty-two stars from zeta northwards, figured as a Drum or Tabor. But the manzil (Moon Mansion), Batn al Hut, the Fish’s Belly, or Al Risha’, the Cord, and the corresponding sieu, Koei, or Kwei, Striding Legs, were formed by sixteen stars in a figure 8 from psi Piscium to nu Andromeda, and mainly lay in this constellation, although beta and zeta, in Andromeda seem to have been their determinant points. All of these stations, however, may have been even more extended, for there certainly is “a perplexing disagreement in detail among the three systems.”
                  Al Biruni asserted that “the name of the sign in all languages signifies only one fish,” and it is probable that the original asterism was such, for, according to Eratosthenes, it symbolized the great Syrian goddess Derke or Derketo, and so, later, was named Dea Syria, Dercis, Dercetis, Dercete, Proles Dercia, and Phacetis…But the Greeks confounded this divinity with another Syrian goddess, Astarte, identified with Aphrodite (Venus), who precipitated herself, with her son Eros (Cupid), into the Euphrates when frightened by the attack of the monster Typhon; these becoming two fishes that afterwards were placed in the zodiac. Latin classical authors, with the same groundwork of the story, made Pisces the fishes that carried Venus and her boy out of danger, so that, as Manilius said, Venus owed her Safety to their Shape. The constellation was thus known as Venus et Cupido, Venus Syria cum Cupidine, Venus cum Adone, Dione, and Veneris Mater; and it has been Ourania and Urania, the Sarmatian Aphrodite Gad the Marauder…
                  In early astrology the constellation appropriately was under the care of the sea-god Neptune, and so the Neptuni Sidus of Manilius; and it was the Exaltation of Venus…Thus it naturally ruled the Euphrates, Tigris, and the Red Sea, and Parthia; but in later days was assigned to the guardianship of Jupiter, whose House it was, reigning over Egypt, Calabria, Galicia, Normandy, Portugal, Spain, and Ratisbon. It was predominant in influence with mariners, and had charge of the human feet; the designated color being a glistening white, as of fish just out of the water; and it was fruitful, like its namesakes, for, according to Manilius. “Pisces fill the Flood.”
                  Ptolemy distinguished the members of the constellation as epomenos,” the rear or eastern,” and egoumenos, “the front or western “; the Southern Fish being his notios; a precaution rendered necessary by the frequent confounding of these three by classical writers. A notable instance of this is seen in the Poeticon Astronomicon, where our Pisces are made to receive the water from the Urn. In Humboldt’s Cosmos they are Pisces Boreales. The constellation is popularly thought to have taken its name from its coincidence with the sun during the rainy season; and the symbol for the sign, , to represent the two Fishes joined; but Sayce thinks it the Hittite determinative affix of plurality. [2]
                  The folk engendered by the two Fishes, the last of the signs, will possess a love of the sea: they will entrust their lives to the deep, will provide ships or gear for ships and everything that the sea requires for activity connected with it. The consequent skills are numberless: so many are the components of even a small ship that there are scarcely enough names for things. There is also the art of navigation, which has reached out to the stars and binds the sea to heaven. The pilot must have sound knowledge of the earth, its rivers and havens, its climate and winds; how on the one hand to ply the mobile helm this way and that, and brake the ship and spread apart the waves, and how on the other to drive the ship by rowing and to feather the lingering blades. The Fishes further impart to their son the desire to sweep tranquil waters with dragnets and to display on shores which are their own the captive peoples of the deep, either by hiding the hook within the bait or the guile within the weel. Naval warfare too is of their gift, battles afloat, and blood-stained waves at sea. The children of this sign are endowed with fertile offspring, a friendly disposition, swiftness of movement, and lives in which everything is ever apt to change. [3]
                  The Sign is pictured as two large fishes bound together by a Band, the ends of which are fastened separately to their tails. One fish is represented with its head pointing upwards towards the North Polar Star, the other is shown at right angles, swimming along the line of the ecliptic, or path of the sun. The ancient Egyptian name, as shown on the Denderah Zodiac, is Pi-cot Orion, or Pisces Hori, which means the fishes of Him that cometh.
                  The Hebrew name is Dagim, the Fishes, which is closely connected with multitudes, as in Genesis 48:26, where Jacob blesses Joseph’s sons, and says, “Let them grow into a multitude in the midst of the earth.” The margin says, “Let them grow as fishes do increase.” It refers to the fulfilment of Genesis 1:28, “Be fruitful and multiply.” The multitude of Abraham’s seed is prominent in the pronouncement of the blessings, where God compared his future posterity to the stars of the sky, and the sand upon the sea shore. “A very great multitude of fish,” as in Ezekiel 47:9. The Syriac name is Nuno, the fish, lengthened out (as in posterity).
                  Indeed, this sign of PISCES has always been interpreted of Israel. Both Jews and Gentiles have agreed in this. ABARBANEL, a Jewish commentator, writing on Daniel, affirms that the Sign PISCES always refers to the people of Israel. He gives five reasons for this belief, and also affirms that a conjunction of the planets Jupiter and Saturn always betokens a crisis in the affairs of Israel. Because such a conjunction took place in his day (about 1480 AD) he looked for the coming of Messiah…
                  But why two fishes? and why is one horizontal and the other perpendicular?…The fish, shooting upwards to the Polar Star, exquisitely pictures this “heavenly calling”; while the other fish, keeping on the horizontal line, answers to those who were content with an earthly portion. [4]
                  https://astrologyking.com/constellation-pisces/

                  The word Pisces is the Latin plural for “fish”. It is one of the constellations first cataloged by the Greek astronomer Ptolemy in the second century. The constellation is represented as a pair of fish facing in opposite directions, connected at the tail by a common star. In ancient times, the two fish were shown swimming together. In Greek mythology, the two fish represent Venus and. It was believe that they transformed into fish in order to escape the monster Typhon. Typhon was sent by Gaia, the Earth mother, to defeat the gods. Pan saw the monster coming and turned himself into a goat-fish and jumped into the river Euphrates to escape. He became the constellation Capricornus. The goddess Aphrodite and her son Eros (Venus and Cupid) then jumped into the river to escape the monster. They were then transformed into the two fish.

                  http://www.seasky.org/constellations...on-pisces.html

                  Resources :
                  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pisces_(constellation)
                  http://www.astronomytrek.com/pisces/
                  https://in-the-sky.org/data/constellation.php?id=67
                  https://www.solarsystemquick.com/uni...stellation.htm
                  https://www.stockunlimited.com/vecto...n_1964125.html
                  https://www.dkfindout.com/us/space/c...ations/pisces/
                  http://rdanderson.com/stargate/glyphs/glyphs.htm
                  https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stargate_(device)
                  http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Glyph
                  Special thanks to Vilnisr.
                  "I was hoping for another day. Looks like we just got a whole lot more than that. Let's not waste it."

                  "Never underestimate your audience. They're generally sensitive, intelligent people who respond positively to quality entertainment."

                  "Individual science fiction stories may seem as trivial as ever to the blinder critics and philosophers of today, but the core of science fiction, its essence, has become crucial to our salvation, if we are to be saved at all."

                  Comment


                    #10
                    Glyph 22 – ANDROMEDA
                    Name and meaning :
                    The uranography of Andromeda has its roots most firmly in the Greek tradition, though a female figure in Andromeda's location had appeared earlier in Babylonian astronomy. The stars that make up Pisces and the middle portion of modern Andromeda formed a constellation representing a fertility goddess, sometimes named as Anunitum or the Lady of the Heavens.[7]
                    Andromeda is known as "the Chained Lady" or "the Chained Woman" in English. It was known as Mulier Catenata ("chained woman") in Latin and al-Mar'at al Musalsalah in Arabic.[2] It has also been called Persea ("Perseus's wife") or Cepheis ("Cepheus's daughter"),[2][8] all names that refer to Andromeda's role in the Greco-Roman myth of Perseus, in which Cassiopeia, the queen of Ethiopia, bragged that her daughter was more beautiful than the Nereids, sea nymphs blessed with incredible beauty.[9] Offended at her remark, the nymphs petitioned Poseidon to punish Cassiopeia for her insolence, which he did by commanding the sea monster Cetus to attack Ethiopia.[9] Andromeda's panicked father, Cepheus, was told by the Oracle of Ammon that the only way to save his kingdom was to sacrifice his daughter to Cetus.[10][11] She was chained to a rock by the sea but was saved by the hero Perseus, who in one version of the story used the head of Medusa to turn the monster into stone;[12] in another version, by the Roman poet Ovid in his Metamorphoses, Perseus slew the monster with his diamond sword.[11] Perseus and Andromeda then married; the myth recounts that the couple had nine children together – seven sons and two daughters – and founded Mycenae and its Persideae dynasty. After Andromeda's death Athena placed her in the sky as a constellation, to honor her. Several of the neighboring constellations (Perseus, Cassiopeia, Cetus, and Cepheus) also represent characters in the Perseus myth.[10] It is connected with the constellation Pegasus.
                    Andromeda was one of the original 48 constellations formulated by Ptolemy in his 2nd-century Almagest, in which it was defined as a specific pattern of stars. She is typically depicted with α Andromedae as her head, ο and λ Andromedae as her chains, and δ, π, μ, Β, and γ Andromedae representing her body and legs. However, there is no universal depiction of Andromeda and the stars used to represent her body, head, and chains.[13] Arab astronomers were aware of Ptolemy's constellations, but they included a second constellation representing a fish at Andromeda's feet.[14] Several stars from Andromeda and most of the stars in Lacerta were combined in 1787 by German astronomer Johann Bode to form Frederici Honores (also called Friedrichs Ehre). It was designed to honor King Frederick II of Prussia, but quickly fell into disuse.[15] Since the time of Ptolemy, Andromeda has remained a constellation and is officially recognized by the International Astronomical Union, although like all modern constellations, it is now defined as a specific region of the sky that includes both Ptolemy's pattern and the surrounding stars.[16][17] In 1922, the IAU defined its recommended three-letter abbreviation, "And".[18] The official boundaries of Andromeda were defined in 1930 by Eugène Delporte as a polygon of 36 segments. Its right ascension is between 22h 57.5m and 2h 39.3m and its declination is between 53.19° and 21.68° in the equatorial coordinate system.[3]


                    In traditional Chinese astronomy, nine stars from Andromeda (including Beta Andromedae, Mu Andromedae, and Nu Andromedae), along with seven stars from Pisces, formed an elliptical constellation called "Legs" (奎宿). This constellation either represented the foot of a walking person or a wild boar.[11] Gamma Andromedae and its neighbors were called "Teen Ta Tseang Keun" (天大将军, heaven's great general), representing honor in astrology and a great general in mythology.[8][11] Alpha Andromedae and Gamma Pegasi together made "Wall" (壁宿), representing the eastern wall of the imperial palace and/or the emperor's personal library. For the Chinese, the northern swath of Andromeda formed a stable for changing horses (tianjiu, 天厩, stable on sky) and the far western part, along with most of Lacerta, became Tengshe, a flying snake.[11]
                    An Arab constellation called "al-Hut" (the fish) was composed of several stars in Andromeda, M31, and several stars in Pisces. ν And, μ And, β And, η And, ζ And, ε And, δ And, π And, and 32 And were all included from Andromeda; ν Psc, φ Psc, χ Psc, and ψ Psc were included from Pisces.[14]
                    Hindu legends surrounding Andromeda are similar to the Greek myths. Ancient Sanskrit texts depict Antarmada chained to a rock, as in the Greek myth. Scholars believe that the Hindu and Greek astrological myths were closely linked; one piece of evidence cited is the similarity between the names "Antarmada" and "Andromeda".[8]
                    Andromeda is also associated with the Mesopotamian creation story of Tiamat, the goddess of Chaos. She bore many demons for her husband, Apsu, but eventually decided to destroy them in a war that ended when Marduk killed her. He used her body to create the constellations as markers of time for humans.[8][13]
                    In the Marshall Islands, Andromeda, Cassiopeia, Triangulum, and Aries are incorporated into a constellation representing a porpoise. Andromeda's bright stars are mostly in the body of the porpoise; Cassiopeia represents its tail and Aries its head.[13] In the Tuamotu islands, Alpha Andromedae was called Takurua-e-te-tuki-hanga-ruki, meaning "Star of the wearisome toil",[19] and Beta Andromedae was called Piringa-o-Tautu.[20]
                    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andromeda_(constellation)

                    In Greek mythology, Andromeda was the daughter of King Cepheus of Ethiopia and Queen Cassiopeia, who offended the Nereids (sea nymphs) by claiming she was more beautiful than they were.
                    The nymphs complained to the sea god Poseidon and he sent a sea monster, Cetus, to flood and destroy Cepheus’ lands as punishment for his wife’s boastfulness. When the king sought advice from the Oracle of Ammon on how to prevent complete destruction of his lands, he was told that the only way to appease the gods and nymphs was to sacrifice his daughter to Cetus. Subsequently, Andromeda was chained to a rock and would have been left to the monster if Perseus had not come along and saved her. The two were later married and had six children, including Gorgophonte, who fathered Tyndareus, the famous Spartan king, and Perses, who was an ancestor of the Persians.
                    In the story, it was the goddess Athena who commemorated the princess Andromeda by placing her image among the stars, next to the constellations representing her husband Perseus and mother Cassiopeia.
                    https://www.constellation-guide.com/...constellation/



                    Resources :
                    https://www.universetoday.com/19518/andromeda/
                    https://in-the-sky.org/data/constellation.php?id=2
                    http://www.astronomytrek.com/interes...ion-andromeda/
                    https://www.universeguide.com/constellation/andromeda
                    http://www.seasky.org/constellations...andromeda.html
                    http://www.derekscope.co.uk/constell...0th/andromeda/
                    http://rdanderson.com/stargate/glyphs/glyphs.htm
                    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stargate_(device)
                    http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Glyph
                    Special thanks to @Vilnisr.

                    Glyph 23 - TRIANGULUM
                    Name and meaning :
                    In the Babylonian star catalogues, Triangulum, together with Gamma Andromedae, formed the constellation known as MULAPIN , "The Plough". It is notable as the first constellation presented on (and giving its name to) a pair of tablets containing canonical star lists that were compiled around 1000 BC, the MUL.APIN. The Plough was the first constellation of the "Way of Enlil"—that is, the northernmost quarter of the Sun's path, which corresponds to the 45 days on either side of summer solstice. Its first appearance in the pre-dawn sky (heliacal rising) in February marked the time to begin spring ploughing in Mesopotamia.[2]
                    The Ancient Greeks called Triangulum Deltoton (Δελτωτόν), as the constellation resembled an upper-case Greek letter delta (Δ). It was transliterated by Roman writers, then later Latinised as Deltotum.[3] Eratosthenes linked it with the Nile Delta, while the Roman writer Hyginus associated it with the triangular island of Sicily, formerly known as Trinacria due to its shape.[4] It was also called Sicilia, because the Romans believed Ceres, patron goddess of Sicily, begged Jupiter to place the island in the heavens.[3] Greek astronomers such as Hipparchos and Ptolemy called it Trigonon (Τρίγωνον), and later, it was Romanized as Trigonum. Other names referring to its shape include Tricuspis and Triquetrum.[3] Alpha and Beta Trianguli were called Al Mīzān, which is Arabic for "The Scale Beam".[5] In Chinese astronomy, Gamma Andromedae and neighbouring stars including Beta, Gamma and Delta Trianguli were called Teen Ta Tseang Keun (天大将军, "Heaven's great general"), representing honour in astrology and a great general in mythology.[4][6]
                    Later, the 17th-century German celestial cartographer Johann Bayer called the constellation Triplicitas and Orbis terrarum tripertitus, for the three regions Europe, Asia, and Africa. Triangulus Septentrionalis was a name used to distinguish it from Triangulum Australe, the Southern Triangle.[3] Polish astronomer Johannes Hevelius excised three faint stars—6, 10 and 12 Trianguli—to form the new constellation of Triangulum Minus in his 1690 Firmamentum Sobiescianum, renaming the original as Triangulum Majus.[7] The smaller constellation was not recognised by the International Astronomical Union (IAU) when the constellations were established in the 1920s.[5]
                    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Triangulum

                    The Greeks knew the constellation as Deltoton, named for its shape, which resembled the capital Greek letter delta. Eratosthenes said that the constellation represented the delta of the river Nile, and Hyginus wrote that some people saw it as the island of Sicily. Sicilia was one of the early names for the constellation because Ceres, who was the patron goddess of the island, was said to have begged Jupiter to place the island in the sky.
                    The Babylonians saw Triangulum and the star Gamma Andromedae in Andromeda constellation as a constellation called MUL.Apin, or the Plough.
                    The Polish astronomer Johannes Hevelius introduced a smaller triangle, Triangulum Minus, in 1687, formed by three stars located near Triangulum, but the division soon fell into disuse.
                    https://www.constellation-guide.com/...constellation/


                    Resources :
                    http://www.astronomytrek.com/star-co...ts-triangulum/
                    https://www.universetoday.com/24032/triangulum/
                    https://www.universeguide.com/constellation/triangulum
                    http://www.ianridpath.com/startales/triangulum.htm
                    https://in-the-sky.org/data/constellation.php?id=82
                    http://rdanderson.com/stargate/glyphs/glyphs.htm
                    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stargate_(device)
                    http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Glyph
                    Special thanks to @Vilnisr.
                    "I was hoping for another day. Looks like we just got a whole lot more than that. Let's not waste it."

                    "Never underestimate your audience. They're generally sensitive, intelligent people who respond positively to quality entertainment."

                    "Individual science fiction stories may seem as trivial as ever to the blinder critics and philosophers of today, but the core of science fiction, its essence, has become crucial to our salvation, if we are to be saved at all."

                    Comment


                      #11
                      Glyph 24 – ARIES
                      Name and meaning :
                      Aries is now recognized as an official constellation, albeit as a specific region of the sky, by the International Astronomical Union. It was originally defined in ancient texts as a specific pattern of stars, and has remained a constellation since ancient times; it now includes the ancient pattern as well as the surrounding stars.[4] In the description of the Babylonian zodiac given in the clay tablets known as the MUL.APIN, the constellation now known as Aries was the final station along the ecliptic. The MUL.APIN was a comprehensive table of the risings and settings of stars, which likely served as an agricultural calendar. Modern-day Aries was known as MULLÚ.ḪUN.GÁ, "The Agrarian Worker" or "The Hired Man".[5] Although likely compiled in the 12th or 11th century BC, the MUL.APIN reflects a tradition which marks the Pleiades as the vernal equinox, which was the case with some precision at the beginning of the Middle Bronze Age. The earliest identifiable reference to Aries as a distinct constellation comes from the boundary stones that date from 1350 to 1000 BC. On several boundary stones, a zodiacal ram figure is distinct from the other characters present. The shift in identification from the constellation as the Agrarian Worker to the Ram likely occurred in later Babylonian tradition because of its growing association with Dumuzi the Shepherd. By the time the MUL.APIN was created—by 1000 BC—modern Aries was identified with both Dumuzi's ram and a hired laborer. The exact timing of this shift is difficult to determine due to the lack of images of Aries or other ram figures.[6]
                      In ancient Egyptian astronomy, Aries was associated with the god Amon-Ra, who was depicted as a man with a ram's head and represented fertility and creativity. Because it was the location of the vernal equinox, it was called the "Indicator of the Reborn Sun".[7] During the times of the year when Aries was prominent, priests would process statues of Amon-Ra to temples, a practice that was modified by Persian astronomers centuries later. Aries acquired the title of "Lord of the Head" in Egypt, referring to its symbolic and mythological importance.[8]


                      Aries was not fully accepted as a constellation until classical times.[9] In Hellenistic astrology, the constellation of Aries is associated with the golden ram of Greek mythology that rescued Phrixus and Helle on orders from Hermes, taking Phrixus to the land of Colchis.[10][11][12] Phrixos and Helle were the son and daughter of King Athamas and his first wife Nephele. The king's second wife, Ino, was jealous and wished to kill his children. To accomplish this, she induced a famine in Boeotia, then falsified a message from the Oracle of Delphi that said Phrixos must be sacrificed to end the famine. Athamas was about to sacrifice his son atop Mount Laphystium when Aries, sent by Nephele, arrived.[13] Helle fell off of Aries's back in flight and drowned in the Dardanelles, also called the Hellespont in her honor. After arriving, Phrixus sacrificed the ram to Zeus and gave the Fleece to Aeëtes of Colchis, who rewarded him with an engagement to his daughter Chalciope. Aeëtes hung its skin in a sacred place where it became known as the Golden Fleece and was guarded by a dragon.[3][10] In a later myth, this Golden Fleece was stolen by Jason and the Argonauts.[12]
                      Historically, Aries has been depicted as a crouched, wingless ram with its head turned towards Taurus. Ptolemy asserted in his Almagest that Hipparchus depicted Alpha Arietis as the ram's muzzle, though Ptolemy did not include it in his constellation figure. Instead, it was listed as an "unformed star", and denoted as "the star over the head". John Flamsteed, in his Atlas Coelestis, followed Ptolemy's description by mapping it above the figure's head.[13][14] Flamsteed followed the general convention of maps by depicting Aries lying down.[7] Astrologically, Aries has been associated with the head and its humors.[15] It was strongly associated with Mars, both the planet and the god. It was considered to govern Western Europe and Syria, and to indicate a strong temper in a person.[16]
                      The First Point of Aries, the location of the vernal equinox, is named for the constellation. This is because the Sun crossed the celestial equator from south to north in Aries more than two millennia ago. Hipparchus defined it in 130 BC. as a point south of Gamma Arietis. Because of the precession of the equinoxes, the First Point of Aries has since moved into Pisces and will move into Aquarius by around 2600 AD. The Sun now appears in Aries from late April through mid May, though the constellation is still associated with the beginning of spring.[11][13][17]
                      Medieval Muslim astronomers depicted Aries in various ways. Astronomers like al-Sufi saw the constellation as a ram, modeled on the precedent of Ptolemy. However, some Islamic celestial globes depicted Aries as a nondescript four-legged animal with what may be antlers instead of horns.[18] Some early Bedouin observers saw a ram elsewhere in the sky; this constellation featured the Pleiades as the ram's tail.[19] The generally accepted Arabic formation of Aries consisted of thirteen stars in a figure along with five "unformed" stars, four of which were over the animal's hindquarters and one of which was the disputed star over Aries's head.[20] Al-Sufi's depiction differed from both other Arab astronomers' and Flamsteed's, in that his Aries was running and looking behind itself.[7]
                      The obsolete constellations introduced in Aries (Musca Borealis, Lilium, Vespa, and Apes) have all been composed of the northern stars.[21] Musca Borealis was created from the stars 33 Arietis, 35 Arietis, 39 Arietis, and 41 Arietis.[22] In 1612, Petrus Plancius introduced Apes, a constellation representing a bee. In 1624, the same stars were used by Jakob Bartsch to create a constellation called Vespa, representing a wasp. In 1679 Augustin Royer used these stars for his constellation Lilium, representing the fleur-de-lis. None of these constellation became widely accepted. Johann Hevelius renamed the constellation "Musca" in 1690 in his Firmamentum Sobiescianum. To differentiate it from Musca, the southern fly, it was later renamed Musca Borealis but it did not gain acceptance and its stars were ultimately officially reabsorbed into Aries.[22]
                      In 1922, the International Astronomical Union defined its recommended three-letter abbreviation, "Ari".[1] The official boundaries of Aries were defined in 1930 by Eugène Delporte as a polygon of 12 segments. Its right ascension is between 1h 46.4m and 3h 29.4m and its declination is between 10.36° and 31.22° in the equatorial coordinate system.[23]

                      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aries_(constellation)

                      In Greek mythology, Aries represents the ram whose fleece was sought by Jason and the Argonauts. When King Athamus of Boetia took a second wife, Ino, she was resentful of his existing children, especially his son, Phrixus, and she wanted him sacrificed. Zeus responded to the pleadings of Phrixus' mother, Nephele, by sending a golden ram to save Phrixus and his sister Helle. Helle did not survive but Phrixus did and sacrificed the ram to Zeus and gave its golden fleece to King Aettes. The fleece was eventually stolen by Jason.
                      In astrology, which is not a science, Aries is the first sign of the Zodiac, marking the beginning of the astrological year and representing those born between March 21 and April 19. It is a sun sign and traits of those born under the sign include leadership and assertiveness.
                      — Kim Ann Zimmermann

                      https://www.space.com/17052-aries-constellation.html

                      Babylonians identified Aries as the agrarian worker, the last stop on the ecliptic. The name of the constellation later changed to Ram, but why Babylonians changed it is uncertain. In the 7th century BC, Neo-Babylonians did a revision of the Babylonian zodiac that placed Alpha Arietis, Hamal, very close to the vernal equinox, which is how Aries came to be so prominent among the zodiac signs in astrology.
                      In those times, Aries contained the equinox, the point at which the Sun crosses the celestial equator from north to south. Because of precession (slow wobble of Earth’s axis), the vernal equinox is no longer in Aries, but in Pisces. In 130 BC, however, it was located just south of Gamma Arietis (Mesarthim) and was taken to be the starting point of the zodiac.

                      In Greek myth, Aries is identified with the golden ram that rescued Phrixus and took him to Colchis, where he sacrificed the ram to the gods. The ram’s skin that he placed in a temple was the Golden Fleece, which later appears in the story of Jason and the Argonauts.
                      Phrixus was the son of a Boeotian king. He had a twin sister, Helle. The children had a stepmother, Ino, who hated them and wanted to get rid of them. She came up with a plan to put the land of the brink of famine by making sure the wheat crops failed. When a man was sent to consult the Oracle at Delphi, Ino bribed him to lie and say the Oracle asked for the king’s children to be sacrificed if they did not want the people to starve.
                      Phrixus and Helle were about to die when a winged ram with golden wool came to their rescue. The ram was sent by their real mother, the cloud nymph Nephele. It took both children and flew east to Colchis. Only Phrixus survived the journey. Helle fell off the ram and drowned in the Dardanelles. The strait was later renamed to Hellespont, or sea of Helle, in her memory.
                      Phrixus was welcomed by King Aeëtes of Colchis, to whom he presented the Golden Fleece. In return, the king gave Phrixus his daughter Chalciope’s hand.

                      https://www.constellation-guide.com/...constellation/



                      Resources :
                      http://rdanderson.com/stargate/glyphs/glyphs.htm
                      https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stargate_(device)
                      http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Glyph
                      https://www.universetoday.com/19603/aries/
                      https://earthsky.org/constellations/...-constellation
                      http://www.astronomytrek.com/aries-the-ram/
                      http://www.seasky.org/constellations...ion-aries.html
                      https://www.heavens-above.com/myth.aspx?con=ari
                      https://www.universeguide.com/constellation/aries
                      https://www.pinterest.com/pin/507077239274904762/
                      http://www.crystalinks.com/aries.html

                      Special thanks to @Vilnisr.
                      "I was hoping for another day. Looks like we just got a whole lot more than that. Let's not waste it."

                      "Never underestimate your audience. They're generally sensitive, intelligent people who respond positively to quality entertainment."

                      "Individual science fiction stories may seem as trivial as ever to the blinder critics and philosophers of today, but the core of science fiction, its essence, has become crucial to our salvation, if we are to be saved at all."

                      Comment


                        #12
                        Glyph 25 – PERSEUS
                        Name and meaning :
                        The constellation of Perseus may be derived from the Babylonian Old Man (MUL.SHU.GI) constellation, then associated with East in the MUL.APIN—an astronomical compilation dating to around 1000 BCE.[6] In Greek mythology, Perseus was the son of Danaë, who was sent by King Polydectes to bring the head of Medusa the Gorgon — whose visage caused all who gazed upon her to turn to stone. Perseus slew Medusa in her sleep, and Pegasus and Chrysaor appeared from her body.[7] Perseus continued to the realm of Cepheus whose daughter Andromeda was to be sacrificed to Cetus the sea monster.
                        Perseus rescued Andromeda from the monster by killing it with his diamond sword.[8] He turned Polydectes and his followers to stone with Medusa's head and appointed Dictys the fisherman king.[7] Perseus and Andromeda married and had six children.[8] In the sky, Perseus lies near the constellations Andromeda, Cepheus, Cassiopeia (Andromeda's mother), Cetus, and Pegasus.[7]
                        Four Chinese constellations are contained in the area of the sky identified with Perseus in the West. Tiānchuán (天船), the Celestial Boat, was the third paranatellon (A star or constellation which rises at the same time as another star or object[9]) of the third house of the White Tiger of the West, representing the boats that Chinese people were reminded to build in case of a catastrophic flood season. Incorporating stars from the northern part of the constellation, it contained Mu, Delta, Psi, Alpha, Gamma and Eta Persei.[10] Jīshuǐ (積水), the Swollen Waters, was the fourth paranatellon of the aforementioned house, representing the potential of unusually high floods during the end of August and beginning of September at the beginning of the flood season. Lambda and possibly Mu Persei lay within it.[11] Dàlíng (大陵), the Great Trench, was the fifth paranatellon of that house, representing the trenches where criminals executed en masse in August were interred. It was formed by Kappa, Omega, Rho, 24, 17 and 15 Persei. The pile of corpses prior to their interment was represented by Jīshī (積屍, Pi Persei), the sixth paranatellon of the house.[11] The Double Cluster, h and Chi Persei, had special significance in Chinese astronomy.
                        In Polynesia, Perseus was not commonly recognized as a separate constellation; the only people that named it were those of the Society Islands, who called it Faa-iti, meaning "Little Valley".[12] Algol may have been named Matohi by the Māori people, but the evidence for this identification is disputed. Matohi ("Split") occasionally came into conflict with Tangaroa-whakapau over which of them should appear in the sky, the outcome affecting the tides. It matches the Maori description of a blue-white star near Aldebaran but does not disappear as the myth would indicate.[13]

                        https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perseus_(constellation)

                        The constellation Perseus represents the Greek hero Perseus in the sky and is one of the six constellations associated with the myth of Perseus. Perseus was the son of Danaë, daughter of King Acrisius. Acrisius ruled Argos and after an oracle foretold him that he would die at the hand of his own grandson, he had locked away Danaë in a dungeon. Zeus fell in love with her and took the form of golden rain to visit her. When the rain fell into her lap, Danaë got pregnant. Acrisius found out about the pregnancy and, once Perseus was born, the king locked both his daughter and grandson into a wooden chest and cast them out to sea.
                        Danaë prayed to Zeus and the god heard her. The chest washed ashore within a few days, and Perseus and his mother found themselves on the island of Seriphos. A fisherman called Dictys found them and took them home with him. He raised Perseus as his own son.
                        However, their troubles did not end there. Dictys had a brother, King Polydectes, who wanted Danaë for himself. Perseus defended her from the king’s advances and Polydectes came up with a plan that would put Perseus out of the picture. He made up a story about being engaged to another woman, Hippodameia, who was the daughter of King Oenomaus of Elis. He asked everyone to give him and his bride horses as a wedding present. Since Perseus did not have any horses and could not afford to buy one, the king sent the youngster to bring him the head of the Gorgon Medusa.
                        Medusa was one of the three hideous sisters, who had tusks, hands of brass, golden wings, and faces covered with dragon scales. They were daughters of the sea god Phorcys and his sister Ceto. Their gaze could turn anyone who looked at them into stone.
                        Medusa was the only mortal sister. She had been condemned to a life of ugliness by the goddess Athena after Poseidon had ravished Medusa in the goddess’ temple. Before the curse, she was known for her beauty, especially of her hair. Once cursed, she had snakes for hair, which made her distinguishable from the other two Gorgons.
                        Polydectes expected Perseus to die in the attempt to kill the Gorgon, but he underestimated Perseus’ allies on Olympus. Athena gave the hero a bronze shield and Hephaestus made him a sword of diamond. Hades gave him a helmet that made him invisible, and Hermes gifted him with winged sandals.
                        Helped by Athena, Perseus found the Gorgon sisters on Mount Atlas. The Gorgons’ sisters, called the Graeae, were standing guard. The three of them had only one eye and shared it among themselves. Perseus took the eye and threw it away.
                        Following the trail of people turned to stone by Medusa and her sisters, Perseus found the Gorgons. He was wearing his helmet which made him invisible and he was able to sneak up on the sisters. Once they had fallen asleep, Perseus decapitated Medusa using his shield to see her reflection, as he could not look at her directly without turning into stone. The myth goes, when Medusa died the winged horse Pegasus and the warrior Chrysaor, fully armed, sprang fully grown from her body. They were the offspring of the Gorgon and the sea god Poseidon.
                        On the way home, Perseus stopped to rest in Atlas’ kingdom. Atlas refused him hospitality and Perseus used Medusa’s head to turn him into stone, or into the mountain range that bears his name. Later, Perseus came across the princess Andromeda, chained to a rock and left to die by her parents, King Cepheus and Queen Cassiopeia, to appease the sea monster Cetus. Perseus rescued Andromeda and took her home with him.
                        Once home in Seriphos, Perseus found his mother and foster father Dictys hiding from Polydectes in a temple. Perseus went to see the king and, greeted with hostility, he used the Gorgon’s head to turn Polydectes and his followers to stone. He appointed Dictys king of Seriphos.
                        The old prophecy about King Acrisius being killed by his grandson came true eventually, but the king’s death came as an accident. At an athletics contest, Perseus threw a discus that accidentally hit Acrisius and killed him.
                        Andromeda and Perseus were married and had many children, among them Perses, who was said to be an ancestor to the kings of Persia.
                        Perseus and Andromeda lie next to each other in the sky, with her parents Cepheus and Cassiopeia nearby. Cetus, the sea monster, also lies in the vicinity, as does Pegasus, the winged horse.
                        Perseus is usually depicted holding the head of Medusa in one hand and the jewelled sword in the other. The Gorgon’s head is represented by the famous variable star Algol, Beta Persei.
                        https://www.constellation-guide.com/...constellation/

                        Zeus visited Danae in the form of a shower of gold and got her pregnant with Perseus. As a young man Perseus undertook a mission to kill the Medusa. He was furnished with the sword, cap and wings of Mercury and the shield of Minerva. He killed the Medusa by cutting off her head and afterwards killed the sea monster Cetus and then rescued and married Andromeda. Perseus founded a city, having dropped his cap or found a mushroom at Mycenae.
                        Perseus, the Champion, formerly was catalogued as Perseus et Caput Medusae. Perseus is shown in early illustrations as a nude youth wearing the talaria, or winged sandals, with a light scarf thrown around his body, holding in his left hand the Gorgoneion, or head of Medusa-Guberna, the mortal one of the Gorgons, and in his right the, or falx, (scythe) which he had received from Mercury. A title popular at one time, and still seen, was the Rescuer, for, according to the story, Perseus, when under obligations to furnish a Gorgon’s head to Polydectes, found the Sisters asleep at the Ocean; and, using the shield of Minerva (Athena) as a mirror, that he might not be petrified by Medusa’s (Algol) glance, cut off her head, which he then utilized in the rescue of Andromeda.

                        Aratos (ca. 310 BC – 240 BC) characterized the stellar hero as “stirring up a dust in heaven,” either from the fact that his feet are in the celestial road, the Milky Way, or from the haste with which he is going to the rescue of Andromeda… Classical poets called it Pinnipes, referring to the talaria; Cyllenius, the Hero having been aided by Mercury; Abantiades and Acrisioniades, from his grandfather and father; Inachides, from a still earlier ancestor, the first king of Argos; and Deferens caput Algol, Victor Gorgonei monstri, Gorgonifer, Gorgonisue, and Deferens cathenam, from the association of Perseus with Medusa and the chain of Andromeda.
                        Cacodaemon was the astrologers’ name for this constellation, with special reference to Algol as marking the demon’s head. The constellation is 28° in length, — one of the most extended in the heavens, — stretching from the upraised hand of Cassiopeia nearly to the Pleiades, and well justifying the epithet perimeketos, “very tall,” applied to it by Aratos. It offers a field of especial interest to possessors of small telescopes, while even an opera-glass reveals much that is worthy of observation. Argelander gives a list of 81 naked-eye stars, and Heis 136. [3]
                        Here we have set before us a mighty man, called in the Hebrew Peretz, from which we have the Greek form Perses, or Perseus (Rom 16:13). In the Denderah Zodiac His Name is Kar Knem, he who fights and subdues. It is a beautiful constellation of 59 stars, two of which are of the 2nd magnitude, four of the 3rd, twelve of the 4th, etc.
                        Their names supply us with the key to the interpretation of the picture. The star α (in the waist) is called Mirfak, who helps. The next, g (in the right shoulder), is named Al Genib, which means who carries away. The bright star in the left foot is called Athik, who breaks!
                        In his left hand he carries a head, which, by perversion, the Greeks called the head of Medusa, being ignorant that its Hebrew root meant the trodden under foot. It is also called Rosh Satan (Hebrew), the head of the adversary, and Al Oneh (Arabic), the subdued, or Al Ghoul, the evil spirit. The bright star, β (in this head), has come down to us with the name Al Gol, which means rolling round.
                        It is a most remarkable phenomenon that so many of these enemies should be characterised by variable stars! But this head of Medusa, like the neck of Cetus, has one. Al Gol is continually changing. In about 69 hours it changes from the 4th magnitude to the 2nd. During four hours of this period it gradually diminishes in brightness, which it recovers in the succeeding four hours; and in the remaining part of the time invariably preserves its greatest lustre. After the expiration of this time its brightness begins to decrease again. Fit emblem of our great enemy, who, “like a roaring lion, goeth about seeking whom he may devour” (1 Peter 5:8); then changing into a subtle serpent (Gen 3:8); then changing again into “an angel of light” (2 Cor 11:14). “Transforming himself” continually, to devour, deceive, and destroy.
                        https://astrologyking.com/constellation-perseus/
                        "I was hoping for another day. Looks like we just got a whole lot more than that. Let's not waste it."

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                          #13
                          Resources :
                          https://www.solarsystemquick.com/uni...stellation.htm
                          http://www.astronomytrek.com/interes...ation-perseus/
                          https://www.star-registration.com/constellation/perseus
                          https://earthsky.org/constellations/...tober-evenings
                          https://earthsky.org/brightest-stars...brightest-star
                          https://astrologyking.com/constellation-perseus/
                          https://www.lifepersona.com/constell...ars-and-origin
                          https://www.solarsystemquick.com/uni...stellation.htm
                          http://www.barransclass.com/astr1070...s/Perseus.html
                          http://rdanderson.com/stargate/glyphs/glyphs.htm
                          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stargate_(device)
                          http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Glyph
                          Special thanks to @Vilnisr.

                          Glyph 26 – CETUS
                          Name and meaning :
                          Cetus may have originally been associated with a whale, which would have had mythic status amongst Mesopotamian cultures. It is often now called the Whale, though it is most strongly associated with Cetus the sea-monster, who was slain by Perseus as he saved the princess Andromeda from Poseidon's wrath. Cetus is located in a region of the sky called "The Sea" because many water-associated constellations are placed there, including Eridanus, Pisces, Piscis Austrinus, Capricornus, and Aquarius.[7]
                          Cetus has been depicted in many ways throughout its history. In the 17th century, Cetus was depicted as a "dragon fish" by Johann Bayer. Both Willem Blaeu and Andreas Cellarius depicted Cetus as a whale-like creature in the same century. However, Cetus has also been variously depicted with animal heads attached to a piscine body.[7]
                          In global astronomy
                          In Chinese astronomy, the stars of Cetus are found among two areas: the Black Tortoise of the North (北方玄武, Běi Fāng Xuán Wǔ) and the White Tiger of the West (西方白虎, Xī Fāng Bái Hǔ).
                          The Brazilian Tukano and Kobeua people used the stars of Cetus to create a jaguar, representing the god of hurricanes and other violent storms. Lambda, Mu, Xi, Nu, Gamma, and Alpha Ceti represented its head; Omicron, Zeta, and Chi Ceti represented its body; Eta Eri, Tau Cet, and Upsilon Cet marked its legs and feet; and Theta, Eta, and Beta Ceti delineated its tail.[7]
                          In Hawaii, the constellation was called Na Kuhi, and Mira (Omicron Ceti) may have been called Kane.[8]
                          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cetus

                          Cetus represents the sea monster from the Greek myth of the princess Andromeda, whose boastful mother Cassiopeia angered the sea god Poseidon and the Nereids (sea nymphs) by claiming that she was more beautiful than any of them.
                          To appease the sea god and the nymphs, Cassiopeia and her husband, King Cepheus, had to sacrifice their young daughter to Cetus, a sea monster sent by Poseidon to punish the king and queen, or watch the monster ravage their land.
                          Andromeda was chained to a rock and left to the sea monster, but to her good fortune, the hero Perseus was passing by just as Cetus was about to devour her.
                          Perseus rescued the princess and killed Cetus. He and Andromeda were later married.
                          Cetus was commonly depicted by the Greeks as a hybrid creature. It had forefeet, huge jaws, and a scaly body like a giant sea serpent. Even though the constellation is also known as the Whale, the mythical creature in the depictions does not in fact look like a whale.
                          https://www.constellation-guide.com/...constellation/

                          When Cassiopeia, wife of King Cepheus of Ethiopia, boasted that she was more beautiful than the sea nymphs called the Nereids she set in motion one of the most celebrated stories in mythology, the main characters of which are commemorated among the constellations. In retribution for the insult to the Nereids, the sea god Poseidon sent a fearsome monster to ravage the coast of Cepheus’s territory. That monster, a dragon of the sea, is represented by the constellation Cetus.

                          To rid himself of the monster, Cepheus was instructed by the Oracle of Ammon to offer up his daughter Andromeda as a sacrifice to the monster. Andromeda was chained to the cliffs at Joppa (the modern Tel-Aviv) to await her terrible fate.

                          Cetus was visualized by the Greeks as a hybrid creature, with enormous gaping jaws and the forefeet of a land animal, attached to a scaly body with huge coils like a sea serpent. Hence Cetus is drawn on star maps as a most unlikely looking creature, more comical than frightening, nothing like a whale although it is sometimes identified as one.

                          Andromeda trembled as the B-movie monster made towards her, cleaving through the waves like a huge ship. Fortunately, at this moment the hero Perseus happened by and sized up the situation. Swooping down like an eagle onto the creature’s back, Perseus drove his diamond-hard sword deep into its right shoulder. Agonized and enraged, the wounded monster reared up on its coils and twisted around, its cruel jaws snapping at its attacker. Again and again Perseus plunged his sword into the beast – through its ribs, its barnacle-encrusted back and at the root of its tail. Spouting blood, the monster finally collapsed into the sea and lay there like a waterlogged hulk. Its corpse was hauled on shore by the appreciative locals who skinned it and put its bones on display.

                          Amazing Mira and the stars of Cetus
                          Cetus (Κῆτος in Greek) is the fourth-largest constellation, as befits such a monster, but none of its stars is particularly bright. The brightest of them is second-magnitude Beta Ceti, officially named Diphda by the IAU but once also known as Deneb Kaitos from the Arabic meaning sea monster’s tail. Ptolemy in the Almagest described this star as lying on the end of the southern tail fin; the northern fin was marked by the star we now know as Iota Ceti. Alpha Ceti is called Menkar from the Arabic meaning ‘nostrils’, a misnomer since this star lies on the beast’s jaw (in Ptolemy’s description, the star on the nostrils was actually the one to the north we know as Lambda Ceti).

                          The most celebrated star in the constellation is Mira, a Latin name meaning ‘the amazing one’, given on account of its variability in brightness. At times it can easily be seen with the naked eye, but for most of the time it is so faint that it cannot be seen without binoculars or a telescope. Mira is a red giant star whose brightness variations are caused by changes in size. The star was first recorded in 1596 by the Dutch astronomer David Fabricius, but the cyclic nature of the changes was not recognized until 1638. The name Mira was given to the star by the Polish astronomer Johannes Hevelius in 1662, when it was the only variable star known.

                          Chinese associations
                          When the Chinese constellation system was first established some 2,000 years ago this area of sky was rising in the early evening in the autumn, so it became associated with agriculture and harvesting, particularly the storage of cereals. Two granaries can be found in Cetus: Tianjun, a circular one, formed by thirteen stars in what we visualize as the head and neck of the sea monster, including Alpha, Gamma, Delta, and Xi Ceti; and Tiancang, a square one, formed by six stars in the monster’s body (Iota, Eta, Theta, Zeta, Tau, and Upsilon). Despite their names, the shapes formed by the stars of Tianjun and Tiancang are not circular or square. A third granary, Tianlin, was just over the border in present-day Taurus.

                          South of Tianjun was Chuhao or Chugao, a group of six stars near the border with Eridanus that included Epsilon and Rho Ceti; this constellation represented a supply of animal feed or, in another interpretation, medicinal herbs. A loop of seven stars near Eta Ceti formed Tianhun, a manure pit or pigsty on a farm, although the stars’ identities are uncertain. The single star Beta Ceti was Tusikong, a controller of land and minister of works.

                          Some maps show Bakui, a net for catching birds, in the region of 2, 6, and 7 Ceti. However, older maps place this constellation farther south, in Sculptor and Phoenix, which suggests that Chinese astronomers moved it northwards over time as precession took this part of the sky below their horizon.

                          http://www.ianridpath.com/startales/cetus.htm

                          Resources :
                          http://rdanderson.com/stargate/glyphs/glyphs.htm
                          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stargate_(device)
                          http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Glyph
                          http://alessandrozotta.it/cetus/
                          https://in-the-sky.org/data/constellation.php?id=22
                          https://www.universeguide.com/constellation/cetus
                          https://www.star-registration.com/constellation/cetus
                          https://www.globeatnight.org/mythology/cetus
                          http://www.constellationsofwords.com...ons/Cetus.html

                          Special thanks to @Vilnisr.
                          "I was hoping for another day. Looks like we just got a whole lot more than that. Let's not waste it."

                          "Never underestimate your audience. They're generally sensitive, intelligent people who respond positively to quality entertainment."

                          "Individual science fiction stories may seem as trivial as ever to the blinder critics and philosophers of today, but the core of science fiction, its essence, has become crucial to our salvation, if we are to be saved at all."

                          Comment


                            #14
                            Glyph 27 - TAURUS
                            Name and meaning :
                            The identification of the constellation of Taurus with a bull is very old, certainly dating to the Chalcolithic, and perhaps even to the Upper Paleolithic. Michael Rappenglück of the University of Munich believes that Taurus is represented in a cave painting at the Hall of the Bulls in the caves at Lascaux (dated to roughly 15,000 BC), which he believes is accompanied by a depiction of the Pleiades.[38][39] The name "seven sisters" has been used for the Pleiades in the languages of many cultures, including indigenous groups of Australia, North America and Siberia. This suggests that the name may have a common ancient origin.[40]
                            Taurus marked the point of vernal (spring) equinox in the Chalcolithic and the Early Bronze Age, from about 4000 BC to 1700 BC, after which it moved into the neighboring constellation Aries.[41] The Pleiades were closest to the Sun at vernal equinox around the 23rd century BC. In Babylonian astronomy, the constellation was listed in the MUL.APIN as GU4.AN.NA, "The Bull of Heaven".[42] As this constellation marked the vernal equinox, it was also the first constellation in the Babylonian zodiac and they described it as "The Bull in Front".[43] The Akkadian name was Alu.[44]
                            In the Old Babylonian Epic of Gilgamesh, the goddess Ishtar sends Taurus, the Bull of Heaven, to kill Gilgamesh for spurning her advances.[45] Enkidu tears off the bull's hind part and hurls the quarters into the sky where they become the stars we know as Ursa Major and Ursa Minor. Some locate Gilgamesh as the neighboring constellation of Orion, facing Taurus as if in combat,[46] while others identify him with the sun whose rising on the equinox vanquishes the constellation. In early Mesopotamian art, the Bull of Heaven was closely associated with Inanna, the Sumerian goddess of sexual love, fertility, and warfare. One of the oldest depictions shows the bull standing before the goddess' standard; since it has 3 stars depicted on its back (the cuneiform sign for "star-constellation"), there is good reason to regard this as the constellation later known as Taurus.[44]
                            The same iconic representation of the Heavenly Bull was depicted in the Dendera zodiac, an Egyptian bas-relief carving in a ceiling that depicted the celestial hemisphere using a planisphere. In these ancient cultures, the orientation of the horns was portrayed as upward or backward. This differed from the later Greek depiction where the horns pointed forward.[47] To the Egyptians, the constellation Taurus was a sacred bull that was associated with the renewal of life in spring. When the spring equinox entered Taurus, the constellation would become covered by the Sun in the western sky as spring began. This "sacrifice" led to the renewal of the land.[48] To the early Hebrews, Taurus was the first constellation in their zodiac and consequently it was represented by the first letter in their alphabet, Aleph.[49]
                            In Greek mythology, Taurus was identified with Zeus, who assumed the form of a magnificent white bull to abduct Europa, a legendary Phoenician princess. In illustrations of Greek mythology, only the front portion of this constellation is depicted; this was sometimes explained as Taurus being partly submerged as he carried Europa out to sea. A second Greek myth portrays Taurus as Io, a mistress of Zeus. To hide his lover from his wife Hera, Zeus changed Io into the form of a heifer.[50] Greek mythographer Acusilaus marks the bull Taurus as the same that formed the myth of the Cretan Bull, one of The Twelve Labors of Heracles.[51]
                            Taurus became an important object of worship among the Druids. Their Tauric religious festival was held while the Sun passed through the constellation.[41] Among the arctic people known as the Inuit, the constellation is called Sakiattiat and the Hyades is Nanurjuk, with the latter representing the spirit of the polar bear. Aldebaran represents the bear, with the remainder of the stars in the Hyades being dogs that are holding the beast at bay.[52]
                            In Buddhism, legends hold that Gautama Buddha was born when the Full Moon was in Vaisakha, or Taurus.[53] Buddha's birthday is celebrated with the Wesak Festival, or Vesākha, which occurs on the first or second Full Moon when the Sun is in Taurus.[54]
                            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Taurus_(constellation)

                            Atlas, the Titan who held up the Earth on his giant shoulders, and his wife Pleione had 7 daughters collectively known as the Pleiades, namely Maia, Electra, Alcyone, Taygete, Asterope, Celaeno and Merope. After becoming the target of Orion’s affections, and being chased across the world, Zeus subsequently transformed them into a flock of doves (“Pleiades” in Greek”), and set them in the heavens as the seven sisters. One of the sisters, Merope, however, is invisible out of shame for having married Sysiphus, a mortal man.
                            Atlas had a further 7 daughters by Aethra. The Hyades, as they were know, wept so bitterly after the death of their brother, Hyas, that Zeus took compassion on them and set them as a cluster of stars at the head of the constellation Taurus.
                            http://www.astronomytrek.com/taurus-the-bull/

                            Taurus constellation has been known since at least the Early Bronze Age, when it marked the Sun’s location during the spring equinox. It has been associated with the bull in many cultures and mythologies: Greek and Egyptian among other, and even going back to Ancient Babylon.
                            Depictions of Taurus and the Pleiades star cluster have even been found in a cave painting at Lascaux, dating back to 15,000 BC. Both the constellation and the Pleiades have been known in many indigenous cultures and referred to as the bull and the seven sisters, which indicates a common origin for the names.

                            In Greek mythology, Taurus is usually associated with Zeus, who adopted the shape of a bull in order to seduce and abduct Europa, the beautiful daughter of the Phoenician King Agenor.
                            Zeus mingled with the king’s herd and, being the most handsome bull there, he got Europa’s attention. The princess admired the bull and, when she sat on his back, he rose and headed for the sea. Zeus carried Europa all the way to the island of Crete, where he revealed his true identity and lavished the princess with presents.
                            The two had three sons together, including Minos, who grew up to be the famous king of Crete, who built the palace at Knossos where bull games were held and who also sacrificed seven young boys and girls to the Minotaur each year. Zeus later commemorated the bull by placing it among the stars.
                            An alternative interpretation associates Taurus with the nymph Io, whose line Europa was descended from, who was also seduced by Zeus and then transformed into a heifer when the two were nearly caught by Hera.
                            Babylonian astronomers called the constellation MUL.APIN, or “The Heavenly Bull.” In the Epic of Gilgamesh, one of the earliest literary works from Mesopotamia, Gilgamesh faces the Bull of Heaven sent by the goddess Ishtar to kill the hero after he had rejected her advances.
                            Gilgamesh is sometimes associated with the nearby Orion, another ancient constellation, and the two constellations are depicted as Gilgamesh and the bull in combat.

                            https://www.constellation-guide.com/...constellation/




                            Resources :
                            http://rdanderson.com/stargate/glyphs/glyphs.htm
                            https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stargate_(device)
                            http://stargate.wikia.com/wiki/Glyph
                            http://blog.underluckystars.com/the-...constellation/
                            https://www.universeguide.com/constellation/taurus
                            https://telescopeobserver.com/taurus-constellation/
                            https://www.globeatnight.org/mythology/taurus
                            http://www.crystalinks.com/taurus.html
                            https://www.slooh.com/community/post/4500
                            https://www.theguardian.com/science/...tion-supernova
                            http://www.dibonsmith.com/tau_con.htm
                            Special thanks to @Vilnisr.
                            "I was hoping for another day. Looks like we just got a whole lot more than that. Let's not waste it."

                            "Never underestimate your audience. They're generally sensitive, intelligent people who respond positively to quality entertainment."

                            "Individual science fiction stories may seem as trivial as ever to the blinder critics and philosophers of today, but the core of science fiction, its essence, has become crucial to our salvation, if we are to be saved at all."

                            Comment


                              #15
                              Glyph 28 – AURIGA
                              Name and meaning :
                              The first record of Auriga's stars was in Mesopotamia as a constellation called GAM, representing a scimitar or crook. However, this may have represented just Capella (Alpha Aurigae) or the modern constellation as a whole; this figure was alternatively called Gamlum or MUL.GAM in the MUL.APIN. The crook of Auriga stood for a goat-herd or shepherd. It was formed from most of the stars of the modern constellation; all of the bright stars were included except for Elnath, traditionally assigned to both Taurus and Auriga. Later, Bedouin astronomers created constellations that were groups of animals, where each star represented one animal. The stars of Auriga comprised a herd of goats, an association also present in Greek mythology.[7] The association with goats carried into the Greek astronomical tradition, though it later became associated with a charioteer along with the shepherd.[8]
                              In Greek mythology, Auriga is often identified as the mythological Greek hero Erichthonius of Athens, the chthonic son of Hephaestus who was raised by the goddess Athena. Erichthonius was generally credited to be the inventor of the quadriga, the four-horse chariot, which he used in the battle against the usurper Amphictyon, the event that made Erichthonius the king of Athens.[9][10] His chariot was created in the image of the Sun's chariot, the reason Zeus placed him in the heavens.[11] The Athenian hero then dedicated himself to Athena and, soon after, Zeus raised him into the night sky in honor of his ingenuity and heroic deeds.[12]

                              A painting by Peter Paul Rubens entitled Finding of Erichthonius; Erichthonius and Auriga are often associated.
                              Auriga, however, is sometimes described as Myrtilus, who was Hermes's son and the charioteer of Oenomaus.[10] The association of Auriga and Myrtilus is supported by depictions of the constellation, which rarely show a chariot. Myrtilus's chariot was destroyed in a race intended for suitors to win the heart of Oenomaus's daughter Hippodamia. Myrtilus earned his position in the sky when Hippodamia's successful suitor, Pelops, killed him, despite his complicity in helping Pelops win her hand. After his death, Myrtilus's father Hermes placed him in the sky. Yet another mythological association of Auriga is Theseus's son Hippolytus. He was ejected from Athens after he refused the romantic advances of his stepmother Phaedra, who committed suicide as a result. He was killed when his chariot was wrecked, but revived by Asclepius.[11][13] Regardless of Auriga's specific representation, it is likely that the constellation was created by the ancient Greeks to commemorate the importance of the chariot in their society.[14]
                              An incidental appearance of Auriga in Greek mythology is as the limbs of Medea's brother. In the myth of Jason and the Argonauts, as they journeyed home, Medea killed her brother and dismembered him, flinging the parts of his body into the sea, represented by the Milky Way. Each individual star represents a different limb.[15]
                              Capella is associated with the mythological she-goat Amalthea, who breast-fed the infant Zeus. It forms an asterism with the stars Epsilon Aurigae, Zeta Aurigae, and Eta Aurigae, the latter two of which are known as the Haedi (the Kids).[16] Though most often associated with Amalthea, Capella has sometimes been associated with Amalthea's owner, a nymph. The myth of the nymph says that the goat's hideous appearance, resembling a Gorgon, was partially responsible for the Titans' defeat, because Zeus skinned the goat and wore it as his aegis.[11] The asterism containing the three goats had been a separate constellation; however, Ptolemy merged the Charioteer and the Goats in the 2nd-century Almagest.[14] Before that, Capella was sometimes seen as its own constellation—by Pliny the Elder and Manilius—called Capra, Caper, or Hircus, all of which relate to its status as the "goat star".[17] Zeta Aurigae and Eta Aurigae were first called the "Kids" by Cleostratus, an ancient Greek astronomer.[11]
                              Traditionally, illustrations of Auriga represent it as a chariot and its driver. The charioteer holds a goat over his left shoulder and has two kids under his left arm; he holds the reins to the chariot in his right hand.[2] However, depictions of Auriga have been inconsistent over the years. The reins in his right hand have also been drawn as a whip, though Capella is almost always over his left shoulder and the Kids under his left arm. The 1488 atlas Hyginus deviated from this typical depiction by showing a four-wheeled cart driven by Auriga, who holds the reins of two oxen, a horse, and a zebra. Jacob Micyllus depicted Auriga in his Hyginus of 1535 as a charioteer with a two-wheeled cart, powered by two horses and two oxen. Arabic and Turkish depictions of Auriga varied wildly from those of the European Renaissance; one Turkish atlas depicted the stars of Auriga as a mule, called Mulus clitellatus by Johann Bayer.[17] One unusual representation of Auriga, from 17th-century France, showed Auriga as Adam kneeling on the Milky Way, with a goat wrapped around his shoulders.[18]
                              Occasionally, Auriga is seen not as the Charioteer but as Bellerophon, the mortal rider of Pegasus who dared to approach Mount Olympus. In this version of the tale, Jupiter pitied Bellerophon for his foolishness and placed him in the stars.[19]
                              Some of the stars of Auriga were incorporated into a now-defunct constellation called Telescopium Herschelii. This constellation was introduced by Maximilian Hell to honor William Herschel's discovery of Uranus. Originally, it included two constellations, Tubus Hershelii Major [sic], in Gemini, Lynx, and Auriga, and Tubus Hershelii Minor [sic] in Orion and Taurus; both represented Herschel's telescopes. Johann Bode combined Hell's constellations into Telescopium Herschelii in 1801, located mostly in Auriga.[20]
                              Since the time of Ptolemy, Auriga has remained a constellation and is officially recognized by the International Astronomical Union, although like all modern constellations, it is now defined as a specific region of the sky that includes both the ancient pattern and the surrounding stars.[21][22] In 1922, the IAU designated its recommended three-letter abbreviation, "Aur".[23] The official boundaries of Auriga were created in 1930 by Eugène Delporte as a polygon of 21 segments. Its right ascension is between 4h 37.5m and 7h 30.5m and its declination is between 27.9° and 56.2° in the equatorial coordinate system.[3]
                              The stars of Auriga were incorporated into several Chinese constellations. Wuche, the five chariots of the celestial emperors and the representation of the grain harvest, was a constellation formed by Alpha Aurigae, Beta Aurigae, Beta Tauri, Theta Aurigae, and Iota Aurigae. Sanzhu or Zhu was one of three constellations which represented poles for horses to be tethered. They were formed by the triplets of Epsilon, Zeta, and Eta Aurigae; Nu, Tau, and Upsilon Aurigae; and Chi and 26 Aurigae, with one other undetermined star. Xianchi, the pond where the sun set and Tianhuang, a pond, bridge, or pier, were other constellations in Auriga, though the stars that composed them are undetermined. Zuoqi, representing chairs for the emperor and other officials, was made up of nine stars in the east of the constellation. Bagu, a constellation mostly formed from stars in Camelopardalis representing different types of crops, included the northern stars of Delta and Xi Aurigae.[11]
                              In ancient Hindu astronomy, Capella represented the heart of Brahma and was important religiously. Ancient Peruvian peoples saw Capella, called Colca, as a star intimately connected to the affairs of shepherds.[18]
                              In Brazil, the Bororo people incorporate the stars of Auriga into a massive constellation representing a caiman; its southern stars represent the end of the animal's tail. The eastern portion of Taurus is the rest of the tail, while Orion is its body and Lepus is the head. This constellation arose because of the prominence of caymans in daily Amazonian life.[24] There is evidence that Capella was significant to the Aztec people, as the Late Classic site Monte Albán has a marker for the star's heliacal rising.[25] Indigenous peoples of California and Nevada also noticed the bright pattern of Auriga's stars. To them, the constellation's bright stars formed a curve that was represented in crescent-shaped petroglyphs.[26] The indigenous Pawnee of North America recognized a constellation with the same major stars as modern Auriga: Alpha, Beta, Gamma (Beta Tauri), Theta, and Iota Aurigae.[27]
                              The people of the Marshall Islands featured Auriga in the myth of Dümur, which tells the story of the creation of the sky. Antares in Scorpius represents Dümur, the oldest son of the stars' mother, and the Pleiades represent her youngest son. The mother of the stars, Ligedaner,[28][29] is represented by Capella; she lived on the island of Alinablab. She told her sons that the first to reach an eastern island would become the King of the Stars, and asked Dümur to let her come in his canoe. He refused, as did each of her sons in turn, except for Pleiades. Pleiades won the race with the help of Ligedaner, and became the King of the Stars.[28] Elsewhere in the central Caroline Islands, Capella was called Jefegen uun (variations include efang alul, evang-el-ul, and iefangel uul), meaning "north of Aldebaran".[30] Different names were noted for Auriga and Capella in Eastern Pacific societies. On Pukapuka, the figure of modern Auriga was called Te Wale-o-Tutakaiolo ("The house of Tutakaiolo");[31] in the Society Islands, it was called Faa-nui ("Great Valley").[32] Capella itself was called Tahi-anii ("Unique Sovereign") in the Societies.[33] Hoku-lei was the name for Capella but may have been the name for the whole constellation; the name means "Star-wreath" and refers to one of the wives of the Pleiades, called Makalii.[34]
                              The stars of Auriga feature in Inuit constellations. Quturjuuk, meaning "collar-bones",[35] was a constellation that included Capella (Alpha Aurigae), Menkalinan (Beta Aurigae), Pollux (Beta Geminorum), and Castor (Alpha Geminorum). Its rising signalled that the constellation Aagjuuk, made up of Altair (Alpha Aquilae), Tarazed (Gamma Aquilae), and sometimes Alshain (Beta Aquilae), would rise soon. Aagjuuk, which represented the dawn following the winter solstice, was an incredibly important constellation in the Inuit mythos.[36] It was also used for navigation and time-keeping at night.[37]

                              https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Auriga_(constellation)
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