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Adrian_Jackson
October 3rd, 2009, 04:56 PM
Why was everyone falling through? Is it because the ramp-gate elevation at Icarus Base was different than the floor-gate elevation on the Destiny?

Confessor Rahl
October 3rd, 2009, 04:57 PM
...Because they were told to give a three count before each person enters, but all decided to run blindly in a huge herd, all at once? Come on, seriously.

s09119
October 3rd, 2009, 05:03 PM
Why was everyone falling through? Is it because the ramp-gate elevation at Icarus Base was different than the floor-gate elevation on the Destiny?

Probably because the Destiny gate hasn't been updated for stellar drift in several million years. Wasn't that what caused people to be thrown out of the gate in the early days of the Stargate Program, until Carter adjusted the one in SGC to compensate for it?

Coronach
October 3rd, 2009, 05:04 PM
Part of me wonders if it might have to do with jumping such a vast distance. We've never done that before, and it's definitely the case that this could just be an (as of yet) unexplained aspect of long-distance gate travel.

I don't remember off-hand, but didn't something similar happen to O'Neill when he traveled to the Ida galaxy when the 8th chevron was used for the first time?

Confessor Rahl
October 3rd, 2009, 05:06 PM
Probably because the Destiny gate hasn't been updated for stellar drift in several million years. Wasn't that what caused people to be thrown out of the gate in the early days of the Stargate Program, until Carter adjusted the one in SGC to compensate for it?

This also makes sense, all of the gate addresses in that system were updated with her program, so no matter how many gates they visted they were all accounted for.

OhForCryinOutLoud
October 3rd, 2009, 05:07 PM
[QUOTE=Coronach;10666791]Part of me wonders if it might have to do with jumping such a vast distance. We've never done that before, and it's definitely the case that this could just be an (as of yet) unexplained aspect of long-distance gate travel.QUOTE]

I agree - I figured it was just because it was the first time for a 9 chevron trip. I was watching with someone who had never watched any Stargate eps before, and her reaction was - "Wow, I've never seen characters introduced like this before!"

Adrian_Jackson
October 3rd, 2009, 05:14 PM
...Because they were told to give a three count before each person enters, but all decided to run blindly in a huge herd, all at once? Come on, seriously.

Lt. Scott was the first one to calmly mosey on through with no interference from people following him and he fell on his ass after exiting the wormhole. Come on, seriously.

Confessor Rahl
October 3rd, 2009, 05:23 PM
Lt. Scott was the first one to calmly mosey on through with no interference from people following him and he fell on his ass after exiting the wormhole. Come on, seriously.

Seriously dude, I mean, come on!

No, you're totally right, I should have thought about it a bit more, so look up a few posts and you'll see I agree with the Carter theory.

TheChronoTrigger
October 3rd, 2009, 05:24 PM
Maybe it had something to do with the unstable power source of the planets core? We've seen previous instances where power fluctuations cause various issues.

Pianomancuber
October 3rd, 2009, 05:26 PM
Yeah, I think it's a combination of the ramp elevation being different, the destiny gate being ridiculously old and unused, and the long distance. There are several interesting ways it could be explained.

What I didn't quite get is why boxes were flying through in the beginning. During the flashback, nobody was throwing them through the gate.

aarlin81
October 3rd, 2009, 05:39 PM
This also makes sense, all of the gate addresses in that system were updated with her program, so no matter how many gates they visted they were all accounted for.

The other gates haves DHDs. All the gates within a network update periodically when connected to a DHD. The SGC uses a "dialing computer" that must simulate a DHD.

Confessor Rahl
October 3rd, 2009, 06:00 PM
The other gates haves DHDs. All the gates within a network update periodically when connected to a DHD. The SGC uses a "dialing computer" that must simulate a DHD.

And this gate they connected to couldn't have been worked into the program because by its nature it is constantly on the move in a way that, unlike stellar drift, isn't predictable? Am I understanding her program correctly? Never been HUGE on the tech, even though it interests me.

Adrian_Jackson
October 3rd, 2009, 06:23 PM
Yeah, I think it's a combination of the ramp elevation being different, the destiny gate being ridiculously old and unused, and the long distance. There are several interesting ways it could be explained.

What I didn't quite get is why boxes were flying through in the beginning. During the flashback, nobody was throwing them through the gate.

Maybe power fluctuations caused the objects people were carrying to be transmitted separately and at different times?

Quadhelix
October 3rd, 2009, 06:29 PM
And this gate they connected to couldn't have been worked into the program because by its nature it is constantly on the move in a way that, unlike stellar drift, isn't predictable? Am I understanding her program correctly?It would seem that establishing a connection between Stargates is not a hit-or-miss affair: if your Stargate is poorly aligned, then it is possible to "almost miss"; you still establish a connection, but the ride is a little bumpier, etc.

This is what was happening in early SG-1 when they were being thrown from the 'Gate: the destination wasn't where the Stargate thought it should be, so its aim was off and the connection was poor.

Now, the farther the distance, the more accurate your aim has to be. Going across the galaxy (~100,000 light-years), an error of 1/10,000 of a degree will put you roughly 0.2 light-years off course; not exactly small, but still in the correct solar system. Going from Milky Way to Pegasus (3 million light-years), this same error of 1/10,000 of a degree will put you about 5 light-years off course; still not small, but probably enough to put you at the right 'Gate address.

However, at a billion light-years, this 1/10,000 of a degree error inflates to put you roughly 2,000 light years off course.

It is possible that the Stargate has some maximum accuracy that it is physically incapable of exceeding. It seems almost certain that if that is the case, it would be much, much smaller than 1/10,000 of a degree. Nevertheless, if any such limit existed, it would cause any wormhole connected to the Destiny from the Milky Way to be off course, just like the wormholes in early SG-1, which were off course be case the 'Gate addresses were wrong.

tNsRAoL
October 3rd, 2009, 06:34 PM
It could also be the core was unstable and power fluctuations had a factor in it as well. We have seen in previously that when the power fluctuates people are thrown out of the gate.

zbegra
October 3rd, 2009, 06:34 PM
Sounds like the gate system has the same problem as computer networks do. Lag. Interstellar Lag :). Try playing a video-game with bad latency, you see players flying all over! hehe

Confessor Rahl
October 3rd, 2009, 06:35 PM
Wow I found that above post to be very informing, thanks for that! :)

Captain Obvious
October 3rd, 2009, 07:51 PM
Probably because the Destiny gate hasn't been updated for stellar drift in several million years. Wasn't that what caused people to be thrown out of the gate in the early days of the Stargate Program, until Carter adjusted the one in SGC to compensate for it?

And initially you were rematerialized with a core body temp in the 60's if I remember from the movie correctly.

They are lucky that they weren't Popsicles. that and that the life support had not turned off and left the place at absolute zero.

Jedted
October 3rd, 2009, 08:05 PM
My first assumtion was that it was because the Destiny is constantly moving so if the front end of the gate was facing aft then when the came out of the wormhole they would be thrown back.

That's just my geuss though. :)

Joshuwa
October 3rd, 2009, 10:59 PM
From Brian J. Smith
http://twitter.com/BrianJacobSmith

@MajorSamFan because the 9th chevron address is VERY far away - so the wormhole is especially strong due to the energy requirements.


@MajorSamFan not when you're traveling several billion light years from the point of origin. It's much more intense.

RepliVeggie
October 4th, 2009, 12:16 AM
The Ancients probably would have dialed the gate and sent a command for the ship to stop. And then make the calculations necessary for smooth travel.

JackHarkness_Hot
October 4th, 2009, 12:31 AM
My first assumtion was that it was because the Destiny is constantly moving so if the front end of the gate was facing aft then when the came out of the wormhole they would be thrown back.

That's just my geuss though. :)At one time I did thought that but in the episode, it wasn't until the gate shut down that they went into FTL mode. Hmm.. I wonder, if it means that everytime there is an incoming wormhole, the ship automatically drops out of FTL.

I hate thinking cos on Atlantis we established that the gate needs to be relatively stationary to work, travel a lil too fast and it doesn't work, if Destiny was in FTL mode initially, how did Rush establish a lock in the first place?

Quadhelix
October 4th, 2009, 05:46 AM
They are lucky that they weren't Popsicles. that and that the life support had not turned off and left the place at absolute zero. That isn't entirely accurate: if the thermal regulation component of the life support system had failed, then the waste heat from whatever power supply the Destiny used would have raised the ship's internal temperature into the hundreds or thousands of degrees.





I hate thinking cos on Atlantis we established that the gate needs to be relatively stationary to work, travel a lil too fast and it doesn't work, if Destiny was in FTL mode initially, how did Rush establish a lock in the first place? Well, we don't know which part requires the Stargate to be stationary: if it's just for establishing the wormhole, the Destiny could have detected that someone was trying to establish a connection and dropped out of hyperspace to allow the wormhole to form.

Egle01
October 4th, 2009, 06:58 AM
Remember what happened in "Solitudes". The gate got more energy and that caused the wormhole to jump bla bla bla. Daniel and Teal'c flew to the ramp. IIRC, more badly that survivors aboard the Destiny.

Starsaber
October 4th, 2009, 07:39 AM
That isn't entirely accurate: if the thermal regulation component of the life support system had failed, then the waste heat from whatever power supply the Destiny used would have raised the ship's internal temperature into the hundreds or thousands of degrees.



Well, we don't know which part requires the Stargate to be stationary: if it's just for establishing the wormhole, the Destiny could have detected that someone was trying to establish a connection and dropped out of hyperspace to allow the wormhole to form.

And for that matter, when it detected the inbound wormhole, it could have activated life support. There were a few minutes between the connection being made and Scott going through, so that could explain it (to a point)

HPMom
October 4th, 2009, 07:45 AM
...Because they were told to give a three count before each person enters, but all decided to run blindly in a huge herd, all at once? Come on, seriously.

When they later showed them going through from the side of origin it was much more orderly than it showed on the other side until maybe the very end.

s09119
October 4th, 2009, 08:57 AM
At one time I did thought that but in the episode, it wasn't until the gate shut down that they went into FTL mode. Hmm.. I wonder, if it means that everytime there is an incoming wormhole, the ship automatically drops out of FTL.

I hate thinking cos on Atlantis we established that the gate needs to be relatively stationary to work, travel a lil too fast and it doesn't work, if Destiny was in FTL mode initially, how did Rush establish a lock in the first place?

Remember, we see the ship drop out of FTL before the wormhole is established in the very beginning of "Air, Part 1." It may have some sort of sensor that detects when someone is trying to dial into its gate, prompting an immediate reversion to sublight.

EternalAlteran
October 4th, 2009, 11:43 AM
It was weird, and probably done as a dramatic act. Only when the last person, I believe it was Young, came through it maked sense, because he was blasted though the gate by the exploding base.

Eternal Density
October 4th, 2009, 09:15 PM
I bet the power fluctuations over such a distance would have caused wormhole fluctuations such that individual travelers didn't necessarily arrive with the same relative timing and position (and of course momentum) to what they had on leaving. So they could have got bunched up, had their luggage separated from them, etc. Just a theory.

VSS
October 5th, 2009, 08:57 AM
It was weird, and probably done as a dramatic act. Only when the last person, I believe it was Young, came through it maked sense, because he was blasted though the gate by the exploding base.

I think this is probably right, although reading the above explanations is helpful. The thing is, they weren't just tumbling, they were almost ejected- enough to break someone's arm and almost kill Young (though he had the additional velocity from the explosion). I was hoping one of the characters would offer an explanation, but given the circumstances, scientific theorizing probably wasn't really high on their list of things to do!

prion
October 7th, 2009, 09:40 AM
Didn't make any sense. We saw people walking, albeit a bit quickly, through the gate. No one was running. This was not a stampede in a burning nightclub nor a rush for stadium seating.

I think it was done purely for a dramatic entrance. If they use the gate again and come through being flung, then well, there's a software error somewhere, but otherwise, drama, angst, let's have people getting banged up and wailing and sorta panicked.

The thing is that we as fans should not have to ask the writers 'what gives?' although I think I'll just toodle on over to Mallozzi's blog and ask just that...

Captain Obvious
October 7th, 2009, 09:45 AM
Didn't make any sense. We saw people walking, albeit a bit quickly, through the gate. No one was running. This was not a stampede in a burning nightclub nor a rush for stadium seating.

I think it was done purely for a dramatic entrance. If they use the gate again and come through being flung, then well, there's a software error somewhere, but otherwise, drama, angst, let's have people getting banged up and wailing and sorta panicked.

The thing is that we as fans should not have to ask the writers 'what gives?' although I think I'll just toodle on over to Mallozzi's blog and ask just that...

again, just watch SG1 season 1 where carter has to compensate for interstellar drift to make the ride less bumpy. they later find out the other gates auto-dial yo update thier software somewhere in season 7ish I believe.

Adeneth
October 8th, 2009, 03:54 PM
Whatever the real reason- I'm glad someone surived. If they hadn't that would have been a really short show. I still don't know how some of those people managed to survive the bumpy exit.

ION'NOI
November 11th, 2009, 02:48 AM
I think the reason has to do with the 21 light year distance from Earth. Eli figured out that it was a code and that the point of origin has to be earth. Well if you use earths point of origin on another planet then that error will throw of any autocorrecting features of the gate. We know that gates with their own DHDs automatically update the gates position compensating for stellar drift.

escyos
November 11th, 2009, 04:02 PM
unstable power source. like in the fifth race and solitudes

Pharaoh Atem
November 12th, 2009, 06:33 PM
Why was everyone falling through? Is it because the ramp-gate elevation at Icarus Base was different than the floor-gate elevation on the Destiny?

watch the sg1 ep red sky. the wormhole was super long and to send people a billion light years from the milky way to destiny so quickly i'm sure speed had something to do wth it

timebandit
April 4th, 2010, 08:40 AM
and how many people actually went through to destiny - do we have a count or something...? it looked something like 50 people on the episode but....?

Pharaoh Atem
April 9th, 2010, 01:47 PM
and how many people actually went through to destiny - do we have a count or something...? it looked something like 50 people on the episode but....?

88 are aboard the destiny as of this ep.