PDA

View Full Version : Why the episode title HUMAN?



kansaikimono
April 30th, 2010, 12:10 PM
I admit that I haven't read all the other Forum posts and maybe I've missed something out there, but why do you think this episode was titled "Human?" The other episode titles have been pretty obvious, but this one isn't so clear to me. Is it that we're seeing the vulnerability of some characters and thus they're suddenly more human than previously presented? Or is it a chromosome reference? Maybe there was something in the episode I missed and I need to watch it again?

The Mighty 6 platoon
April 30th, 2010, 12:13 PM
I admit that I haven't read all the other Forum posts and maybe I've missed something out there, but why do you think this episode was titled "Human?" The other episode titles have been pretty obvious, but this one isn't so clear to me. Is it that we're seeing the vulnerability of some characters and thus they're suddenly more human than previously presented? Or is it a chromosome reference? Maybe there was something in the episode I missed and I need to watch it again?

Well the most obvious example would be that it showed the "Human" side of Rush.

~Robert~
April 30th, 2010, 12:19 PM
^ Agree with mighty 6 , the whole episode pretty much showed us that rush is " Human " after all .

Serebii
April 30th, 2010, 12:22 PM
Not to mention the whole human 23 base-pair 46 chromosome factor at the end of the episode

Combination of factors...boom the title appears

The Mighty 6 platoon
April 30th, 2010, 12:35 PM
So in conclusion, kansaikimono, you sort of answered your own question in your post. :D

kansaikimono
April 30th, 2010, 12:40 PM
But if the episode title is a reference to Rush, then what does that imply about the others on board? Are we supposed to believe that Rush is the only one who needs to be "humanized" for us so that we have sympathy for him?

jelgate
April 30th, 2010, 12:41 PM
Its to see if Rush is human or a emotionless robot:P

Honestly Rush has been depited as a cold logical man. Its to show Rush's more emotional side

carmencatalina
April 30th, 2010, 12:51 PM
The episode was originally entitled "Lucid", which I actually think would have been a better title (referring, I think, to Rush's lucid dream state).

kansaikimono
April 30th, 2010, 01:00 PM
All right. Here's something else to ponder (and I'll withhold my own opinions because I'm more interested in hearing what you all have to say).

"To err is human; to forgive divine."

Chloe is bothered that her relationship with Eli is suffering as a result of her participation in the recent, but unsuccessful coup. Does she believe that she has made a mistake and if so, what does she do to correct it?

Scott and the others are trapped below in the tunnel. He admits that he made a mistake in judgment.

Rush wrestles with his guilt at the way he treated his wife during his last days with her. Does he find forgiveness? Was his experience in the chair about more than just finding the code?

DestinyAscension
April 30th, 2010, 01:10 PM
Its PROBABLY the chromosome reference. Rush found out a clue to unlocking the Destiny's systems, 46. Which is the amount of chromosomes each Human possesses. (even though that's really common knowledge)

Wayston
April 30th, 2010, 02:57 PM
Yeah it's a play on the human chromosome which he finds out is the answer he was looking for as he spends time with his wife and she reminds him of his human side

Artemis-Neith
April 30th, 2010, 04:35 PM
I think the title is ambiguous. In fact we've seen two separated and independent ideas of human during the episode:
1. We saw a very human side of Rush (and in some smaller scenes also from other figures), and
2. The human gene code as a hint to unlock the systems of Destiny.

haloplayer
April 30th, 2010, 10:09 PM
Its to see if Rush is human or a emotionless robot:P

Honestly Rush has been depited as a cold logical man. Its to show Rush's more emotional side

Of COURSE Rush is human, after all if he was a Robot it would be to much.....wait for it......LIKE BSG.

MattSilver 3k
April 30th, 2010, 10:27 PM
It was originally titled "Lucid". I think that one made more sense to me.

EllieVee
May 1st, 2010, 11:23 PM
For someone who gets accused of being cold and logical, Rush has a deeply expressive face. Every emotion is there. Pragmatism and logic do not negate emotion.

kansaikimono
May 2nd, 2010, 10:48 AM
Carlyle's genius as an actor is his ability to act with his face, especially his eyes. It's why I enjoy watching his work. He changes so drastically from one film to another that the man disappears and only the character is on screen. I mean, are Hamish Macbeth, Begbie, and Nicholas Rush really played by the same man?!

I have to agree that Rush is not, at heart, cold and logical. However, in his dream sequence, he and Gloria talk about the changes that have occurred in him since her death. She says he's become callous. He says he's able to make the hard decisions (something he accuses Young of not being able to do).

There's a children's book entitled, The Boy Who Didn't Want to be Sad or something like that. The child doesn't want to be unhappy, so he rids himself of everything that does: locks his pets outside of the house because one day they might die, won't eat ice cream because it might melt and fall off the cone, throws away his toys because they might break, etc. In the end, the boy realizes that these are the very things that make him happy and that happiness is a part of sadness. You can't have one without the other.

I think Rush has recently discovered the same thing. Until now, we've only seen the post-Gloria Rush. He treats people as objects. Look at his obsequious behavior in front of the Senator, the aggressive, sometimes threatening tone with Young, the peerage mannerisms with Wray, and the patronizing remarks to Eli. This "isn't the man I married" Gloria tells him.

We've seen this in characters in other stories. The pain of losing someone is so great that they believe if they can somehow stop feeling, they can avoid any future pain. Consequently, they come across as "cold and logical." In Rush's case, and this is credit to Carlyle, Rush tries to act cold and uncaring. He won't eat with the others, obviously has no friends, bullies the other scientists, and apparently feels no guilt after framing Young for murder. Yet deep down he knows this isn't who he really is and it comes out at Gloria's bedside. "I've never been your conscience." Carlye's facial expressions throughout the series have been our biggest clue that Rush has an internal conflict, that who he is with others is not who he is at heart.

I think in episodes to come, we're going to see more of the Rush that Gloria knew. Maybe the real Rush was emerging just before "Human," and maybe that's why his internal conflict was wrapped around his need to find the code. Only recently he rescued Chloe, sat down at the dinner table with a group of people, and made a "hard decision" that favored people over purpose ("Divided"). In "Lost" he leads the expedition to find Scott, Greer, and Chloe - not an easy task physically or mentally. And he seems to be altering the way he addresses people - not so much contempt.

In this thread I'm asking how the title, "Human" is appropriate. Previous titles have applied to the group as a whole, but this one applies just to Rush? I'm not so sure. Maybe "Humanity" would have been a better title, but I think most of you are right in that "Lucid" is more appropriate. The dream sequence makes is more clear where to find the code and it clarifies a personal issue Rush is having.

Now look at the other characters in conjunction with Rush. If the B story also benefits by the title, how does "Human" apply to Scott, Greer, and Chloe?