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Spimman
June 8th, 2010, 12:27 PM
I thought it might be good to have a forum to discuss British/Welsh culture, for those of us who don't really understand the differences or how accurate everything on TW is. I'm new to TW, but have watched them all and really enjoy that it shows (as far as I know) more of the British/Welsh culture than DW, who is always in different places. I'll put out a few questions for discussion and please expand or take it away from there. :) I'm in no way trying to make fun of the culture, I enjoy it, I just like to understand things!


Do British/Welsh people really drink that much tea?
Is Ianto a traditional Welsh or British name?
Are certain characters more Welsh/English and/or British?
How do British identify themselves? British or Welsh/English/Scottish/Irish?
Does British TV allow all the language on public broadcast?
Are Bloody and B***cks (spelling?) considered cuss words equal to the F or S word?

This should be a good start?

Madwelshboy
June 8th, 2010, 01:06 PM
Do British/Welsh people really drink that much tea?

Some do, not all.


Is Ianto a traditional Welsh or British name?

Its a Welsh name. Its the pet form of the name Ifan which in itself is one of the Welsh forms of John.


Are certain characters more Welsh/English and/or British?

Gwen is very much your typical South Wales girl, born and breed.


How do British identify themselves? British or Welsh/English/Scottish/Irish?

Personally i tend to find (based on where i grew up, and where i now work) that people identify themselves more with their home nation rather than British.


Does British TV allow all the language on public broadcast?

Depends on the channel and what time it airs.


Are Bloody and Bolux (spelling?) considered cuss words equal to the F or S word?

No, their more mild.

pbellosom
June 8th, 2010, 01:12 PM
Do British/Welsh people really drink that much tea?


We never had a revolution over the price of it :P

Spimman
June 8th, 2010, 01:15 PM
Personally i tend to find (based on where i grew up, and where i know work) that people identify themselves more with their home nation rather than British.

So Great Britain is the country and Wales, England, Scotland, N. Ireland are countries too? How does that actually work? I always thought each "Country" was much more independent than our US states. Very few US States take a ton of state pride, although most take some (Texas being the most since it was once an independent country).


We never had a revolution over the price of it :P

Yeah, hot tea for some reason kinda died out in the States :p From the show it seems like Hot Tea may be more popular than coffee over here, although it seems like Ianto can make a good cup of both! I personally enjoy a cup of Earl Grey from time to time, but I doubt I've ever really had a quality cup nor do I know how to make one!

They really never mention the type of Tea, is it assumed to be a certain type unless otherwise stated?

Madwelshboy
June 8th, 2010, 01:45 PM
So Great Britain is the country and Wales, England, Scotland, N. Ireland are countries too? How does that actually work? I always thought each "Country" was much more independent than our US states. Very few US States take a ton of state pride, although most take some (Texas being the most since it was once an independent country).

Great Britain is the largest island of the UK, made up of the countries England, Scotland and Wales. The UK is a sovereign state governed by a parliamentary system in London but with three devolved national administrations of varying powers in Belfast, Cardiff and Edinburgh, the capitals of Northern Ireland, Wales and Scotland respectively.

Hope that makes sence, though i dont know if it really answers your question, lol

Flyboy
June 8th, 2010, 06:24 PM
So Great Britain is the country and Wales, England, Scotland, N. Ireland are countries too? How does that actually work? I always thought each "Country" was much more independent than our US states. Very few US States take a ton of state pride, although most take some (Texas being the most since it was once an independent country).


Not quite. The United Kingdom of Great Britain & Northern Ireland is what we call a 'union state'. Wales is actually a principality, not technically a country (which is no insult, I live in Wales, and love the place to bits). Scotland and England are countries, though not what I would call nation states, because they are part of the overall union state, unlike say, France, which is in itself a Nation State (or Ankh-Morpork, a fictional city that resembles the power systems of centuries gone by, as a city-state).

Ultimatly, the United Kingdom is governed from London, but that does not MEAN England rules the UK. Parliament is totally representative of all the four territories in the UK.

I indentify as British, as Britain (there is, funnily enough, no UK national identity) is the international actor, and whilst Wales, Scotland, England, and Northern Ireland may at times vary in terms of domestic policy, such as education in particular, it is Britain, the combined might of four great states that interacts within the global community.

Skydiver
June 8th, 2010, 07:15 PM
hot tea pretty much died over here in the 1700's when England taxed the crud out of it in the colonies. anti british sentiments were such that it was often seen as an insult to drink it, coffee was a 'partriotic american drink'.

tea, however, is gaining a bit of popularity with green tea, etc, and seen as a 'kinder,gentler' drink than coffee, yet not as 'childish' as hot cocoa

here in the US, bloody and ********, well bloody is beyond tame. and ******** isn't commonly used.

ETA: hehehe, but the second B word IS apparently in the language filter

Skydiver
June 8th, 2010, 07:18 PM
tea is, well basically a late afternoon snack in the UK. When i've been over there, you have tea around 5pm or so, then dinner at 7pm or so. And it's just tea and maybe cookies or a simple light snack. Milk in tea is a taste sensation that isn't well known at all in the US. I like it, it makes the tea much milder and kinda a warm, soothing drink.

Spimman
June 8th, 2010, 08:44 PM
Do I need to edit the worl B****cks out of my original post? Seeing as it isn't used in the US I really didn't know if it was an off-limits word or not.

I wish I knew how to make fresh tea from something other than a little bag, never added milk or anything but I do in my coffee...I'll have to try it

Flyboy
June 9th, 2010, 02:50 AM
tea is, well basically a late afternoon snack in the UK. When i've been over there, you have tea around 5pm or so, then dinner at 7pm or so. And it's just tea and maybe cookies or a simple light snack. Milk in tea is a taste sensation that isn't well known at all in the US. I like it, it makes the tea much milder and kinda a warm, soothing drink.

Tea as a late afternoon snack? :)

Well.......... yes. Maybe.

But generally speaking, it's ALWAYS time for a cup of tea. And I mean ALWAYS. First thing in the morning, last thing before bed, 10 minute work break, WHILST working, when you get back from work, etc etc etc.

I honestly couldn't live without it. Yes - I AM a cliche.

Draygon
June 9th, 2010, 03:23 AM
Tea as a late afternoon snack? :)


Well I know that in northern England and Scotland, tea is a term used to mean you dinner while dinner is your lunch :P There was a huge debate about it before one of my lectures once. Bit of North/south riverly :P (To me they're all southerners though :P)

As to describing nationality, I have always said that I'm scottish before I say I'm brittish, and from personal experiance people do tend to say that thyy're English, or Welsh or Scottish or Irish ratehr than British.

Skydiver
June 9th, 2010, 04:10 AM
And the people that I stayed with in Nottingham treated tea as a snack, something to drink and maybe a cookie or two, then we had dinner at 7ish. so we had breakfast, a light lunch wherever we were touring (bowl of soup, sandwich, etc) then tea then dinner.

I know I have a collection of tea bags in my desk drawer for those 'dude, it's chilly in here, i need something warm to drink' moments.

as to the 'b' word, if you want to edit it out, you can. it's that one spelling that I used that's in the filter, but I also haven't been deluged with complaints about the word being in the post, so the offense level seems to be pretty low :)

Flyboy
June 9th, 2010, 06:52 AM
And the people that I stayed with in Nottingham treated tea as a snack, something to drink and maybe a cookie or two, then we had dinner at 7ish. so we had breakfast, a light lunch wherever we were touring (bowl of soup, sandwich, etc) then tea then dinner.

I know I have a collection of tea bags in my desk drawer for those 'dude, it's chilly in here, i need something warm to drink' moments.

as to the 'b' word, if you want to edit it out, you can. it's that one spelling that I used that's in the filter, but I also haven't been deluged with complaints about the word being in the post, so the offense level seems to be pretty low :)

The fact that Aunty Beeb (the BBC) seemed happy to have Cpt. E Blackadder use the phrase boll*cks in one of the episodes as part of a punch line indicates the inoffensive nature of the term. Ok, you don't want kiddywinks going round using it, but it's the least-offensive offensive word we have. In fact, I think sh*t is deemed more offensive in the UK.

Spimman
June 9th, 2010, 07:18 AM
Interesting indeed. By watching British TV, I would say US TV audiences have much higher offense levels when it comes to language, I didn't even know until recently Bloody or Bo***cks were curse words at all. TW would be rated R in the US without a doubt, for language and no other reason at all.

I would say in US the F*** word is hands down the most offensive (almost automatic R rating) and then the A**, S*** and B**** are considered offensive as well. Dam* and Hel* are considered cuss words, but I would say are the least offensive. There are other offensive words of a sexual nature but I'm not sure if they're considered "Cuss" words or not.

I find it quite interesting that we all "basically" speak the same language but at the same time there are so many differences, I guess we're kind of the mutts (term for mixed bread dog, you guys use that?) of the English speaking world ;)


**Side Note** Is Ianto pronounced Yanto?

Skydiver
June 9th, 2010, 06:21 PM
Ianto is pronounced Yanto

and there's a worse word than the F one...the C word.

Pharaoh Hamenthotep
June 9th, 2010, 09:36 PM
tea is, well basically a late afternoon snack in the UK. When i've been over there, you have tea around 5pm or so, then dinner at 7pm or so. And it's just tea and maybe cookies or a simple light snack. Milk in tea is a taste sensation that isn't well known at all in the US. I like it, it makes the tea much milder and kinda a warm, soothing drink.

Not where I live :p Dinner is around midday.. what some would call lunch and tea is the evening meal :p

I was on the phone to someone in London yesterday and he had trouble understanding me :eek:

Flyboy
June 10th, 2010, 02:57 AM
But in that case, Tea does not refer to a 'cup of tea', the word is being used synonymously with most people's 'dinner' or evening meal. Actual tea is not a factor ;)

Pharaoh Hamenthotep
June 10th, 2010, 03:36 PM
But what if I have a cup of tea at the same time? :p

Sometimes have four or five cups a day :eek: ... if you replace tea with coffee since I don't drink tea :weiranime42:

Flyboy
June 11th, 2010, 01:38 AM
But what if I have a cup of tea at the same time? :p

Sometimes have four or five cups a day :eek: ... if you replace tea with coffee since I don't drink tea :weiranime42:

I hereby cast you out of British society and deem you to be an undesirable! Be gone foul creature of the underworld!

Ukko
June 13th, 2010, 07:04 AM
Tea as a late afternoon snack? :)

Well.......... yes. Maybe.

But generally speaking, it's ALWAYS time for a cup of tea. And I mean ALWAYS. First thing in the morning, last thing before bed, 10 minute work break, WHILST working, when you get back from work, etc etc etc.

I honestly couldn't live without it. Yes - I AM a cliche.

My breakfast is sometimes just a cup of tea:D I also drink tea when i get hungry during the day. It tends to satisfy me untill its actually time to eat food.


Ianto is pronounced Yanto

and there's a worse word than the F one...the C word.

Coffee?:p

Pharaoh Hamenthotep
June 14th, 2010, 08:20 AM
<PH snip> :p

:eek:!! Ukko! *reports Ukko to the Mods* :D

Spimman
June 15th, 2010, 06:43 AM
Quote from an article I was reading about S4

"...hopefully some more U.K. signings to come as well, and a few American cast as well. That is part of the fun of the script as well, which is the culture clash. It's not just going to be, well ... you know how sometimes Americans crop up in dramas for no reason. This going to be the Americans puzzling at the Welsh, the Welsh not knowing what's going on in America ... there is a lot of fun with that.

Sounds like our discussion will live on and questions may start coming in the other direction! :)

Spimman
June 15th, 2010, 11:03 AM
What do you guys/gals call the queen?

Mom or Mum? I was watching Doctor Who S2 Ep2 and it sounded like Rose and the Doc kept calling her Mom, but I thought y'all said Mum instead of Mom. Maybe there were saying ma'am?

dosed150
June 15th, 2010, 02:27 PM
would always be ma'am, prince charles might call her mum though

pbellosom
June 15th, 2010, 05:04 PM
What do you guys/gals call the queen?

Mom or Mum? I was watching Doctor Who S2 Ep2 and it sounded like Rose and the Doc kept calling her Mom, but I thought y'all said Mum instead of Mom. Maybe there were saying ma'am?

LOL. So much. It's Ma'am.

Skydiver
June 15th, 2010, 05:45 PM
it's ma'am, that kinda sounds like mum because while we yanks would go 'maaaam' iwth a long A, the brits tend to go 'mum' cause they use a short a

Spimman
June 15th, 2010, 06:49 PM
:lol:

I thought it was strange for them to call her Mom/Mum, but I know some of the british intelligence (at least in movies) use those kind of names (or so I thought) and so I wasn't sure.


it's ma'am, that kinda sounds like mum because while we yanks would go 'maaaam' iwth a long A, the brits tend to go 'mum' cause they use a short a
I grew up and live in the South where ma'am is common and yes, we tend to draw that A out quite a bit differently!

Skydiver
June 15th, 2010, 07:21 PM
yanks tend to go 'ma'am' and pronounce all 4 letters, brits go mam and smash the three together into one :)

Flyboy
June 18th, 2010, 04:06 PM
Nopey.

Her Majesty is ma'am pronounced maaRm. Where as a female officer in the military is (supposed to be) ma'am, pronounced mam.

knowles2
August 11th, 2010, 06:38 AM
Interesting indeed. By watching British TV, I would say US TV audiences have much higher offense levels when it comes to language, I didn't even know until recently Bloody or Bo***cks were curse words at all. TW would be rated R in the US without a doubt, for language and no other reason at all.

I would say in US the F*** word is hands down the most offensive (almost automatic R rating) and then the A**, S*** and B**** are considered offensive as well. Dam* and Hel* are considered cuss words, but I would say are the least offensive. There are other offensive words of a sexual nature but I'm not sure if they're considered "Cuss" words or not.

I find it quite interesting that we all "basically" speak the same language but at the same time there are so many differences, I guess we're kind of the mutts (term for mixed bread dog, you guys use that?) of the English speaking world ;)


**Side Note** Is Ianto pronounced Yanto?

I think the English language is just a Mutt, very absorbent, very changeble an very adaptive. Us English are very much the same.

An same as Flying Bennett, I am walking clinche who drinks tea pretty much all the time, it the only hot drink I drink regularly, cannot stand coffee. An I am of cause always planning on taking over the world an doing evil things, with a posh accent of cause.

Alan
October 31st, 2010, 07:36 AM
I thought it might be good to have a forum to discuss British/Welsh culture, for those of us who don't really understand the differences or how accurate everything on TW is. I'm new to TW, but have watched them all and really enjoy that it shows (as far as I know) more of the British/Welsh culture than DW, who is always in different places. I'll put out a few questions for discussion and please expand or take it away from there. :) I'm in no way trying to make fun of the culture, I enjoy it, I just like to understand things!


Do British/Welsh people really drink that much tea?
Is Ianto a traditional Welsh or British name?
Are certain characters more Welsh/English and/or British?
How do British identify themselves? British or Welsh/English/Scottish/Irish?
Does British TV allow all the language on public broadcast?
Are Bloody and B***cks (spelling?) considered cuss words equal to the F or S word?

This should be a good start?

I just want to answer the one I've put in Bold there from my personal perspective: I live in Wales. My dad's originally from Scotland and my mum's from Wales. I consider myself to be British with Welsh/Scottish Nationality. My accent is non-regional.

shipper hannah
July 7th, 2011, 04:27 PM
What do you guys/gals call the queen?

Mom or Mum? I was watching Doctor Who S2 Ep2 and it sounded like Rose and the Doc kept calling her Mom, but I thought y'all said Mum instead of Mom. Maybe there were saying ma'am?

When you meet her you are first supposed to call her "Your Majesty" and subsequently "Ma'am" (rhymes with "ham"). Mum is what you call your mother (unless you live in the NE England, then you say Mam!).

shipper hannah
July 7th, 2011, 04:28 PM
Woah.. old thread. Whoops.

Matt G
July 9th, 2011, 03:41 PM
I thought it might be good to have a forum to discuss British/Welsh culture, for those of us who don't really understand the differences or how accurate everything on TW is. I'm new to TW, but have watched them all and really enjoy that it shows (as far as I know) more of the British/Welsh culture than DW, who is always in different places. I'll put out a few questions for discussion and please expand or take it away from there. :) I'm in no way trying to make fun of the culture, I enjoy it, I just like to understand things!


Do British/Welsh people really drink that much tea?
Is Ianto a traditional Welsh or British name?
Are certain characters more Welsh/English and/or British?
How do British identify themselves? British or Welsh/English/Scottish/Irish?
Does British TV allow all the language on public broadcast?
Are Bloody and B***cks (spelling?) considered cuss words equal to the F or S word?

This should be a good start?

In terms of tea drinking I know a few walking cliches in RL but I personally prefer coffee and worship at the altar of the Flat White!

Never heard the name Ianto outside TW to be honest so will bow down to the Welsh people on that.

Owen is a stereotypical Cockney/Londoner, as for the Welsh characters, again I bow down to those on the other side of the Severn.

I was born and have lived most of my life in England but spent a few years living in Scotland and have a Welsh Mum. I consider myself British. However I have to admit that that is a rare sentiment nowadays.

How much language is allowed depends on the time of day.

They're cuss words but "bloody" is pretty minor though B-cks is heavier

Linda06
July 12th, 2011, 11:38 AM
Do British/Welsh people really drink that much tea?

Can't speak for everybody but I drink lots of Tea :D


How do British identify themselves? British or Welsh/English/Scottish/Irish?

I identity myself as Scottish. Scottish and Proud :D


tea is, well basically a late afternoon snack in the UK. When i've been over there, you have tea around 5pm or so, then dinner at 7pm or so. And it's just tea and maybe cookies or a simple light snack. Milk in tea is a taste sensation that isn't well known at all in the US. I like it, it makes the tea much milder and kinda a warm, soothing drink.

I call it Tea Time sometimes. It's when I have my main meal at around 5 - 5.30pm.

Do the Americans not take Milk in their Tea? :S ewwwwww. I can't drink Tea black :eek:


Well I know that in northern England and Scotland, tea is a term used to mean you dinner while dinner is your lunch :P There was a huge debate about it before one of my lectures once. Bit of North/south riverly :P (To me they're all southerners though :P

I do that sometimes :D Tea time is Dinner time and Dinner time is Lunch time :p And breakfast is Breakfast, the most important meal of the day :D

dipsofjazz
July 12th, 2011, 12:43 PM
:D I'll just 'ditto' Linda's post.

Edinburgh natives are thought of, by other Scots, as being mean. There is a famous phrase that they are supposed to utter if you visit them - "You'll have had your tea." It is said as a statement rather than a question. :P

dosed150
July 14th, 2011, 02:03 PM
thought the last scene of the teaser at the end of the first episode was funny, when someone from dollhouse called gwen english and gwen punched her and said im welsh

as for national identity i consider myself british

and im another coffee drinking heretic

Ed
July 14th, 2011, 02:25 PM
Quick run down on how the UK works it's a bit complex as we haven't had a clean slate constitutionally since well 1066 compounded by the fact non of it is written down

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rNu8XDBSn10

That vid does skip of the complexities of the crown that's some pedantic insanity you could spend an hour on and will probably upset people with strong opinions on Irish terminology as that's contentious you could spend hours on it.
This should show that British national identity is totally incomprehensible the only hard rule is dont mix the home nations eg dont call a welsh person English or any other combination.


On Tea very popular one of those reasonably deserved stereotypes

Tanith0709
July 14th, 2011, 03:36 PM
thought the last scene of the teaser at the end of the first episode was funny, when someone from dollhouse called gwen english and gwen punched her and said im welsh

lol, I'd have a similar reaction. I tend to find that Scotland tends to be more nationalist than the other parts of the UK and would put you right immediately if anyone called us English.

dosed150
July 14th, 2011, 07:09 PM
lol, I'd have a similar reaction. I tend to find that Scotland tends to be more nationalist than the other parts of the UK and would put you right immediately if anyone called us English.

I think the perception of people who call themselves english instead of british tends to be that their the wrong kind of nationalist, whereas scottish or welsh people who dont refer to themselves as British it seems more acceptable and not really racist

although when people say their english, scottish etc not british i like to remind them they must not be wanting their british passports

IcarusAbides
July 15th, 2011, 12:05 AM
I think the perception of people who call themselves english instead of british tends to be that their the wrong kind of nationalist, whereas scottish or welsh people who dont refer to themselves as British it seems more acceptable and not really racist

although when people say their english, scottish etc not british i like to remind them they must not be wanting their british passports

I think that a lot of English people don't differentiate between being referred to as English or British as the majority of them see Britain as being English.

Tanith0709
July 15th, 2011, 05:58 AM
the majority of them see Britain as being English.
Which is okay, but when other countries think the same it really does piss off people from the other parts of the UK.

I get annoyed when people think that Scotland is part of England.

IcarusAbides
July 15th, 2011, 07:04 AM
Which is okay, but when other countries think the same it really does piss off people from the other parts of the UK.

I get annoyed when people think that Scotland is part of England.

I'm not sure it is okay really but it's the way most people are, I can understand why people from Scotland and Wales are constantly annoyed by this.

Linda06
July 15th, 2011, 07:18 AM
Quick run down on how the UK works it's a bit complex as we haven't had a clean slate constitutionally since well 1066 compounded by the fact non of it is written down

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rNu8XDBSn10

That vid does skip of the complexities of the crown that's some pedantic insanity you could spend an hour on and will probably upset people with strong opinions on Irish terminology as that's contentious you could spend hours on it.
This should show that British national identity is totally incomprehensible the only hard rule is dont mix the home nations eg dont call a welsh person English or any other combination.


On Tea very popular one of those reasonably deserved stereotypes

Did you get all that then. Parts of it were quite funny :p


lol, I'd have a similar reaction. I tend to find that Scotland tends to be more nationalist than the other parts of the UK and would put you right immediately if anyone called us English.

They'd probably get a Glesga' kiss for their trouble :p


I think the perception of people who call themselves english instead of british tends to be that their the wrong kind of nationalist, whereas scottish or welsh people who dont refer to themselves as British it seems more acceptable and not really racist

although when people say their english, scottish etc not british i like to remind them they must not be wanting their british passports

I don't have a passport :D

dosed150
July 15th, 2011, 05:14 PM
Did you get all that then. Parts of it were quite funny :p



They'd probably get a Glesga' kiss for their trouble :p



I don't have a passport :D

so youve never been to somewhere that doesnt rain all the time :)

Linda06
July 16th, 2011, 03:14 AM
so youve never been to somewhere that doesnt rain all the time :)

Nope :D I don't like the sun ;) So you could say I'm in the right place :p

Lahela
July 17th, 2011, 05:41 AM
You lot should try being a colonial from a country that's not part of Britain. We've got to queue to get in and get grilled about why we're there and what we're doing and when we're leaving, we're not allowed to work without jumping through a thousand hoops and can't get the dole, but we're still lumbered with England's queen! :p

dipsofjazz
July 17th, 2011, 05:50 AM
You lot should try being a colonial from a country that's not part of Britain. We've got to queue to get in and get grilled about why we're there and what we're doing and when we're leaving, we're not allowed to work without jumping through a thousand hoops and can't get the dole, but we're still lumbered with England's queen! :p
*sigh* She's the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Not England!

Lahela
July 17th, 2011, 06:51 AM
*sigh* She's the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Not England!

I know, but the attitude in Australia tends to be "mother England and her Queen". It's odd.

ETA. If we're going to get technical, isn't she the queen of the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Jamaica, Barbados, the Bahamas, Grenada, Papua New Guinea, the Solomon Islands, Tuvalu, Saint Lucia, Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, Belize, Antigua and Barbuda, and Saint Kitts and Nevis? ;)

But this is getting wildly offtopic.

I like tea. Black, 2 sugars. :)

Tanith0709
July 17th, 2011, 06:01 PM
*sigh* She's the Queen of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Not England!

To be honest I prefer to think of her as being the Queen of England (I'm sooooo not a royalist) :P

dipsofjazz
July 18th, 2011, 04:28 AM
To be honest I prefer to think of her as being the Queen of England (I'm sooooo not a royalist) :P
I don't care one way or the other about them, but the point was that we've just had many posts about how the Scots, Welsh and Northern Irish don't like it when people think of the UK as England.

Flyboy
July 18th, 2011, 02:13 PM
I don't care one way or the other about them, but the point was that we've just had many posts about how the Scots, Welsh and Northern Irish don't like it when people think of the UK as England.

Neither do I.

I am English by birth, but it offends me when England is used synonymously with British.

I consider myself British, and that means pride in all aspects of Britain, which includes the unique Welsh and Scottish cultures which I love.

Alan
July 18th, 2011, 08:30 PM
Neither do I.

I am English by birth, but it offends me when England is used synonymously with British.

I consider myself British, and that means pride in all aspects of Britain, which includes the unique Welsh and Scottish cultures which I love.

I'm the same. I was born in Wales to a Scottish Dad and a Welsh mum. I consider myself British of Welsh/Scottish (or Scottish/Welsh) nationality. I too hate it when the WHOLE of the UK is referred to as England. It feels more difficult being in Wales. Like we're forgotten about sometimes and sometimes...ESPECIALLY with America...I think we need to speak up to remind people we're here and not happy being under the "England" umbrella any more.

I remember going to Spain once and the rep was seeing who from the coach staying at the hotel was from what part of the UK:

REP: Do we have anyone from England?

GUESTS: Yeah!!!

REP: Anyone here from Scotland?

GUESTS: Yeah!!!

REP: Do we have anyone here from Ireland?

GUESTS: Yeah!!!

At this point the Rep continues and gives the usual hotel welcome spiel, the time dinner is served etc. And I'm sat there thinking (hopefully with several others) "Errr...aren't you forgetting somewhere?? Wales maybe??" Before I could speak out someone else did and raised the question. Hopefully the rep won't make that mistake again. As I said above...it feels more difficult being in Wales and that we need to shout sometimes to remind people Wales does exist and that it most certainly does not fall under the "England" umbrella just as Scotland and Ireland don't.

Spimman
July 22nd, 2011, 08:28 AM
At this point the Rep continues and gives the usual hotel welcome spiel, the time dinner is served etc. And I'm sat there thinking (hopefully with several others) "Errr...aren't you forgetting somewhere?? Wales maybe??" Before I could speak out someone else did and raised the question. Hopefully the rep won't make that mistake again. As I said above...it feels more difficult being in Wales and that we need to shout sometimes to remind people Wales does exist and that it most certainly does not fall under the "England" umbrella just as Scotland and Ireland don't.

I didn't understand Wales to be a separate country (or whatever) until the last few years and the whole thing (with all the countries being part of one country :S) is still a little confusing to me but I kind of get it.

Alan
July 22nd, 2011, 10:51 AM
I didn't understand Wales to be a separate country (or whatever) until the last few years and the whole thing (with all the countries being part of one country :S) is still a little confusing to me but I kind of get it.

Thank you and I'm glad. :) I think its a good help for Wales, Scotland, and England (not so much Ireland I don't think) when explaining to others outside the UK that referring to the whole island as "England" is completely and utterly wrong. I have a friend in the US and I explained to them when we first started talking that Wales isn't in England it is in the UK just as England is also in the UK. Hopefully when anybody asks my American friend "hows your English friend?" they will correct them and with myself and other Brits hopefully explaining to others on-line in forums like this it will get people to spread the word to their friends where they live too.

Flyboy
July 23rd, 2011, 12:17 PM
Thank you and I'm glad. :) I think its a good help for Wales, Scotland, and England (not so much Ireland I don't think) when explaining to others outside the UK that referring to the whole island as "England" is completely and utterly wrong. I have a friend in the US and I explained to them when we first started talking that Wales isn't in England it is in the UK just as England is also in the UK. Hopefully when anybody asks my American friend "hows your English friend?" they will correct them and with myself and other Brits hopefully explaining to others on-line in forums like this it will get people to spread the word to their friends where they live too.

Though am I not correct in saying that Wales is, in fact, not a country, but a principality?

And that's not me trying to put it down. I love Wales with all my heart, wish I still lived there. It's my favourite component of Britain, and where I consider 'home', if home is where the heart is...

Alan
July 24th, 2011, 03:20 PM
Though am I not correct in saying that Wales is, in fact, not a country, but a principality?

And that's not me trying to put it down. I love Wales with all my heart, wish I still lived there. It's my favourite component of Britain, and where I consider 'home', if home is where the heart is...

I think its been said by the Welsh Assembly and the British government that even though it is connected to England and part of the UK, Wales is a country in its own right.

Spimman
July 25th, 2011, 11:12 AM
Is the United Kingdom a(the) country? If so are England, Wales, Scottland...all countries as well? Counties within a country? This is where my head starts to hurt.

On a side note, assuming Gwen has a true Welsh accent...I love it!

SaberBlade
July 25th, 2011, 11:26 AM
Is the United Kingdom a(the) country? If so are England, Wales, Scottland...all countries as well? Counties within a country? This is where my head starts to hurt.

On a side note, assuming Gwen has a true Welsh accent...I love it!

The United Kingdom is four countries; England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. England, Scotland and Wales are collectively known as Great Britain, which excludes Northern Ireland, as Northern Ireland isn't connected to the same landmass that makes up the other three.

Also, it is a real Welsh accent.

Spimman
July 25th, 2011, 12:25 PM
The United Kingdom is four countries; England, Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland. England, Scotland and Wales are collectively known as Great Britain, which excludes Northern Ireland, as Northern Ireland isn't connected to the same landmass that makes up the other three.

Also, it is a real Welsh accent.

So then what exactly is the United Kingdom, since it isn't a country? Does this really come down to vocabulary?

How is the United States different from the United Kingdom? We called ours states and you call yours countries? Other than the vocabulary is there much of a difference?

Lahela
July 25th, 2011, 01:10 PM
I don't care one way or the other about them, but the point was that we've just had many posts about how the Scots, Welsh and Northern Irish don't like it when people think of the UK as England.

I know I'm coming back to this late, but I did not and never would claim that the UK = England. I said Liz was Queen of England, which she is. As well as Queen of a whole lot of other countries.

I don't like it when people assume I'm an ignoramus :p

Flyboy
July 25th, 2011, 01:35 PM
So then what exactly is the United Kingdom, since it isn't a country? Does this really come down to vocabulary?

How is the United States different from the United Kingdom? We called ours states and you call yours countries? Other than the vocabulary is there much of a difference?


Ok. The idea of a 'country' isn't actually that important anyway. The UK is what is referred to in International Relations as a 'Union-State'. Most 'States' are in fact 'Nation-States'. For example, France, Germany, Canada. The USA, well frankly, I have no idea but I suspect, despite the fact it has individual 'states' as part of it, it is in fact, one giant 'State'.

Interestingly, I think there's a growing trend in IR for the Union-State to supercede the Nation-state, which in turn succeeded the City-State.

It doesn't matter that the UK is not, in fact, a country. What matters is that it itself is a single state made up of several components.

At least three countries, and either a fourth country or a principality, depending on how Wales is classed. I'm sure that when I started my degree course five years ago it was definitely NOT a country, and was a 'principality', but I can't swear that it still is.

dipsofjazz
July 25th, 2011, 03:25 PM
I know I'm coming back to this late, but I did not and never would claim that the UK = England. I said Liz was Queen of England, which she is. As well as Queen of a whole lot of other countries.

I don't like it when people assume I'm an ignoramus :p
In 1707 with the Act of Union, the monarch became King/Queen of Great Britain, since the kingdom was now united.

dipsofjazz
July 25th, 2011, 03:26 PM
I know I'm coming back to this late, but I did not and never would claim that the UK = England. I said Liz was Queen of England, which she is. As well as Queen of a whole lot of other countries.

I don't like it when people assume I'm an ignoramus :p
In 1707 with the Act of Union, the title of the monarch became King/Queen of Great Britain, since the kingdom was now united.

Lahela
July 25th, 2011, 10:54 PM
In 1707 with the Act of Union, the title of the monarch became King/Queen of Great Britain, since the kingdom was now united.

Okay, I made an error of terminology for which I apologise. That still doesn't mean I said that England = UK. ;)

Flyboy
July 26th, 2011, 11:04 AM
FYI - I was wrong. :) Thankfully so. Wales isn't a principality any more.

LoneStar1836
July 26th, 2011, 11:30 AM
I think its been said by the Welsh Assembly and the British government that even though it is connected to England and part of the UK, Wales is a country in its own right.That's what I remember being taught in school in the US back in the '90s....that Wales was one of the countries that made up the UK...or that it was at least a part of the UK. I've always understood the concept of the UK and the individual countries that comprise it. *shrug*

And I certainly wouldn't call some one from Scotland/Wales/N. Ireland "English". :D Though being from the South, I would never ever refer to myself as a "Yank" or "Yankee" as some of you peeps across the pond sometimes refer to Americans. :P

Spimman
July 26th, 2011, 11:37 AM
Ok. The idea of a 'country' isn't actually that important anyway. The UK is what is referred to in International Relations as a 'Union-State'. Most 'States' are in fact 'Nation-States'. For example, France, Germany, Canada. The USA, well frankly, I have no idea but I suspect, despite the fact it has individual 'states' as part of it, it is in fact, one giant 'State'.

Interestingly, I think there's a growing trend in IR for the Union-State to supercede the Nation-state, which in turn succeeded the City-State.

It doesn't matter that the UK is not, in fact, a country. What matters is that it itself is a single state made up of several components.

At least three countries, and either a fourth country or a principality, depending on how Wales is classed. I'm sure that when I started my degree course five years ago it was definitely NOT a country, and was a 'principality', but I can't swear that it still is.

Thanks, that sorta makes sense. I guess you're right, it doesn't really matter. I would say our States operate in similar ways to British countries, but not exactly since having 50 states kind of dilutes the pool a little more so we mostly consider ourselves American and just say we're from a certain state. The major difference is like in how the people view the states\countries in relation to the overall overall Union-State. Texas being the possible exception but it is the only state that was an independent nation at one point in history.

I wonder, 50 years from now, as the EU continues to gain more Federal Powers how this little discussion will change. The EU will be the Union-State with the UK being a part of it and England, Wales, Scottland, N Ireland being a part of it. :confused:

Aeron
February 10th, 2012, 11:11 AM
Do British/Welsh people really drink that much tea?
I do, but I also drink as much coffee. There's nothing like drinking a lot of tea and eating a lot of buttered scones though.

Is Ianto a traditional Welsh or British name?
Welsh. If an English person was called Ianto, it would be a bit weird unless you had one English parent, or at least two Welsh grandparents.

Are certain characters more Welsh/English and/or British?
Gwen, Andy and Rhys were quite Welsh. All the others were quite English, I think!

How do British identify themselves? British or Welsh/English/Scottish/Irish?
It depends, really. I'm English, but I have Welsh and Scottish grandparents, so I can identify myself as British. British is just an umbrella term I think. It's mostly English/Irish/Scottish/Welsh.

Does British TV allow all the language on public broadcast?
Yeah, if it's after the 9pm watershed. Most words but the F and C word can be used, I think? Then after 10pm it's usually anything but the C word, which you can probably say after 11pm but I'm not sure. Bloody can be used at pretty much any time.

Are Bloody and B***cks (spelling?) considered cuss words equal to the F or S word?
No, bloody is mild. I've never heard it used in the mornings but afternoons seems to be fine. The other B word is usually for after 9pm, but isn't considered as bad as the F and S words - at least, not where I come from.

I'm usually clueless so, take that all with a grain.