PDA

View Full Version : Brody is the man!



LordRush
May 3rd, 2011, 11:52 AM
He makes awesome stuff for the ship and its crew, it seems hes been keeping busy:

1)vodka still :D
2)paper project
3)bullets :eek:
4)broke off and formed "FUTURA"

Artemis-Neith
May 3rd, 2011, 12:00 PM
Well, he's an engineer, as far as I know, there're no limits for engineers. ;)

And, aside from that, I like love him (and Volker, nice couple — not exactly that way, but... if you want... up to you! — Btw, those two, doing a lot of jokes :))

carmencatalina
May 3rd, 2011, 12:13 PM
I have to feel a bit for Brody right now, it can't be easy for him learning that his alternate self ended up alienated from the others.

jelgate
May 3rd, 2011, 01:41 PM
I'm more then curious what materials Broody is using to make bullets

Pond Hopper
May 3rd, 2011, 01:53 PM
I'm more then curious what materials Broody is using to make bullets

Perhaps the casings are recycled, if that's even possible, the bullets themselves are formed from melting lead that they found off world and as for the gunpowder and primer.. that's anyone's guess

Shadow_7
May 3rd, 2011, 01:55 PM
You can recycle the shell casings. So all you need is a projectile replacement and an explosive. They are pretty primitive really. A tube, an explosive, and a projectile. In use by planet earth for well over 2,000 years now. Gun powder is low yield stuff by modern standards. As I wonder if some form of bamboo that absorbs the vodka and shaved down to a powder would be enough yield. Or repurposing a few LA plosives. For that matter, where did he get the parts for the still?

Pharaoh Atem
May 3rd, 2011, 02:21 PM
He makes awesome stuff for the ship and its crew, it seems hes been keeping busy:

1)vodka still :D
2)paper project
3)bullets :eek:
4)broke off and formed "FUTURA"

When was paper and bullets brought up?

Shylodog
May 3rd, 2011, 02:30 PM
When was paper and bullets brought up?

Paper was brought up when Eli gave Rush the calculations he was asking for at the beginning of the show. Bullets were brought up when Greer was letting Young know that they were really low on ammo while getting ready to head to the planet.

Pond Hopper
May 3rd, 2011, 02:32 PM
When was paper and bullets brought up?

When Rush goes to see Eli near the start of the episode he asks Eli for some equations, Eli hands him a sheet of paper and Rush says something about Brody's paper making project. And when they're in the armory preparing to go the planet Greer mentions that they're nearly out of bullets, at that point Colonel Young says Brody can make more.

General Jumper One
May 3rd, 2011, 02:46 PM
When was paper and bullets brought up?

"Blockade" - that's why this thread is in the "Blockade" folder ;)

morrismike
May 3rd, 2011, 02:55 PM
I'm more then curious what materials Broody is using to make bullets
Lead or brass. He's not actually making ammo, BTW. There is no way a black powder round generates enough pressure to work a slide. They lack the capability to make nitrocellulose (requires paper, concentrated nitric and sulferic acids).

Assuming they had the capability to make the proper powder, reloading ammo requires the use of dies and presses. They lack the capability to make either.

I believe the bullet comment was sarcasm.

morrismike
May 3rd, 2011, 02:56 PM
When was paper and bullets brought up?
Rush made the paper comment when he noticed elis scratchpaper was full.

Rush made a sarcastic comment amount bullets.

traylormatt
May 3rd, 2011, 03:02 PM
Been one of my favourite characters since the very begining. He makes so much. If they had any kind of money on Novus, he would have been a rich man with all of his builds. Especially as he would have owned the first pub surely.

Pond Hopper
May 3rd, 2011, 03:14 PM
(requires paper, concentrated nitric and sulferic acids).

Well they have paper, we know that much :p

morrismike
May 3rd, 2011, 04:07 PM
Well they have paper, we know that much :p

They'd need a lot of paper. It would need to be cardstock or something like thin solid cardboard.

garhkal
May 3rd, 2011, 06:45 PM
Perhaps the casings are recycled, if that's even possible, the bullets themselves are formed from melting lead that they found off world and as for the gunpowder and primer.. that's anyone's guess

You can reuse shell casings.. They are called "recasted" rounds, but are somewhat unreliable.

As for paper.. you would think that at least volkar and brody would have grabbed a few note pads... seeing as the crew is low.

morrismike
May 4th, 2011, 03:11 AM
You can reuse shell casings.. They are called "recasted" rounds, but are somewhat unreliable.

As for paper.. you would think that at least volkar and brody would have grabbed a few note pads... seeing as the crew is low.
The still need primers (a simple version would require fulminated mercury) and a press to make them. They still never dies and presses to make ammo. Lead cast bullet loads aren't going to work the slides on those rifles. In reality that brass is a valuable resource (for things other than reloading) and yet they've never policed their rounds. It must be nice having infinite clips and ammo.

meo3000
May 4th, 2011, 03:59 AM
Im sure theres enough scrapped metal from damaged parts of Destiny. Naquadah bullets anyone?

Ser Scot A Ellison
May 4th, 2011, 04:31 AM
Shadow,


You can recycle the shell casings. So all you need is a projectile replacement and an explosive. They are pretty primitive really. A tube, an explosive, and a projectile. In use by planet earth for well over 2,000 years now. Gun powder is low yield stuff by modern standards. As I wonder if some form of bamboo that absorbs the vodka and shaved down to a powder would be enough yield. Or repurposing a few LA plosives. For that matter, where did he get the parts for the still?

What are you using as a precussion cap? Gunpowder does nothing without something to ignite it.

Steelbox
May 4th, 2011, 04:41 AM
You can recycle the shell casings. So all you need is a projectile replacement and an explosive. They are pretty primitive really. A tube, an explosive, and a projectile. In use by planet earth for well over 2,000 years now. Gun powder is low yield stuff by modern standards. As I wonder if some form of bamboo that absorbs the vodka and shaved down to a powder would be enough yield. Or repurposing a few LA plosives. For that matter, where did he get the parts for the still?

But modern guns shell are in use for just around 150 years. The first cannon in use appeared around 1260. First guns i didn't find but it wasn't much earlier.


Integrated paper cartridges

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/30/Chassepot_paper_cartridge.jpg/220px-Chassepot_paper_cartridge.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Chassepot_paper_cartridge.jpg) http://bits.wikimedia.org/skins-1.17/common/images/magnify-clip.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Chassepot_paper_cartridge.jpg)
Chassepot (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chassepot) paper cartridge (1866).


The first integrated cartridge, was developed in Paris in 1808 by the Swiss gunsmith Jean Samuel Pauly (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Samuel_Pauly) in association with French gunsmith François Prélat (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fran%C3%A7ois_Pr%C3%A9lat). Pauly created the first fully self-contained cartridges:[4] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cartridge_%28firearms%29#cite_note-Smyth-3) the cartridges incorporated a copper base with integrated mercury fulminate (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mercury_fulminate) primer powder (the major innovation of Pauly), a paper casing and a round bullet.[5] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cartridge_%28firearms%29#cite_note-Pauly-4) The cartridge was loaded through the breech and fired with a needle. The needle-activated central-fire breech-loading (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Breech-loading) gun would become a major feature of firearms thereafter.[6] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cartridge_%28firearms%29#cite_note-5) Pauly made an improved version, protected by a patent, on 29 September 1812.[4] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cartridge_%28firearms%29#cite_note-Smyth-3)
Probably no invention connected with firearms has wrought such changes in the principle of gun construction as those effected by the "expansive cartridge case". This invention has completely revolutionized the art of gunmaking, has been successfully applied to all descriptions of firearms, and has produced a new and important industry: that of cartridge manufacture. Its essential feature is preventing gas escaping the breech when the weapon is fired, by means of an expansive cartridge case containing its own means of ignition. Previous to this invention shotguns and sporting rifles were loaded by means of powder flasks and shot flasks, bullets, wads and copper caps, all carried separately. One of the earliest efficient modern cartridge cases was the pin-fire cartridge, developed by French gunsmith Casimir Lefaucheux (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Casimir_Lefaucheux) in 1836.[7] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cartridge_%28firearms%29#cite_note-Pistols-6) It consisted of a thin weak shell made of brass and paper that expanded from the force of the explosion. This fit perfectly in the barrel, and thus formed an efficient gas check. A small percussion cap was placed in the middle of the base of the cartridge, and was exploded by means of a brass pin projecting from the side and struck by the hammer. This pin also afforded the means of extracting the cartridge case. This cartridge was introduced in England by Lang, of Cockspur Street, London, about 1845. Later in 1846, M.Houiller, another Paris gunsmith, improved on the system by introducing a fully metallic cartridge in 1847.[7] (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cartridge_%28firearms%29#cite_note-Pistols-6)
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/8/83/Needle_gun_cartridge.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Needle_gun_cartridge.jpg) http://bits.wikimedia.org/skins-1.17/common/images/magnify-clip.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Needle_gun_cartridge.jpg)
A diagram of a Dreyse (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dreyse) needle gun cartridge, showing the paper cartridge case, the sabot, and acorn-shaped bullet.


As a In the American Civil War (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Civil_War) (1861–65) a breechloading rifle, the Sharps, was introduced and produced in large numbers. It could be loaded with either a ball or a paper cartridge (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Paper_cartridge). After that war many were converted to the use of metal cartridges. The development by Smith & Wesson (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smith_%26_Wesson) (amongst many others) of revolver handguns that used metal cartridges helped to establish cartridge firearms as the standard in the USA by the 1870s although many continued to use percussion revolvers well after that.


Full metal cartridges

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/9/99/Snider-Martini-Enfield_Cartridges.JPG/220px-Snider-Martini-Enfield_Cartridges.JPG (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Snider-Martini-Enfield_Cartridges.JPG) http://bits.wikimedia.org/skins-1.17/common/images/magnify-clip.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Snider-Martini-Enfield_Cartridges.JPG)
(From Left to Right): A .577 Snider (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.577_Snider) cartridge (1867), a .577/450 Martini-Henry (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.577/450_Martini-Henry) cartridge (1871), a later drawn brass .577/450 Martini-Henry (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Martini-Henry) cartridge, and a .303 British Mk VII SAA Ball cartridge.


http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/84/Fusil_Gras_M80_1874_metallic_cartridge.jpg/220px-Fusil_Gras_M80_1874_metallic_cartridge.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Fusil_Gras_M80_1874_metallic_cartridge.jpg) http://bits.wikimedia.org/skins-1.17/common/images/magnify-clip.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Fusil_Gras_M80_1874_metallic_cartridge.jpg)
French Army Fusil Gras mle 1874 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fusil_Gras_mle_1874) metallic cartridge.


The first commercially successful all-metal cartridges were rimfire (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rimfire) cartridges. The first of these was the .22 BB (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.22_BB) Cap, introduced around 1845. This was followed by the .22 Short in 1857. Larger caliber rimfires were soon introduced. Some of these were used in the American Civil War (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/American_Civil_War), including the .44 Henry (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/.44_Henry) and 56-56 Spencer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/56-56_Spencer). However, the large rimfires were soon replaced by centerfire (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Centerfire) cartridges, which could safely handle higher pressures.
In 1867 the British war office adopted the Eley-Boxer (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Eley_Brothers) metallic central-fire cartridge case in the Enfield rifles (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pattern_1853_Enfield), which were converted to Snider-Enfield breech-loaders (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Snider-Enfield) on the Snider principle. This consisted of a block opening on a hinge, thus forming a false breech (http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=False_breech&action=edit&redlink=1) against which the cartridge rested. The priming cap was in the base of the cartridge, and was discharged by a striker (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Firing_pin#Firing_pin_vs._striker) passing through the breech block. Other European powers adopted breech-loading military rifles from 1866 to 1868, with paper instead of metallic cartridge cases. The original Eley-Boxer cartridge case was made of thin coiled brass - occasionally these cartridges could break apart and jam the breech with the unwound remains of the casing upon firing. Later the solid-drawn, central-fire cartridge case, made of one entire solid piece of tough hard metal, an alloy of copper, with a solid head of thicker metal, has been generally substituted.
http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/34/Lebel_8mm_round.jpg/220px-Lebel_8mm_round.jpg (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Lebel_8mm_round.jpg) http://bits.wikimedia.org/skins-1.17/common/images/magnify-clip.png (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Lebel_8mm_round.jpg)
The 8 mm Lebel (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/8_mm_Lebel) ammunition, developed in 1886, the first smokeless gunpowder (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Smokeless_powder) cartridge to be made and adopted by any country.


Central-fire cartridges with solid-drawn metallic cases containing their own means of ignition are almost universally used in all modern varieties of military and sporting rifles and pistols.
Around 1870, machined tolerances had improved to the point that the cartridge case was no longer necessary to seal a firing chamber. Precision-faced bolts would seal as well, and could be economically manufactured.




You can reuse shell casings.. They are called "recasted" rounds, but are somewhat unreliable.

As for paper.. you would think that at least Volker and Brody would have grabbed a few note pads... seeing as the crew is low.

Any one saw them collecting used shells? Every time they have to use their weapon is in a dangerous situation with no way to come back. When the ammo is used up their done for good.

Shadow_7
May 4th, 2011, 07:58 AM
Well the chinese had fireworks (i.e. gun powder) over 2,000 years ago. Not that guns were common items back then. But I'm sure someone had made some sort of canon with said fireworks. If the kids of today are any indication. Just because they blew to smitherines and/or we never found archeological evidence (yet) doesn't mean they didn't exist.

The repair robots can make windows and frames, I'm sure they can make casings and other things. It's not rocket science. They just need close tollerances to be of use in those weapons. They have plenty of metal scrap around in unused compartments. And who knows, maybe the novans left them a bullet press to the needed specification. Bullets don't have to be lead. Casings don't have to be brass. And the propellant doesn't have to be gun powder or even powder for that matter. It just needs the ignition and expansion properties similar to gun powder to not overpower the existing guns. For all we know the LA supplies could include enough gun powder and a bullet press too. With plenty of mines that are more of a defensive weapon, I'm sure they have the needed materials on Destiny. And up until recently almost all of the actually fired in this timeline rounds were fired on Destiny. To be policed at their leisure.

I'm sure that making the still required many of the same techniques needed to make bullets. A bullet is a plug at the end of a tube, from a techical perspective. And an explosive, which they have lots of on board. C4, LA mines, ....... Although I think that Youngs comment was made in jest. For now anyway.

garhkal
May 4th, 2011, 03:00 PM
Being we saw them try to get ammo, and failed, i doubt they got a smithy press.

morrismike
May 4th, 2011, 03:41 PM
Well the chinese had fireworks (i.e. gun powder) over 2,000 years ago. Not that guns were common items back then. But I'm sure someone had made some sort of canon with said fireworks. If the kids of today are any indication. Just because they blew to smitherines and/or we never found archeological evidence (yet) doesn't mean they didn't exist.

The repair robots can make windows and frames, I'm sure they can make casings and other things. It's not rocket science. They just need close tollerances to be of use in those weapons. They have plenty of metal scrap around in unused compartments. And who knows, maybe the novans left them a bullet press to the needed specification. Bullets don't have to be lead. Casings don't have to be brass. And the propellant doesn't have to be gun powder or even powder for that matter. It just needs the ignition and expansion properties similar to gun powder to not overpower the existing guns. For all we know the LA supplies could include enough gun powder and a bullet press too. With plenty of mines that are more of a defensive weapon, I'm sure they have the needed materials on Destiny. And up until recently almost all of the actually fired in this timeline rounds were fired on Destiny. To be policed at their leisure.

I'm sure that making the still required many of the same techniques needed to make bullets. A bullet is a plug at the end of a tube, from a techical perspective. And an explosive, which they have lots of on board. C4, LA mines, ....... Although I think that Youngs comment was made in jest. For now anyway.

A press and dies are required to manufacture bullets and to assemble cartridges. They lack the means to make either. It is a very exact thing reloading ammo that will function a semiauto weapon. If they were shooting revolvers then it becomes much easier to accomplish.

Shylodog
May 4th, 2011, 06:55 PM
A press and dies are required to manufacture bullets and to assemble cartridges. They lack the means to make either. It is a very exact thing reloading ammo that will function a semiauto weapon. If they were shooting revolvers then it becomes much easier to accomplish.

However, since most folks who aren't gun enthusiasts wouldn't know that, we are probably expected to suspend disbelief in this matter.

Ser Scot A Ellison
May 5th, 2011, 04:33 AM
Shylo,


However, since most folks who aren't gun enthusiasts wouldn't know that, we are probably expected to suspend disbelief in this matter.

That's quite a request. I'd rather find out they have magic magazines that automatically pull materials from the air to make more bullets.

KEK
May 5th, 2011, 04:38 AM
We don't know what engineering devices Destiny has on board yet. There might even be some sort of precursor to Merlin's device in The Quest.

garhkal
May 5th, 2011, 02:14 PM
Doubt it as we don't even know when that device came into being.. Was it before or after atlantis was made?

General Jumper One
May 5th, 2011, 02:27 PM
Doubt it as we don't even know when that device came into being.. Was it before or after atlantis was made?

It was in season 9(not sure) that we saw Merlin's device, after Merlin and the others came back from Atlantis.

Pharaoh Atem
May 5th, 2011, 08:09 PM
destiny just stops are a home depot

morrismike
May 6th, 2011, 03:14 AM
I was a little disapointed they didn't top of the armory with novan weapons.

morrismike
May 6th, 2011, 03:17 AM
destiny just stops are a home depot

The needed equipment isn't at home depot. You'd need to find a gun shop and hope they have a large quantity of the exact powder you'd need. Bullets, primers and cases would be readily available at any gun shop. There are hundreds of powders and only a few are suitable. If they get really lucky on Novas they find new weapons and semitruck loads of ammo. I'm thinking the novans had energy weapons if they made it into space on their own steam.

garhkal
May 6th, 2011, 01:32 PM
I am surprised we have not found even primative energy weapons..

garhkal
May 6th, 2011, 01:32 PM
It was in season 9(not sure) that we saw Merlin's device, after Merlin and the others came back from Atlantis.

So to me that means it was more than likely made after.

Shylodog
May 6th, 2011, 01:45 PM
I also noticed that Brody hasn't actually MADE paper yet. Rush's comment to Eli was, "Here's hoping something comes of Mr. Brody's paper-making project."

So, he hasn't made paper yet. It's then likely that Young's comment to Greer about ammunition is completely tongue-in-cheek.

morrismike
May 7th, 2011, 03:23 AM
I also noticed that Brody hasn't actually MADE paper yet. Rush's comment to Eli was, "Here's hoping something comes of Mr. Brody's paper-making project."

So, he hasn't made paper yet. It's then likely that Young's comment to Greer about ammunition is completely tongue-in-cheek.
Probably correct.

garhkal
May 7th, 2011, 02:09 PM
So why didn't they see if there were any supply stores like office max? Get lots of paper!

Shadow_7
May 7th, 2011, 05:47 PM
iirc, BITD, paper was generally the bark of a tree, or an animal skin. As long as they still have pens, I don't really see lack of paper as an issue. As long as they have pens, then they can write it on their skin and wash it off (or tattoo it).

morrismike
May 8th, 2011, 06:18 AM
So why didn't they see if there were any supply stores like office max? Get lots of paper!
because it's a poorly written show?
It would have been nice to see (at least for a 5 to 10 sec spot) an enormous pile of paper, clothing, shoes, weapons, tools, piping, machine tools etc. with Young telling them to organize it in a storeroom just to "keep it real". That scene probably got axed to make room for the drama of varo surviving (without a broken bone) a 40 foot fall onto a concrete floor.

General Jumper One
May 8th, 2011, 06:52 AM
because it's a poorly written show?
It would have been nice to see (at least for a 5 to 10 sec spot) an enormous pile of paper, clothing, shoes, weapons, tools, piping, machine tools etc. with Young telling them to organize it in a storeroom just to "keep it real". That scene probably got axed to make room for the drama of varo surviving (without a broken bone) a 40 foot fall onto a concrete floor.


This has been discussed over and over, people have fallen from that and higher and are found to be perfectly fine, some guy fell over a 1000 ft climbing a mountain when search and rescue found him all he had were a couple of scratches, don't believe it then Google it.

morrismike
May 8th, 2011, 08:07 AM
This has been discussed over and over, people have fallen from that and higher and are found to be perfectly fine, some guy fell over a 1000 ft climbing a mountain when search and rescue found him all he had were a couple of scratches, don't believe it then Google it.
What are the odds of a 40' fall onto concrete not breaking a bone? I'm not arguing that it's impossible but just beyond believability (beyond 5 sigma).

Keeper
May 8th, 2011, 08:17 AM
Doubt it as we don't even know when that device came into being.. Was it before or after atlantis was made?

i believe merlin's phase-shifter came from the glastonbury hoard. this was either during the final settling of the MW by the ancients... or after merlin descended to work on the anti-ori weapon (at the time of king arthur.)

while it is entirely possible that a device, millions of years older, may have existed at time of destiny it is unlikely - remember, the phase-shifter is clearly identified as being made by merlin, and he was among the last of the ancients to leave atlantis. therefore, even if destiny were only several thousand years older than atlantis, it's hard to imagine that the ancients had only just finished the thing just in time to put it at glastonbury.

if i'm wrong that it comes from the glastonbury hoard... then it would have to come from one of the several planets seeded by arthurian remnants, which would definitively date the device to merlin's return to our plane. i say this based on the fact that it is developed by merlin, and that he seemed to be directly responsible for the round table and other aspects of the arthurian mythos.

garhkal
May 8th, 2011, 02:04 PM
because it's a poorly written show?
It would have been nice to see (at least for a 5 to 10 sec spot) an enormous pile of paper, clothing, shoes, weapons, tools, piping, machine tools etc. with Young telling them to organize it in a storeroom just to "keep it real". That scene probably got axed to make room for the drama of varo surviving (without a broken bone) a 40 foot fall onto a concrete floor.

Pity there is no mention of deleted scenes for the S2 dvd set.. would have been nice to see something as mudane as that make the list.

Shadow_7
May 9th, 2011, 09:26 AM
What are the odds of a 40' fall onto concrete not breaking a bone? I'm not arguing that it's impossible but just beyond believability (beyond 5 sigma).

The odds are always there. Perhaps he's sporting a personal protection device we've yet to find on him. Most times the thing that kills on those falls is that the center of gravity is towards your head and you land head first. More so with a body like Varro's. But the age old tales of the greedy old lady(s) tie-ing their bags of treasure to their feet when they jump out of a burning building. And surviving because they landed feet first, but did break almost every bone. But then again, they were old lady(s).

40' is not that far. It's like 80' or 90' that the surface tension of water resembles concrete upon impact. So it's feasible. Whether or not his brain isn't some mush bucket of porridge from the impact is the real question. Surviving is one thing, not needing a drool bucket aftewards is another thing.