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Ouroboros
October 15th, 2010, 12:43 AM
So if there's anything that a lot of sci-fi has in common it's that the human race typically tends to make at least some sort of appearance, and often ends up as the "chosen race" or otherwise the lynch pin around which events unfold.

So of all those myriad takes on humanity which one is/was your favorite. Which one appealed to you either because you thought it was particularly realistic, inspiring in some way, really captured the essence and spirit of the human race, or was just plain cool for whatever reason you care to share.

For me a long time favorite has been the "Terrans" from the extremely popular Starcraft game series.

This picture pretty much says it all.

http://i53.tinypic.com/a5i807.jpg

When nasty aliens come knocking and think they can push us around this is the kind of face I want greeting them, 14mm gauss rifle in hand.

Starcraft humanity has everything from your standard massive battlefleets of steely doom to intersteller nuclear missiles that can torch entire planets at the push of a button, psychic assassins, and "re-socialized" criminals as front line combat troops. I just love the whole "wild west frontier in space" atmosphere of the universe and the characters in it, as well as the comedic side to it all. It's something Firefly tried as well, but it's just not the same without the 7 foot rednecks in mechanical suits hopped up on combat stimms.

Feel free to list more than one if you want, I probably will later.

DigiFluid
October 15th, 2010, 01:43 AM
Tough call. One that immediately springs to mind for me is near the conclusion of Children of Men. All hope has been lost for a long time, but when it presents itself again people sit up, take notice, and stop trying to hurt one another--even if only for a moment. Something very powerful in that.

KEK
October 15th, 2010, 03:04 AM
Independence Day.

gotthammer
October 15th, 2010, 09:25 AM
No one for Warhammer 40,000's depiction of humanity as, for the most part, xenophobic, belligerent, narrow-minded and, perhaps, ultimately doomed? :D

My memory's a bit fuzzy on the details, but I think I like the way humanity, at least in terms of government (citizenship as something to be earned in order to participate), was depicted in Heinlein's 'Starship Troopers'.

That or any setting where humanity has established a, relatively, benevolent empire (Legend of the Galactic Heroes comes to mind).

Farscape's take on mankind was actually nice, too: highlighting both strengths and weaknesses (particularly in the 4th season).

Don't think I can pick one, tho'...

Ouroboros
October 15th, 2010, 08:11 PM
No one for Warhammer 40,000's depiction of humanity as, for the most part, xenophobic, belligerent, narrow-minded and, perhaps, ultimately doomed? :D

The Imperium of man was going to be the next one I mentioned actually. I almost included it in the opening post but figured Starcraft would be a bit more well known.

For those that don't know the Imperium is basically every cliche about how horrible the middle ages could be turned up to 11 and spread over an entire galaxy in a high tech space empire. It's got Inquisitors, religious zealots, crusades, Knights in the form of the super human space marines of the Adeptus Astartes, warrior nuns, and warships that look like flying cathedrals.

gotthammer
October 16th, 2010, 02:00 AM
...and where death doesn't necessarily mean and 'end' to your 'service' to the Imperium. :D
(cases-in-point: Space Marine Dreadnoughts and those-floating-skull-thingies-the-names-of-which-escape-me-at-the-moment :D ).

Of course, it also shows humanity's resilience: surrounded by foes within (the corrupting powers of Chaos, for example) and outside (aliens such as the Tau, Necrons, Eldar, Orks, Tyranids, and the 'physical' manifestations of Chaos in the form of the Traitor Legions), humanity still keeps on fighting (of course, a lot of 'em are indoctrinated/brainwashed into fighting for 'ye olde glorified lighthouse', aka the 'Emperor of Man').

Cool setting. Tho' it does feel rather 'stagnant' (in that nothing really big changes. Maybe a 'major character' will die or meet a 'bad fate', but the galaxy at large seems to remain the same).

xxxevilgrinxxx
October 16th, 2010, 08:27 AM
I tend to prefer dystopian views of our future rather than utopian so it would be dark

Children of men has been mentioned already, so that, and things like Book of Eli, etc

Also, movies like Bladerunner, Alien etc and, even as lighthearted as it was at times, Firefly

I don't see us getting "better" as a species and our existence will continue to be a struggle, mostly against ourselves

Janus
October 16th, 2010, 08:33 AM
BSG (Style)

nx01a
October 16th, 2010, 09:08 AM
Any future where we evolve into energy beings, really.:D
I think Babylon 5's depiction of humanity is quite realistic. We'd probably be like that if we got out into deep space.
The Star Trek universe where humanity's basically living in ultimate luxury [between Borg attacks and anomalies] is a pretty sweet existence.

Wayston
October 16th, 2010, 10:42 AM
<snip>

Skydiver
October 16th, 2010, 11:57 AM
I find that movie title to be offensive and really not appropriate here, especially linked with no warning.

DigiFluid
October 16th, 2010, 12:29 PM
Dang, and I missed it :(

KEK
October 16th, 2010, 01:43 PM
I'm guessing it was _______ From Outer Space?

Janus
October 16th, 2010, 02:10 PM
I'm guessing it was _______ From Outer Space?

Indeed

Cold Fuzz
October 16th, 2010, 08:08 PM
Any future where we evolve into energy beings, really.:D
I think Babylon 5's depiction of humanity is quite realistic. We'd probably be like that if we got out into deep space.
The Star Trek universe where humanity's basically living in ultimate luxury [between Borg attacks and anomalies] is a pretty sweet existence.

That's one of the reasons B5 is my favorite sci-fi show. Its realism about humanity, even humanity's darkest qualities, were explored. We got the full gamut with the characters: Sheridan's patriotism and honor, Ivanova's Russian seriousness, Garibaldi's and Marcus' humor, Franklin's thoughtfulness...the list goes on—all the way to Clark's murderous quest for power and even Max Eilerson's fondness for "entertainment" like Snow White and the Seven Narns and Who's Your Little Pak'ma'ra?

Morbo
October 17th, 2010, 07:00 PM
Firefly.

If only for the awesome way in which they speak.

Lainier
October 19th, 2010, 07:04 PM
Children of Men is very realistic: what the film shows could perfectly be our near future. I also like Blade Runner, with its dehumanized society, powerful corporations and polluted cities.

gotthammer
October 20th, 2010, 04:01 AM
Children of Men is very realistic: what the film shows could perfectly be our near future. I also like Blade Runner, with its dehumanized society, powerful corporations and polluted cities.

I found Children of Men's depiction rather depressing. :D
(I'm not sure I found it realistic...there were some bits which were 'odd'. Of course, if 'realistic' in the sense that humanity is heading toward a depressing future, then, yeah, I guess :lol: )

Blade Runner, while also a bit bleak, was more to my liking (I'm kinda a fan of 'cyberpunk'), but I think I prefer the 'cleaner' 'post-cyberpunk' setting of Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex/SAC 2nd Gig
Stephenson's 'Snow Crash' was also quite 'nice' in how he depicted humanity and the world (sure it's quite bleak, but rather funny at the same time :D )
While quite fantasy-ish, the cyberpunk-with-magic setting of Shadowrun was also one of my favourites for quite a while.

Lainier
October 20th, 2010, 07:22 AM
if 'realistic' in the sense that humanity is heading toward a depressing future, then, yeah, I guess
Yes, that's the point :D


Blade Runner, while also a bit bleak, was more to my liking
Blade Runner is my favorite film overall.


Ghost in the Shell: Stand Alone Complex/SAC 2nd Gig
I never understood why this great anime had only two seasons.

gotthammer
October 20th, 2010, 11:31 AM
I never understood why this great anime had only two seasons.

I dunno. It would be nice to see more in the future. Tho' it's kinda hard to top the two seasons + the movie (GitS: SAC: SSS)
The manga's also done with, right? (GitS, plus GitS:MMI then the one in between, I think)

Lainier
October 21st, 2010, 05:06 AM
The manga's also done with, right? (GitS, plus GitS:MMI then the one in between, I think)
Yes, that's right. Also, I'm still waiting for Appleseed - Book 5. The last one was from 1989!

gotthammer
October 21st, 2010, 06:04 AM
gah. Appleseed. I still haven't completed that one (I think I have vol. 1 AND 4 :D ).

Same goes for Dominion: I only have 'No More Noise' (that one was AWESOME, tho' :D I love Leona. Tank-loving cop chick who does weapon-based martial arts = win :D )
A pity the Tank SWAT thing didn't look so good.

MattSilver 3k
October 21st, 2010, 11:23 AM
Now that I've read up on the expanded universe novels, I gotta say that Halo's depiction of humanity in the future really interests me a bunch. Basically, like any good sci-fi story set in the future, humanity has branched out from Earth and have colonised other planets, but the rub is that there are still people against the United Nations Space Command folk - insurrectionists and terrorists and all kinds of fun that really cast a dull light on a future utopia... and that's before the aliens show up.

Man, these humans get messed up by this whole alien and insurrectionist wars. Billions killed by aliens, but the insurrectionists still don't dig the UNSC's vibe. The Office of Naval Intelligence has children kidnapped for their supersoldier program to help combat both threats, but as soon as the aliens come around, they begin to make the war look better to the folk in the inner colonies by playing up the supersoldier program - the Spartans officially never die, they're just missing in action.

These humans are just awesome in their pure *******ry sometimes, if you get me. Coverups, murder, all kinds of shifty politics, but it's to protect humanity from the alien threat. But despite it all, there are some seriously cool and self-sacrificing soldiers out on the field.

They initiate protocols so no aliens can follow them back home - people self-sacrifice themselves and their ships to avoid being captured if they can. If someone finds an open window to destroy them some aliens at the cost of their own personal lives, they will take it. The good ones understand all about the threat against them, and they don't give up, don't surrender. They go nuts and fight a very one-sided war, despite the odds being stacked against them so high...

Of course, there's still those bad human guys who would use a thousand orphans, train them up and sacrifice them at the first opportunity, but it's all for the good of humanity, and it's not clearcut good versus bad within our own race. I like it.

Crazy Tom
October 21st, 2010, 07:03 PM
In terms of realism, I have to give it to the Terragen Sphere in Orion's Arm.

It really bugs me that so few series out there actually address things like trans-humanism and the Singularity, even Banks, whose books I adore. In OA, most of the Terragen sphere would actually be classified as aliens in other universes, the kicker is that their all descendants of Humanity, in some way, shape or form.
It really shows how a species can grow and mature and diversify when it goes out into the universe.

jmoz
October 21st, 2010, 07:23 PM
Babylon 5, Firefly, Cowboy Bebop

Dan Simmons' Hyperion created a very memorable world, including some really out there scientific/spiritual worlds. I really liked the worlds he created in his books even if I disliked some of the plots.

maneth
October 23rd, 2010, 01:14 AM
Babylon 5 without a doubt. Seems very realistic with all the infighting in spite of a nominally unified planet.

EvilSpaceAlien
October 23rd, 2010, 01:17 AM
I would go with Firefly, Battlestar Galactica (new) and Caprica.

TBA
October 23rd, 2010, 05:46 AM
Caprica as well for me.