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View Full Version : Rush - What is he really after?



erotavlas
April 24th, 2010, 07:35 AM
So we see that Rush was working hard on the 9th chevron project while his wife was dying. He never really spent enough time with her in the end. It seems to me like he doesn't want all that work he did while his wife was dying to be in vain. Like he has to follow through with the mission at all costs otherwise neglecting his wife all that time would have been for nothing.

In that case it could be he's not really after anything specific (particularly not ascension - at least not as his primary objective), but rather the discovery of the destiny and the knowledge within as a whole.

Maybe he's just hoping for any new and significant insight or discovery into the ancients regardless of what it is, in hopes that his work wasn't for nothing. (i.e. he can feel better for his actions at least)

thekillman
April 24th, 2010, 07:52 AM
i think his motivation is, that it's the only goal and use in life he has left

JustAnotherVoice
April 24th, 2010, 07:56 AM
I see it as Rush trying to escape from the reality of the situation. He threw himself into his work during the final months of his wife's life as a method of "coping" with his loss by not dealing with it - he quite literally left his problems several million miles (light years?) behind. The survivor's guilt that has been plaguing him turned him into the bitter, angry, self loathing man we knew until this episode, and now that he's (apparently) finally had a cathartic experience, maybe we can see who the real Nicholas Rush is.

How this affects his motivations, I haven't the foggiest. I doubt he'll suddenly become apologetic for all the things he's done, nor would he excuse any scientific curiosity he has. He wouldn't have agreed to join Icarus if he wasn't curious on some level about the answers to the universe, so perhaps that will remain his primary motivator, just without the baggage of the guilt that drove him to Destiny.

Commander Zelix
April 24th, 2010, 08:00 AM
I always thought he was in for his wife. Now I'm not sure. But Rush has been very clear in Time:

RUSH: Of course, the Ancients evolved to a point where their physical bodies were no longer necessary, found a way for consciousness to become immortal.

WALLACE: D'you really think that's possible?

RUSH (determinedly): I know it is.

(He pauses for a moment, then smiles awkwardly at Eli.)

RUSH: Maybe not for you and me, but that idea - it's the reason why I ended up here.

WALLACE (hesitantly): So, you think if we learn enough, that-that somehow, somewhere out there, we could discover how it's done?

(Rush doesn't answer for a long time but finally half turns towards Eli.)

RUSH: We have to make it through the day.

SaberBlade
April 24th, 2010, 08:37 AM
Rush's motivation is to never return home. He doesn't want Destiny going back to Earth, he wants it all for himself. He'd do anything to stay on the ship, and he'd do even more to make sure he can do whatever he wants on the ship.

escyos
April 24th, 2010, 08:39 AM
i think his motivation is, that it's the only goal and use in life he has left

that makes sense, he doesnt have anything left,except Destiny and im pretty sure while he would like to find a way to bring his wife back he knows it wont happen.

General Jumper One
April 24th, 2010, 08:51 AM
Ascension

_SocraticMethod
April 24th, 2010, 08:53 AM
Does anyone else think it's plausible that Rush has a motivation similar to Malakai from "Window of Opportunity"? Perhaps it seems unlikely that this was his motivation upon leaving Icarus through the gate; but maybe now that he's on Destiny.... I mean, he knows an awful lot about the Ancients and obviously has a great deal of reverence for their abilities. Maybe he's hoping he'll find a way to 'turn back time', as it were, and get his wife back?
It maybe a little bit like Annorax in ST: VOY as well (i.e. "Year of Hell")....

Commander Zelix
April 24th, 2010, 08:55 AM
Does anyone else think it's plausible that Rush has a motivation similar to Malakai from "Window of Opportunity"? Perhaps it seems unlikely that this was his motivation upon leaving Icarus through the gate; but maybe now that he's on Destiny.... I mean, he knows an awful lot about the Ancients and obviously has a great deal of reverence for their abilities. Maybe he's hoping he'll find a way to 'turn back time', as it were, and get his wife back?
It maybe a little bit like Annorax in ST: VOY as well (i.e. "Year of Hell")....
I always thought that he was doing it to save his wife like the obsessed Annorax (such a great story), no matter the consequences. But with Human, I'm not quite sure. In Time, he clearly state that he's in for the ascension thing.

_SocraticMethod
April 24th, 2010, 09:09 AM
I always thought that he was doing it to save his wife like the obsessed Annorax (such a great story), no matter the consequences. But with Human, I'm not quite sure. In Time, he clearly state that he's in for the ascension thing.

Mhmm, you're right, he does. But I always wondered: ascension to what end? He just doesn't strike me as the Daniel type, to want ascension out of a desire for wisdom... Perhaps he thinks he can find a way to get his wife back that way?

erotavlas
April 24th, 2010, 09:12 AM
Does anyone else think it's plausible that Rush has a motivation similar to Malakai from "Window of Opportunity"? Perhaps it seems unlikely that this was his motivation upon leaving Icarus through the gate; but maybe now that he's on Destiny.... I mean, he knows an awful lot about the Ancients and obviously has a great deal of reverence for their abilities. Maybe he's hoping he'll find a way to 'turn back time', as it were, and get his wife back?
It maybe a little bit like Annorax in ST: VOY as well (i.e. "Year of Hell")....

not sure I can see that. He would have to figure out how to go back in time on the Destiny AND find a way to get back to Earth to the time before his wife got sick (maybe with a cure he found as well like a way to eliminate her the gene that caused her cancer)

If he wanted to go back in time so badly couldn't he just use one of those puddle jumpers that SG1 used? (does the SGC still have them?)

Commander Zelix
April 24th, 2010, 09:18 AM
Mhmm, you're right, he does. But I always wondered: ascension to what end? He just doesn't strike me as the Daniel type, to want ascension out of a desire for wisdom... Perhaps he thinks he can find a way to get his wife back that way?
It's what I always thought. But I find that surprising that this didn't come up in his guilt trip in Human. "I'm doing this for you" didn't come up.

erotavlas
April 24th, 2010, 09:18 AM
I always thought he was in for his wife. Now I'm not sure. But Rush has been very clear in Time:

RUSH: Of course, the Ancients evolved to a point where their physical bodies were no longer necessary, found a way for consciousness to become immortal.

WALLACE: D'you really think that's possible?

RUSH (determinedly): I know it is.

(He pauses for a moment, then smiles awkwardly at Eli.)

RUSH: Maybe not for you and me, but that idea - it's the reason why I ended up here.

WALLACE (hesitantly): So, you think if we learn enough, that-that somehow, somewhere out there, we could discover how it's done?

(Rush doesn't answer for a long time but finally half turns towards Eli.)

RUSH: We have to make it through the day.


He clearly says its probably not possible for Wallace and himself to achieve it. Even Daniel couldn't ascend on his own, he needed help. And there's no one there to help Rush ascend.

...but what if that smile toward Eli (while he was talking to Wallace) meant he thinks Eli could achieve it???

TheRandomOne
April 24th, 2010, 09:38 AM
He clearly says its probably not possible for Wallace and himself to achieve it. Even Daniel couldn't ascend on his own, he needed help. And there's no one there to help Rush ascend.

...but what if that smile toward Eli (while he was talking to Wallace) meant he thinks Eli could achieve it???

Rodney of all people did could have Ascended if he wanted to at one point. Didn't Atlantis figure out how to do it ?

Specter177
April 24th, 2010, 09:51 AM
He clearly says its probably not possible for Wallace and himself to achieve it. Even Daniel couldn't ascend on his own, he needed help. And there's no one there to help Rush ascend.

...but what if that smile toward Eli (while he was talking to Wallace) meant he thinks Eli could achieve it???

You do know that Eli is Wallace, right?

Kaiphantom
April 24th, 2010, 09:54 AM
Rodney of all people did could have Ascended if he wanted to at one point. Didn't Atlantis figure out how to do it ?

That was because of a machine that was changing him *physically*. Our bodies haven't evolved physically enough to do ascension normally; we need help. Perhaps Rush thinks that, Destiny is a good stepping stone toward that goal, since it comes from a point where the Ancients were still more advanced than us, but not enough for ascension, either.

As for my take, Rush is just after knowledge. Studying the 9th chevron, his life's work, cost him being there for his wife's passing. He wants to make his work count for something know, he's desperate. But he doesn't want anyone else getting close, because he doesn't want to risk losing them like his wife. And he probably holds out some small hope he can figure out ascension, to leave the cares of physical mortals behind.

jelgate
April 24th, 2010, 09:55 AM
To learn all about the Destiny he can. Its what he did instead of being with his dying wife. Since she is dead I think his work is all Rush has left

erotavlas
April 24th, 2010, 10:19 AM
You do know that Eli is Wallace, right?

WHAT! Wallace? All this time I thought Wallace was the other tech guy....:mad:

Fridgefiend
April 24th, 2010, 10:29 AM
WHAT! Wallace? All this time I thought Wallace was the other tech guy....:mad:

haha nope Wallace is Eli's last name. I don't even think any other tech guys were on that planet. Maybe brody

Commander Zelix
April 24th, 2010, 10:56 AM
LOL at the Wallace thing. We don't get to hear his last name very often. As in "Mr. Wallace here thinks..." Sounds odd.

Volker was also there on the planet. First to exhibit symptoms of the illness I think.

Lahela
April 24th, 2010, 10:59 AM
To learn all about the Destiny he can. Its what he did instead of being with his dying wife. Since she is dead I think his work is all Rush has left

I think it's a bit more than that - he wasn't there for her at the end because the work was so important, so now she's dead if he doesn't see it through then it will have been meaningless. IIRC, she says something along those lines in Human.

jelgate
April 24th, 2010, 11:12 AM
I think it's a bit more than that - he wasn't there for her at the end because the work was so important, so now she's dead if he doesn't see it through then it will have been meaningless. IIRC, she says something along those lines in Human.

I pretty much said that just not so explained:P

Lahela
April 24th, 2010, 11:16 AM
I pretty much said that just not so explained:P

Fair enough :)

flipper_gv
April 24th, 2010, 12:37 PM
If he wasn't there when his wife died because he was working on the Icarus project, maybe he told to himself that that project had to end up worthy enough to excuse the fact he wasn't there. If the the planet exploded and he accepted the fact that the project wasn't going to happen, that'd mean he wasn't there when his wife died for absolutely nothing. That's a good reason to me to explain how he is acting generally.

Commander Zelix
April 24th, 2010, 12:44 PM
If he wasn't there when his wife died because he was working on the Icarus project, maybe he told to himself that that project had to end up worthy enough to excuse the fact he wasn't there. If the the planet exploded and he accepted the fact that the project wasn't going to happen, that'd mean he wasn't there when his wife died for absolutely nothing. That's a good reason to me to explain how he is acting generally.
Not to me. I really hope there's more to it. But since he mentioned ascension to be the reason why he is there. There's probably more to it.

Blackhole
April 24th, 2010, 02:34 PM
I don't think he is really after anything. After his wife's death he became obsessed with his work which was connecting with the 9th chevron. It is probably all that gave his life meaning. When the base was attacked he realized this may be his last chance to do so, so he did without regard to the consequences to everyone else. His action is part of the whole callousness thing Human referred to.

Blistna
April 24th, 2010, 03:00 PM
Bravo, i agree. :D

meo3000
April 24th, 2010, 03:43 PM
The only way Rush can save his wife is by ascending, going back in time, then curing his wife mother genetic disorder. Using a time machine just brings him back, it doesnt cure her.

Hes a man with a plan and he showed us hes ready to go at great lengths to make sure he succeeds. He knows the power an ascended being can have, and only one regret in his life to try to fix.

garhkal
April 24th, 2010, 03:45 PM
Does anyone else think it's plausible that Rush has a motivation similar to Malakai from "Window of Opportunity"? Perhaps it seems unlikely that this was his motivation upon leaving Icarus through the gate; but maybe now that he's on Destiny.... I mean, he knows an awful lot about the Ancients and obviously has a great deal of reverence for their abilities. Maybe he's hoping he'll find a way to 'turn back time', as it were, and get his wife back?
It maybe a little bit like Annorax in ST: VOY as well (i.e. "Year of Hell")....

Good cal back to SG1. While i do see him as that type of scientist, we hve seen from many other TT eps where things like that can go back.


Perhaps he thinks he can find a way to get his wife back that way?

Maybe he feels if he IS ascended he could go back and save her.. but then that would force the others to decend him.

Blackhole
April 24th, 2010, 03:49 PM
The only way Rush can save his wife is by ascending, going back in time, then curing his wife mother genetic disorder. Using a time machine just brings him back, it doesnt cure her.

Hes a man with a plan and he showed us hes ready to go at great lengths to make sure he succeeds. He knows the power an ascended being can have, and only one regret in his life to try to fix.

Rush would also know that ascended beings have very strict rules about interfering in human affairs particularly personal ones. I understand your assertion I just don't think it is his plan to do so.

garhkal
April 25th, 2010, 03:40 PM
Perhaps he feels knowing their 'rules' and therefore decending him when he DOES interfere is a suitable pennance for helping out his wife, due to him ignoring her when she needed it most.

The Shrike
April 25th, 2010, 06:54 PM
Rush believes the end justifies the means, therefore I agree that his goal is to uncover the secrets of ascension, then to ascend himself with the ultimate goal of bringing back his wife, consequences be damned. I wouldn't even be surprised if he ignored his wife on her death bed because her cancer was incureable, and every second he spent with her represented another second he would be further away from the one thing that had the power to change that reality...an ascended being.

I don't think he'll succeed in the end, but I'll bet he gives the ancients fits trying.

pipi
April 26th, 2010, 03:44 AM
Perhaps he feels knowing their 'rules' and therefore decending him when he DOES interfere is a suitable pennance for helping out his wife, due to him ignoring her when she needed it most.

My understanding of how the ascention rules work is that it only applies if you were guided to ascention by another Ancient in their collective group. Cause these rules don't apply in the Ori galaxy and there could very well be physical limits as to the reach of the Ancient's influence or power. Destiny being dozens of galaxies away could be out of reach of the Ancient's rules. And if you self ascend yourself in your own way, I don't think they will mess with you. There are bound to be other self-ascended beings that are not Ancients, it'd be a bold statement to say the Ancients hold a monopoly or dictatorship over the ascended spacetime.

If Rush seeks ascention solely to help his wife, he needs psychiatric help and attend sensitivity training.

ladypredator
April 26th, 2010, 03:48 PM
...Rush has been very clear in Time:

RUSH: Of course, the Ancients evolved to a point where their physical bodies were no longer necessary, found a way for consciousness to become immortal.
WALLACE: D'you really think that's possible?
RUSH (determinedly): I know it is.
(He pauses for a moment, then smiles awkwardly at Eli.)
RUSH: Maybe not for you and me, but that idea - it's the reason why I ended up here.
WALLACE (hesitantly): So, you think if we learn enough, that-that somehow, somewhere out there, we could discover how it's done?
(Rush doesn't answer for a long time but finally half turns towards Eli.)
RUSH: We have to make it through the day.

Rush's motivation to work on the Icarus Project was clearly to find out how the Ancients ascended so that he could save his wife. It was the only way he could keep Gloria from dying, so he threw himself into his work (and yes, he probably also did it because he couldn't emotionally deal with watching her die, that's not an uncommon reaction). But it was to save her.

Then she dies before he can solve the Ninth Chevron (and he was with her when she died, he says that he was there in the final scene with her in "Human" - he's there in his memory/dreamscape because he was there when it really happened).

After that, I think he's so devastated by failing to solve the project in time to save her, that he feels like he HAS to finish it now. It's all he has left. As he says, the man that he was died with her. He feels like he's lost everything except the work, so he buries his grief into an obsessive need to complete the project. To gain the knowledge he was searching for. That's his motivation. It's why he took the last chance he had to get to Destiny and it's why he has no desire to return to Earth. There's nothing but painful memories left for him on Earth, why would he want to return?

I think that he's just slowly starting to heal. The trauma of the alien abduction and the connection that he forms with Chloe in the aftermath is really important. Chloe is the first person since Gloria's death that he forms an emotional connection with and that is the first break in the shell he's put around himself. Chloe needed him and he responded to her with gentleness and kindness - you see that in how they interact in "Divided." She wouldn't be that loyal if he hadn't been really good to her.

My feeling is that he needed to have that conversation with Gloria, even if it was only his memory of Gloria, about not letting her death shut him off from people. He needed to hear from her in some way that it's OK for him to start making connections to people again. Sure, it's only a 'dreamscape' version of her, but he must know that she'd feel that way. They loved each other a lot - and I think he finally manages to say goodbye to her at the end of "Human." He's finally able to say how much he loved her and how much he misses her and how he'll never forget her, but also start to accept that he can begin to let other people into his life again.

Healing from severe grief is a long process and a painful one. I hope they continue to let him heal - it would be a wonderful journey to see the character of Rush go on.

pipi
April 26th, 2010, 06:11 PM
Even if Rush genuinely loves his wife the fact that he didn't even bother to give the dream version of her a hug, kiss or say nice things to her which would have taken only a fraction of his busy dream life, tells me that they were not very intimate. He would be a better man if he learns to show emotions, and I'd hope finding a woman to marry would teach him some life lessons. Beauty and the Beast. He is still a Beast. Some people never change.

JustAnotherVoice
April 27th, 2010, 05:00 AM
Even if Rush genuinely loves his wife the fact that he didn't even bother to give the dream version of her a hug, kiss or say nice things to her which would have taken only a fraction of his busy dream life, tells me that they were not very intimate. He would be a better man if he learns to show emotions, and I'd hope finding a woman to marry would teach him some life lessons. Beauty and the Beast. He is still a Beast. Some people never change.

The whole dream sequence shows us a VERY self loathing version of Rush. He's already shown us (Air) how much difficulty he has dealing with her death, and in this episode, he explained to us that he actively avoided her last few days alive. Can you really blame Rush for ignoring her in the dream sequence, simply because he chose to remember her in her prime, rather than as a pale shadow of what she once was?

Having genuine affection for his wife is not mutually exclusive from having genuine hatred for cowering from the situation and the guilt of leaving her to die alone, and that self loathing is a VERY powerful motivator to stay the hell away from his dream sequence wife. Every time he looked at her (in his dream), he was probably hating himself that much more, feeling the emptiness in his life that much more, and knowing that he can never change what happened all the more painfully.

If you are more stoic when facing the slow, torturous death of a loved one, good for you, but not all of us are made from the same stuff, so don't judge the man too harshly.

FallenAngelII
April 27th, 2010, 06:30 AM
Rush's motivation is to never return home. He doesn't want Destiny going back to Earth, he wants it all for himself. He'd do anything to stay on the ship, and he'd do even more to make sure he can do whatever he wants on the ship.
Xerox of the standard anti-Rush post.

Pray tell, do you have any actual, you know, evidence to prove that this is his main motivation? I mean, the "He doesn't want to go home"-thing at least has some credence seeing as how the characters on the show have themselves speculated this.

But that he wants to hog Destiny for himself? Where is this coming from?!

carmencatalina
April 27th, 2010, 07:29 AM
Even if Rush genuinely loves his wife the fact that he didn't even bother to give the dream version of her a hug, kiss or say nice things to her

I've thought about this - what if you were given a "dream" that you knew was a dream, and there was someone you loved and lost, and you knew it wasn't really them? I'm not sure how I would react - but it would be torture, you know? It isn't really them, just your imagining of them. It is actually rather a cruel thing. And how is kissing or hugging what you know is only a manufactured image of the person that you know is dead going to help anything?

Again, I don't know what I would do.

wargrafix
April 27th, 2010, 07:55 AM
he wants to tap him some chloe.

Sami_
April 27th, 2010, 08:15 AM
So we see that Rush was working hard on the 9th chevron project while his wife was dying. He never really spent enough time with her in the end. It seems to me like he doesn't want all that work he did while his wife was dying to be in vain. Like he has to follow through with the mission at all costs otherwise neglecting his wife all that time would have been for nothing.

I think you hit the nail on the head, nothing short of a world/galaxy changing discovery will satisfy Rush now in my opinion.

Lord Hurin
April 27th, 2010, 08:54 AM
But that he wants to hog Destiny for himself? Where is this coming from?!

Agreed. I think he wants to unlock its' secrets, sure. He can't do it alone though, even he knows that.

As far as the character goes, some people came away from this episode thinking "the ******! he wasn't with her near enough!" and despising Rush more. I'm the opposite; now we have a reason for him being a broken, miserable man. My hope now is that he's starting to get past it and won't be like this to such a degree as the show goes on.

Merlin's_Legacy
April 27th, 2010, 09:31 AM
Having been in a situation similar to Rush's and watching someone very close to me die by inches, in terrible pain the whole time, I think I now have a better understanding of Rush's actions in the series so far.

Granted it's a bit hard to filter the "real" events from the "changed" events in the dream, but I got the impression that Rush dearly loved his wife and felt like she was really the better part of him. Gloria's mother apparently died of cancer so he had already seen her in pain and how it affected her. He dealt with his emotion the only way he knew how: By immersing himself in the Icarus project. Rush promised Gloria that he would be there for her when she passed, but he broke that promise. He was actually on Icarus when she died.

That guilt can be crushing, and coupled with losing someone so close they're like a part of you, you don't come through that unchanged. On top of the pain and guilt the absolute fact of your own mortality comes crashing down on you. You start looking for something, anything, that can give your life meaning. Some way to leave your mark on history or improve mankind. I know in my own case, I spent a good deal of time walking back and forth across the line that separates sanity and insanity. Anybody within reach becomes a target for your frustration...

Now throw into this mix that Rush has been given knowledge of Ascension and that Ascended beings can make their own reality. If you're already irrational and have stopped listening to your conscience then you run headlong toward any promise of happiness and stability, or even of just something different.

Rush is running from himself and from his pain while at the same time desperately searching for meaning and potential happiness.

I didn't particularly like Rush in the beginning, but I understand him better after this episode and can't help but forgive him since I see pieces of myself in him.

pipi
April 28th, 2010, 12:41 AM
he wants to tap him some chloe.

u sick lil bish. :)

EllieVee
April 28th, 2010, 03:28 AM
Even if Rush genuinely loves his wife the fact that he didn't even bother to give the dream version of her a hug, kiss or say nice things to her which would have taken only a fraction of his busy dream life, tells me that they were not very intimate. He would be a better man if he learns to show emotions, and I'd hope finding a woman to marry would teach him some life lessons. Beauty and the Beast. He is still a Beast. Some people never change.

Except he knew it was a dream. I think what people have to remember is in the conversations he has in Human, he's essentially talking to himself. Gloria doesn't say he's callous, he's telling himself he's been callous. He says to Jackson at the beginning he doesn't want to go through it again (or words to that effect). It's very clear that he loved her very much.


Having been in a situation similar to Rush's and watching someone very close to me die by inches, in terrible pain the whole time, I think I now have a better understanding of Rush's actions in the series so far.

Granted it's a bit hard to filter the "real" events from the "changed" events in the dream, but I got the impression that Rush dearly loved his wife and felt like she was really the better part of him. Gloria's mother apparently died of cancer so he had already seen her in pain and how it affected her. He dealt with his emotion the only way he knew how: By immersing himself in the Icarus project. Rush promised Gloria that he would be there for her when she passed, but he broke that promise. He was actually on Icarus when she died.

He says he was there when she died. What do you have that's different to that?

SG7
April 28th, 2010, 04:46 AM
I see it as Rush trying to escape from the reality of the situation. He threw himself into his work during the final months of his wife's life as a method of "coping" with his loss by not dealing with it - he quite literally left his problems several million miles (light years?) behind. The survivor's guilt that has been plaguing him turned him into the bitter, angry, self loathing man we knew until this episode, and now that he's (apparently) finally had a cathartic experience, maybe we can see who the real Nicholas Rush is.

We saw in the episode where his wife says "It's back". Basically saying that they have been around that bend once before. And perhaps he was having to deal with going through that a second time with his wife, and being reminded for a second time that he is powerless to be able to do anything for her. Much like on Destiny in their current state. Right now they are powerless to be able to get back home. He must struggle with the fact that he wants to remain on Destiny however has no control over the ship.

Merlin's_Legacy
April 29th, 2010, 10:01 AM
He says he was there when she died. What do you have that's different to that?

I misinterpreted the final hospital scene and missed the "I was here" part. I thought that Rush was trying to make up for not being there. Trying to maybe change his memory of events. It came from the "I've already been through this", "No you haven't" comments. (Which I guess in a way says that even though Rush was there with Gloria when she died, he really wasn't there. Another sentiment that I can totally understand.)

Girlbot
April 29th, 2010, 10:52 AM
I think he wants Life the Universe and Everything, and 46 is his 42, He won't be satisfied till he gets to control the Destiny and know all of it's secrets.

Nataku27
April 29th, 2010, 12:42 PM
Rush is looking for answers , why did gloria have to die whereas he was not there, what are the secrets of Destiny, he's in for a very very long quest for Knowledge.

kansaikimono
April 29th, 2010, 08:46 PM
You have to remember that some people aren't very good at showing emotions, especially if they've grown up in a family in which they've been told that showing emotion is a sign of weakness, especially for boys - stiff upper lip and all that.

Rush's Machiavellian approach to life didn't just happen overnight. It's probably a process he developed as a means of emotional self-defense. Purge the subjective; focus on the objective. He loves Gloria, but Gloria is dying. What can he do to prevent her death? Nothing, so he buries himself in the one thing that he can focus on with reasonably positive results: his work on the Icarus project. Gloria recognizes this and at the dinner table "gives her permission" so to speak for him to go on with his work.

Also, the images we're seeing aren't necessarily the way it really happened. My impression is that Rush did spend time with his wife (going for walks, sitting in the park), but maybe not as much as he knows he should have. In the dream sequence, he foregoes the chit chat and hand holding because doing so would be ineffective, a waste of time, a distraction that would take him away from his whole purpose for being there, which is to discover the code for unlocking Destiny. He tells Jackson this when he reiterates that everything around him isn't real.

What is Rush after? Access to Destiny. What wonders of the universe does she have to share with him? I think when Jackson first approached him about joining the Icarus project, it was the challenge of breaking the code that appealed to him. To have Eli do it instead hurt his professional pride. I'm amazed that he's as nice to Eli as he is.

Now that the mystery of the ninth chevron has been broken, his new purpose in life is to explore Destiny and the first step is finding the key to opening her. He seems to have a symbiotic relationship with her. When the refugees arrived aboard Destiny, he was the first to touch her consoles. Since then, it's almost as though she's aware of what he needs and wants. Did she know he'd been captured by the aliens? Did she deliberately drop out of FTL so he could be found and rescued? Quite the coincidence, isn't it? And rather a curiousity that, through the chair, she chooses to access the part of his brain that holds the memories of his wife and troubles his heart.

As for Rush's relationship with Chloe, yes, he is quite gentle with her, moreso now that they've had a shared, traumatic experience as captives. However, from the beginning he has been softer with the women on board. Recall the scenes with TJ when she's at his bedside after his collapse, with Chloe after her father's death, with Ming Na's character when he asks for more control of his science team, and with Park when he first groups her with Brody and Walker. Sure, they're manipulative at times, but his approach with females is far less antagonistic than when he's dealing with Young, Greer, or even Volker.

MIZA
April 30th, 2010, 12:26 AM
i am pretty sure he has his own agenda , and that he does not care who he has to go threw to get it , even if it mean other peoples lives

Blackhole
April 30th, 2010, 03:00 AM
You have to remember that some people aren't very good at showing emotions, especially if they've grown up in a family in which they've been told that showing emotion is a sign of weakness, especially for boys - stiff upper lip and all that.

Rush's Machiavellian approach to life didn't just happen overnight. It's probably a process he developed as a means of emotional self-defense. Purge the subjective; focus on the objective. He loves Gloria, but Gloria is dying. What can he do to prevent her death? Nothing, so he buries himself in the one thing that he can focus on with reasonably positive results: his work on the Icarus project. Gloria recognizes this and at the dinner table "gives her permission" so to speak for him to go on with his work.

Also, the images we're seeing aren't necessarily the way it really happened. My impression is that Rush did spend time with his wife (going for walks, sitting in the park), but maybe not as much as he knows he should have. In the dream sequence, he foregoes the chit chat and hand holding because doing so would be ineffective, a waste of time, a distraction that would take him away from his whole purpose for being there, which is to discover the code for unlocking Destiny. He tells Jackson this when he reiterates that everything around him isn't real.

What is Rush after? Access to Destiny. What wonders of the universe does she have to share with him? I think when Jackson first approached him about joining the Icarus project, it was the challenge of breaking the code that appealed to him. To have Eli do it instead hurt his professional pride. I'm amazed that he's as nice to Eli as he is.

Now that the mystery of the ninth chevron has been broken, his new purpose in life is to explore Destiny and the first step is finding the key to opening her. He seems to have a symbiotic relationship with her. When the refugees arrived aboard Destiny, he was the first to touch her consoles. Since then, it's almost as though she's aware of what he needs and wants. Did she know he'd been captured by the aliens? Did she deliberately drop out of FTL so he could be found and rescued? Quite the coincidence, isn't it? And rather a curiousity that, through the chair, she chooses to access the part of his brain that holds the memories of his wife and troubles his heart.

As for Rush's relationship with Chloe, yes, he is quite gentle with her, moreso now that they've had a shared, traumatic experience as captives. However, from the beginning he has been softer with the women on board. Recall the scenes with TJ when she's at his bedside after his collapse, with Chloe after her father's death, with Ming Na's character when he asks for more control of his science team, and with Park when he first groups her with Brody and Walker. Sure, they're manipulative at times, but his approach with females is far less antagonistic than when he's dealing with Young, Greer, or even Volker.

Interesting idea that the ship may have a personal connection to Rush. From the ship's perspective it has been waiting a long time for Destiny's crew to input the master code sequence. The delay could also tend to suggest to "her" that they are interlopers. Or maybe since the ship has waited for ages for a crew to return she is lonely and has given him a hint to the code so Rush would be able to communicate directly with her. It would make for an interesting plot line for Destiny to be a semi-sentient ship.

garhkal
April 30th, 2010, 11:01 PM
And with a female mentality as well.. Who'da thunk it. Rush has a ship with a crush on him!

Sami_
May 2nd, 2010, 03:12 PM
Except he knew it was a dream. I think what people have to remember is in the conversations he has in Human, he's essentially talking to himself. Gloria doesn't say he's callous, he's telling himself he's been callous. He says to Jackson at the beginning he doesn't want to go through it again (or words to that effect). It's very clear that he loved her very much.

Most definetly this for sure.

If the lighting wasn't so crappy in Human we would have been able to see the expression on Rushs' face when he holds his wifes hand when they are having a meal, its bearly viewable but you can see just enough to know that he is very emotional at that point.

Bearing in mind that he knew it wasn't real I think it only goes to prove how much he cares for her and has a lot of regret.

EllieVee
May 3rd, 2010, 02:01 AM
Most definetly this for sure.

If the lighting wasn't so crappy in Human we would have been able to see the expression on Rushs' face when he holds his wifes hand when they are having a meal, its bearly viewable but you can see just enough to know that he is very emotional at that point.

Bearing in mind that he knew it wasn't real I think it only goes to prove how much he cares for her and has a lot of regret.

I actually thought the lighting added rather than detracted but I was able to see his face. I suppose it depends on what you're viewing it on.

Ben 'Teal'c would WIN!!' Noble
May 5th, 2010, 10:57 AM
Agreed. I think he wants to unlock its' secrets, sure. He can't do it alone though, even he knows that.

As far as the character goes, some people came away from this episode thinking "the ******! he wasn't with her near enough!" and despising Rush more. I'm the opposite; now we have a reason for him being a broken, miserable man. My hope now is that he's starting to get past it and won't be like this to such a degree as the show goes on.

Yes, this is my thinking as well. I've been a supporter of Young but I found his reaction after Rush got out of the chair to be overly suspicious, I was like bloody hell mate he nearly died and didn't even know about the team stuck off world. If Young had seen dreamscape he proberly would have more sympathy for him.

Screw Young go Rush :P.

EllieVee
May 5th, 2010, 06:34 PM
Yes, this is my thinking as well. I've been a supporter of Young but I found his reaction after Rush got out of the chair to be overly suspicious, I was like bloody hell mate he nearly died and didn't even know about the team stuck off world. If Young had seen dreamscape he proberly would have more sympathy for him.

Screw Young go Rush :P.

Young was pretty vile all the way through the episode.

garhkal
May 8th, 2010, 04:23 AM
With the events in tonights ep as he is talking to that scientist lass it makes his delve back in to the past more painful and therefore more powerful.