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Major Clanger
June 5th, 2005, 02:12 AM
noooooooooo not in tea. Bleuch. Coffee and chocolate goes together, but tea?

Could it be the digestive fetish is that the writer wants to establish British credentials and - gasp! - might not be British? (I can't remember much reference to digestives in my reading matter - I'm intrigued now and I'll pay careful attention)

Mr Prophet
June 5th, 2005, 04:19 AM
I mean, seriously, the ONLY time digestives are good are when they is covered in chocolate and dunked in tea.


Plain digestives with cheese, I tells ya. Lovely.

jckfan55
June 5th, 2005, 11:37 AM
noooooooooo not in tea. Bleuch. Coffee and chocolate goes together, but tea?

Could it be the digestive fetish is that the writer wants to establish British credentials and - gasp! - might not be British? (I can't remember much reference to digestives in my reading matter - I'm intrigued now and I'll pay careful attention)
In my own reading it may not be so much of a digestive fetish as that I always notice when they're mentioned because I never could quite figure out what they were. :)

Major Clanger
June 5th, 2005, 12:46 PM
In my own reading it may not be so much of a digestive fetish as that I always notice when they're mentioned because I never could quite figure out what they were. :)

shame, I was quite excited about a digestive fetish...

Wordsmit2
June 6th, 2005, 10:57 AM
I have a question. I'm an American and when I have read fanfiction I have seen certain words hyphenated I've never seen before. For instants. The word Coordinate I often see spelled like Co-ordinate. Also cooperate will be spelled co-operate. I don't know where the writers who use these spellings come from so I don't know where it comes from.

England for one, but I don't know if those spellings are still considered conventional for fiction. (If not, then writers are imitating somewhat dated books.) In the U.S. they stopped spelling them that way in the second half of the 20th century.

chanvw
June 6th, 2005, 08:12 PM
England for one, but I don't know if those spellings are still considered conventional for fiction. (If not, then writers are imitating somewhat dated books.) In the U.S. they stopped spelling them that way in the second half of the 20th century.

I'm pretty sure I've seen the hyphenated spelling around in a lot of textbooks and Aussie newspapers that I read. In any case, I write those words with a hyphen, because if I read the unhyphenated (is that a word?) version, I have to urge to pronounce it "couperate" and "courdinate" (rhymes with who).

Wordsmit2
June 7th, 2005, 11:07 AM
In any case, I write those words with a hyphen, because if I read the unhyphenated (is that a word?) version, I have to urge to pronounce it "couperate" and "courdinate" (rhymes with who).

Yes, it is a word. And sometimes it's hyphenated! Go figure!

I'm betting "coordinate" will eventually go through a phase where it *is* pronouced "KOOR-din-ate". I sometimes wonder if spelling is designed simply to torment children. :rolleyes:

No, really, people just find it convenient to spell things in certain ways and if enough of them agree on a particular spelling, it becomes conventional. They don't think about how hard it is to learn the spelling because they already do it that way themselves.

Bringing this back to fanfic, if not "talking American", I often marvel at the text systems some young fanfic writers use. Most of the time they're just silly, but a few point up problems with conventional communication methods.

melpomene
June 13th, 2005, 08:49 PM
I've helped an Aussie with 'americanization" And since I'm from the mid-west I'm particularly qualified for "Jack-speak". But I do all the characters pretty well I think. I don't have time to frequent this thread, but if anyone needs advice pm me and I'll do what I can.

Shep'sSocks
June 15th, 2005, 06:17 AM
England for one, but I don't know if those spellings are still considered conventional for fiction. (If not, then writers are imitating somewhat dated books.) In the U.S. they stopped spelling them that way in the second half of the 20th century.

What has to be considered is the house styles of publications. The Style Manual for Writers, Editors and Printers is the Aus equivalent of MLA and Chicago, and it has 'cooperate' as one word, as is 'coordinate'. A lot of Australian publishing houses and newspapers rely on the AGPS Style Manual. However, some have their own house style and will spell 'co-operate' and 'co-operate' with a hyphen. One university for whom I've done typesetting insists that webpage is two words 'web page' (and 'web site', 'e-mail', etc) where the trend is to write them as one word. I don't know how many times I've been abused by Americans (in particular) for using a certain spelling when all I've done is use the Australian standard. I recall one time when it was the spelling of 'patronise' and I was patronisingly told that the spelling was 'patronize'. I quote the Style Manual to sort that one out. Countries have different spelling, grammar and punctuation standards and styles. While one can point to things being obviously wrong, it pays to check that the spelling, especially, isn't just the standard for that country.*

*Sayeth the editing teacher.

Mr Prophet
June 29th, 2005, 11:48 AM
In the States, if you reheat food the day after do you warm it up, over or through? More to the point, would a person in a bad way be described as looking like death warmed up, over or through?

jckfan55
June 29th, 2005, 11:56 AM
In the States, if you reheat food the day after do you warm it up, over or through? More to the point, would a person in a bad way be described as looking like death warmed up, over or through?

Good questions. Where I live in the US you "warm up" leftovers and feel or look like "death warmed over."

Major Clanger
June 29th, 2005, 11:57 AM
two words: food poisioning
;)
ah poop, caught posting instead of betaing
*runs away*

Mr Prophet
June 29th, 2005, 12:00 PM
two words: food poisioning
;)
ah poop, caught posting instead of betaing
*runs away*

I reheat my leftovers every day and I've only ever got food poisoning from a bad pizza and a reputable game pie.

jckfan55: I'd go the same, so I'll stick with that. Cheers.

Major Clanger
June 29th, 2005, 12:03 PM
you're lucky.
and mmmmmmm game pie
*gets hungry*

Mr Prophet
June 29th, 2005, 12:12 PM
you're lucky.

That and I make sure I heat things through properly.


and mmmmmmm game pie
*gets hungry*

I got sick, but not God of Friday sick. Ah well, back to Amy and her half-hearted suicide attempt.

Major Clanger
July 2nd, 2005, 04:47 AM
ha! I knew it would be her
*smug*

Mr Prophet
July 2nd, 2005, 09:27 AM
ha! I knew it would be her
*smug*

Did I drop hints about it? Guess it's not just your memory that's going.

To stay on topic, I need a US slang word for 'wife'. Would either 'missus' or 'other half' do?

Shipperahoy
July 2nd, 2005, 10:19 AM
Both of those would work. Or the "old ball and chain." :D Though using that depends on what context you're speaking of the wife in. ;)

Mr Prophet
July 2nd, 2005, 10:25 AM
Both of those would work. Or the "old ball and chain." :D Though using that depends on what context you're speaking of the wife in. ;)

Jack's pointing out to Sam the genetically-enhanced alien superwarrior whose husband she shot in the back.

Major Clanger
July 2nd, 2005, 10:39 AM
Did I drop hints about it? Guess it's not just your memory that's going.

To stay on topic, I need a US slang word for 'wife'. Would either 'missus' or 'other half' do?

actually it was a toss up between Cassie and her. But I think you like Llew too much to do that to him....

and you could say "better half" if you wanted to keep Lady Beta Readers Who Have Been Slogging At Fic All Day happy.

jckfan55
July 2nd, 2005, 02:50 PM
Jack's pointing out to Sam the genetically-enhanced alien superwarrior whose husband she shot in the back.
something like: "That's his missus over there." ?

Mr Prophet
July 2nd, 2005, 02:58 PM
something like: "That's his missus over there." ?

That's the one.

Mr Prophet
September 29th, 2005, 10:04 AM
In both an effort to reinvigorate the longest thread I ever started and in a genuine plea for help, would an American take a shine to somebody, if they liked them straight off?

ShimmeringStar
September 29th, 2005, 10:38 AM
In both an effort to reinvigorate the longest thread I ever started and in a genuine plea for help, would an American take a shine to somebody, if they liked them straight off?LOL! Yes, we would in certain parts of the U.S. :) I'm born and raised in the Mid-Atlantic area of the eastern seaboard and haven't really heard that much around here, but my father is from western North Carolina and methinks (vaguely) that I've heard the 'taking a shine' phrase used down there before....

Major Tyler
September 29th, 2005, 12:06 PM
In both an effort to reinvigorate the longest thread I ever started and in a genuine plea for help, would an American take a shine to somebody, if they liked them straight off?I know what you mean, but I was never say it unless I was being a "cheeky lit'l bugger" to my Irish co-worker. ;)

I'm from the Pacific Northwest of the U.S. and I've never heard anyone use those terms. In fact, where I'm from "taking a shine" has a distinctly sexual connotation.

KatG
September 29th, 2005, 02:25 PM
In both an effort to reinvigorate the longest thread I ever started and in a genuine plea for help, would an American take a shine to somebody, if they liked them straight off?

If the person saying it was from the southeast United States, particularly Alabama, Georgia, Tennesee, South Carolina or North Carolina, it wouldn't be strange at all to here them say it.

Mr Prophet
September 30th, 2005, 08:28 AM
If the person saying it was from the southeast United States, particularly Alabama, Georgia, Tennesee, South Carolina or North Carolina, it wouldn't be strange at all to here them say it.

Right. So it sounds as though I really want something else. What might you say in the more New Englandy parts of the Continental USA?

KatG
September 30th, 2005, 10:00 AM
Right. So it sounds as though I really want something else. What might you say in the more New Englandy parts of the Continental USA?

I'm not sure. I'm from Georgia. Only been to New England once in my life. I was trying to find a link to New England colloquialisms but so far nothing.

ForeverSg1
September 30th, 2005, 01:38 PM
Right. So it sounds as though I really want something else. What might you say in the more New Englandy parts of the Continental USA?

I'm not sure about other parts of the US, but where I come from although I've heard 'taking a shine to someone' before as a means to say 'you like someone' I doubt I have ever used it. If I were talking about someone liking someone else I'd probably say 'hots' or 'got it bad' instead.

Vala has the hots for Daniel.

or

Sam's got it bad for Jack.

another term I've heard around my neck of the woods

is to be sweet on someone, though this to me is a bit more outdated like taking a shine on.

However, according to my fourteen year old... all of the above terms are so out.

He says that either you 'like' someone as a friend or you 'like like' them. LOL

Mr Prophet
September 30th, 2005, 02:56 PM
Hmm. Well, the subject of the sentence is the AI of an alien spaceship, so I'm not sure that 'to have the hots for' would necessarily be the best phrasal verb to use.

jckfan55
September 30th, 2005, 03:47 PM
Do the AI and the person communicate? Then they could "hit it off."

Mr Prophet
September 30th, 2005, 03:51 PM
Do the AI and the person communicate? Then they could "hit it off."

Yes; the AI talks. Hit it off could work.

Major Clanger
October 1st, 2005, 05:07 AM
my hopes are dashed....

Mr Prophet
October 1st, 2005, 01:08 PM
That reminds me, actually. I'm pretty sure there are both sparrows and starlings in the USA, but can anyone tell me, are they fairly common garden bird in New York State?

Mr Prophet
October 2nd, 2005, 11:50 AM
And another question, this one more legal. What crime is it if you beat someone up really badly. Over here it would be GBH, but is it something different in the States? Specifically Massachusetts.

jckfan55
October 2nd, 2005, 12:00 PM
And another question, this one more legal. What crime is it if you beat someone up really badly. Over here it would be GBH, but is it something different in the States? Specifically Massachusetts.
probably assault and battery or aggravated assault.

Mr Prophet
October 2nd, 2005, 12:34 PM
probably assault and battery or aggravated assault.

Many thanks.

Beatrice Otter
October 2nd, 2005, 10:12 PM
Many thanks.
Huh. In all fifteen pages, not one person has brought up what is (to me) the most common, easiest indication of a British writer: "meant to" vs. "supposed to." We use them, as far as I can tell, almost exactly opposite: when I would use "supposed," a British author will say "meant" and vice versa. Even authors who are good at not using the obvious Britishisms (boot, jumper, biscuit, revising for a test, etc.) won't pick up on this one.

In America, this is how the word is supposed to be used: "I'm supposed to help you study for your test." "The alarm clock was supposed to go off at 7:30." It refers to facts, figures, the way things ought to be. "He wasn't supposed to care." "She was supposed to be in love with him."

"Meant" is more a matter of intent, especially as regards to people. "I meant to do that." "I didn't mean to do that." "She meant well." "He didn't mean to hurt her."

Mr Prophet
October 3rd, 2005, 08:56 AM
In America, this is how the word is supposed to be used: "I'm supposed to help you study for your test." "The alarm clock was supposed to go off at 7:30." It refers to facts, figures, the way things ought to be. "He wasn't supposed to care." "She was supposed to be in love with him."

Certainly in British English, meant is a perfectly acceptable, if slightly melodramatic, alternative to supposed here, as in: "It was meant to be." In such a case, the meant still refers to intent. If something is meant to be, it is willed by the organising principles of the universe, if you were meant to be in Glasgow when the bomb went off in your flat, then this refers to the bomber's intent not to kill.


"Meant" is more a matter of intent, especially as regards to people. "I meant to do that." "I didn't mean to do that." "She meant well." "He didn't mean to hurt her."

On the other hand, inserting supposed in place of meant in these examples is the mark, not of a British author, but of a complete idiot.

Major Tyler
October 3rd, 2005, 10:14 AM
"Meant" is more a matter of intent, especially as regards to people. "I meant to do that." "I didn't mean to do that." "She meant well." "He didn't mean to hurt her."On the other hand, inserting supposed in place of meant in these examples is the mark, not of a British author, but of a complete idiot.Cheers! :P You took the words right out of my mouth. I'm American and I have no idea what Beatice is on about. I've never heard/read anyone using "supposed" in such a manner, and Americans use "meant" the same what you described all the time! "It was meant to be" is not an odd phrase at all here in the U.S.

unowhoandwhy
October 3rd, 2005, 11:45 AM
And another question, this one more legal. What crime is it if you beat someone up really badly. Over here it would be GBH, but is it something different in the States? Specifically Massachusetts.

It's been eight years since I worked as a Special Police Officer in Massachusetts, so I had to look this up. It can be called Assault or Assault & Battery. Then there is ABDW (Assault & Battery With a Deadly Weapon). And then there's Mayhem (my fave, mostly because I just love the word, it isn't a nice crime http://www.mass.gov/legis/laws/mgl/265-14.htm ).

You can find a list of criminal MGLs (Mass. General Laws) on this page: http://www.mass.gov/legis/laws/mgl/gl-265-toc.htm

Beatrice Otter
October 3rd, 2005, 04:05 PM
Cheers! :P You took the words right out of my mouth. I'm American and I have no idea what Beatice is on about. I've never heard/read anyone using "supposed" in such a manner, and Americans use "meant" the same what you described all the time! "It was meant to be" is not an odd phrase at all here in the U.S.
I see authors use "meant to" in places I've only ever heard an American use "supposed to" and those are almost always associated with other britishisms or HP fanfic. E.g. Hermione telling Ron and Harry "We're meant to be studying," or something like that. Now, obviously, Ron, Harry, and Hermione should talk like that. But having Daniel or Jack or Carter use "meant" that way throws me. Or Buffy or Willow, or Trip Tucker. Because, like I said, I've never heard an American use the word that way.

Major Clanger
October 4th, 2005, 10:36 AM
I work with two Americans, and they use it the same way as I do.

Mind you, they say other things in a British way, so it could be my influence there.

KatG
October 4th, 2005, 11:02 AM
I have to say, I've never heard Americans use "meant" the way it's used in the UK either. Doesn't mean it isn't, just that I've never heard it and it does sound a bit strange to my ears. But not enough to throw me out of the story. I'd probably just shrug it off as a "northern" or "mid-western" thing. 8)

Like Beatrice, I would say "I was supposed to meet you at 2:00." not "I was meant to meet you at 2:00." Now I could say "I meant to meet you at 2:00." and that would sound perfectly normal.

Mr Prophet
November 17th, 2005, 12:33 PM
Like Beatrice, I would say "I was supposed to meet you at 2:00." not "I was meant to meet you at 2:00." Now I could say "I meant to meet you at 2:00." and that would sound perfectly normal.

I might say 'I was meant to meet you' if I didn't know someone so well; perhaps if someone else had asked me to meet them. Just a gut feeling, not founded on first principles.

Anyway, to the purpose of the thread: What would be the American expression for sheer, overwhelming cheek? In England we might say front, or even neck, but what would the US equivalent be. If there are multiple options, which would sound right coming from Sam?

jckfan55
November 17th, 2005, 01:07 PM
I might say 'I was meant to meet you' if I didn't know someone so well; perhaps if someone else had asked me to meet them. Just a gut feeling, not founded on first principles.

Anyway, to the purpose of the thread: What would be the American expression for sheer, overwhelming cheek? In England we might say front, or even neck, but what would the US equivalent be. If there are multiple options, which would sound right coming from Sam?

Good question. The first thing that comes to mind would be gall. As in "McKay has some gall criticizing my work." Or you might say "Where does he get off thinking he is an expert?" You sometimes hear "chutzpah" but I don't see Sam using that one.

KatG
November 17th, 2005, 02:49 PM
Good question. The first thing that comes to mind would be gall. As in "McKay has some gall criticizing my work." Or you might say "Where does he get off thinking he is an expert?" You sometimes hear "chutzpah" but I don't see Sam using that one.

I don't see Sam as saying "chutzpah" either. The ones you mentioned would work or even "he's got some nerve saying I make things up" or "I can't believe he had the audacity to question me."

Major Tyler
November 17th, 2005, 08:30 PM
Anyway, to the purpose of the thread: What would be the American expression for sheer, overwhelming cheek?Gall...definitely gall. You could also use "nerve."

Livi2Jack
November 20th, 2005, 04:45 PM
That reminds me, actually. I'm pretty sure there are both sparrows and starlings in the USA, but can anyone tell me, are they fairly common garden bird in New York State?
Sparrows are common all over the East Coast of the U.S. Starlings are here in Virginia. So I would guess New York has them too. We are both on major bird flyways.

Mr Prophet
December 5th, 2005, 10:07 AM
Another book question: Who is the top author for teenage girls in the States at present? I'm looking for someone who writes contemporary novels about friendship, rather than a fantasy or SF author.

Tracy Jane
December 5th, 2005, 03:26 PM
By the way, being a very, very British girl without much US exposure, I have one or two questions.

Firstly, do you ever use lift, or must I use elevator?
Can I get away with mobile, or is cell phone better?
Jell-o is a trademark version of Jelly. So what is jelly normally referred to as (yes, I know, ended in a preposition). Do you always say jell-o?

KatG
December 5th, 2005, 04:32 PM
By the way, being a very, very British girl without much US exposure, I have one or two questions.

Firstly, do you ever use lift, or must I use elevator?
Can I get away with mobile, or is cell phone better?
Jell-o is a trademark version of Jelly. So what is jelly normally referred to as (yes, I know, ended in a preposition). Do you always say jell-o?

We never use lift, it's always an elevator.

We might call it a mobile, but most people say cell phone.

And if it looks like Jello, taste like Jello and wiggles like Jello, then regardless of what brand geletin it is, we call it jello. 8)

LurkerLa
December 5th, 2005, 04:39 PM
Another book question: Who is the top author for teenage girls in the States at present? I'm looking for someone who writes contemporary novels about friendship, rather than a fantasy or SF author.
That would depend on which end of the teenage spectrum you're looking at. Not having been a teenager for several years, my info might be a little shaky, but I think for younger teens, Meg Cabot (author of The Princess Diaries and several others) is pretty popular. Ann Brashares's Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants and its sequels are popular as well. I'm not sure about older teens, though I could probably get an idea just by skimming the library shelves when I go to return my books.


By the way, being a very, very British girl without much US exposure, I have one or two questions.

Firstly, do you ever use lift, or must I use elevator?
Can I get away with mobile, or is cell phone better?
Jell-o is a trademark version of Jelly. So what is jelly normally referred to as (yes, I know, ended in a preposition). Do you always say jell-o?

A. We would always use elevator (except for those of us who have been over-exposed to you Brits - I still blame my neighbor for my compulsion to say "Sorry?" when I need someone to repeat something. Everyone else here says "What?" or "Excuse me?")
B. People would know what you meant with "mobile," and I have heard some people say "mobile phone" but most use "cell phone."
C. Usually jello, although if you were reading a cookbook it might say "flavored gelatin." Jelly for us is like jam, but without chunks of fruit (I believe jam is made from actual fruit, jelly from fruit juice).

Tracy Jane
December 6th, 2005, 04:51 PM
Haha... the most used word in the British dictionary.... sorry.

If you want to know how to be British, according to my German friends, insert Sorry or Thank You every three to four words!

Wordsmit2
December 7th, 2005, 05:15 AM
Firstly, do you ever use lift, or must I use elevator?

Americans *do* use "lift" sometimes. A non-enclosed platform that can raise and lower may be called a lift. (e.g. a scissor lift) Also, it's not uncommon for an elevator in a warehouse to be referred to as a lift.


Can I get away with mobile, or is cell phone better?

If you call it a mobile phone. Unless you've already established that it's a phone you're referring to, the reader is going to wonder why you're suddenly talking about a toy.

Mr Prophet
December 7th, 2005, 09:07 AM
That would depend on which end of the teenage spectrum you're looking at. Not having been a teenager for several years, my info might be a little shaky, but I think for younger teens, Meg Cabot (author of The Princess Diaries and several others) is pretty popular. Ann Brashares's Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants and its sequels are popular as well. I'm not sure about older teens, though I could probably get an idea just by skimming the library shelves when I go to return my books.

Hmm. The pants one sounds like it would be the best JW analogue. Thanks.

Arctic Goddess
December 19th, 2005, 10:59 PM
This is really funny.

Firstly, reading through (thru) the posts, Canadians do not say "lounge" for "living room". We say living room.
Secondly, Amanda Tapping is Canadian. Of course she will sound like one.
Thirdly, quite often, something will be said on Stargate that only Canadians would get. Jack's comment about Curling in the Episode, "A Hundred Days", reached Canadians because many of us are mad about the sport. Also, Jack and Teal'c discussion about favorite hockey teams in "The Other Guys", when the Canucks of Vancouver are mentioned by Teal'c also appealed to Canadians. There are many other references but are too many to mention here.

My point is that it is impossible to be perfectly accurate when a series is shot in one location all of the time. If Amanda Tapping says "Root" for route (rought - as Americans say) then welcome to the world of international television. The rest of the world has been listening to Americans say "Zee" for "Zed" for decades.
Please, you Americans, with all due respect, get over yourselves. You are not the centre of the universe.
I'm probably going to get it from all sides for this, but life is too short to worry about how something is said by someone who is not an American.
There are more pressing issues, guys.

Mr Prophet
December 20th, 2005, 09:00 AM
I'm probably going to get it from all sides for this, but life is too short to worry about how something is said by someone who is not an American.
There are more pressing issues, guys.

Ah...Actually, this thread isn't for talking about how other people say things, it's for non-US fanfic authors, like myself, to find appropriate colloquialisms to make American characters sound American. Well, US characters sound US; Canadians and Brazillians are Americans too.

KatG
December 20th, 2005, 09:43 AM
Please, you Americans, with all due respect, get over yourselves. You are not the centre of the universe.
I'm probably going to get it from all sides for this, but life is too short to worry about how something is said by someone who is not an American.
There are more pressing issues, guys.

Um. Excuse me? Hello. Did you totally miss the first post in the thread? You say you've read through it, but obviously you missed the entire point. Yes there may have been some references to how characters on Stargate say things, but the idea is for fanfic writers who are not from the US to ask for help to make their characters sound US.

Maybe you should take a little more time to read through the forum before you start telling people to get over themselves.

ShimmeringStar
December 21st, 2005, 05:25 PM
This is really funny.

Firstly, reading through (thru) the posts, Canadians do not say "lounge" for "living room". We say living room.
Secondly, Amanda Tapping is Canadian. Of course she will sound like one.
Thirdly, quite often, something will be said on Stargate that only Canadians would get. Jack's comment about Curling in the Episode, "A Hundred Days", reached Canadians because many of us are mad about the sport. Also, Jack and Teal'c discussion about favorite hockey teams in "The Other Guys", when the Canucks of Vancouver are mentioned by Teal'c also appealed to Canadians. There are many other references but are too many to mention here.

My point is that it is impossible to be perfectly accurate when a series is shot in one location all of the time. If Amanda Tapping says "Root" for route (rought - as Americans say) then welcome to the world of international television. The rest of the world has been listening to Americans say "Zee" for "Zed" for decades.

Please, you Americans, with all due respect, get over yourselves. You are not the centre of the universe.
I'm probably going to get it from all sides for this, but life is too short to worry about how something is said by someone who is not an American.
There are more pressing issues, guys. Well… AG – allow me be the first to welcome you (since you do seem to have only 3 posts at the moment) to the international bulletin board – GW – if noone has done so. We’re from all over the globe and we’re all typing English, but we all use it in different ways and have a multitude of dialects and accents when we speak it. It’s not a good thing to make blanket statements about “all you Americans” because we’re a pretty diverse group of people. Much like "you all" Canadians, eh?

It’s a pity you don’t give us credit for “getting” the in-jokes or realizing the differences in the pronunciations of certain words…. Like AT’s ‘process’ as in pro-ducer instead of prah-cess as is heard ‘round my part of the world. And since you brought up the route thing – I’m located in the Mid-Atlantic region of the U.S. and personally use both the Root and Rought pronunciations for Route. For some reason it has to do with whether or not it is a route (road) # with 2 or 3 numbers in it; don’t know why – it’s just what I do. I live on Route ##, but I work on Root ###.

Interestingly enough, a good number of fans who come here to have fun and take a temporary break from those ‘pressing issues’ of real life do seem to realize that SG is a Canadian-produced show dominated by Canadian acting and writing talent, however… when the premise and canon of the show is that the characters, SG1 at least, are born & raised in the States (excepting Teal’c) and are working deep in the depths of a mountain in Colorado, USA, then hmmmmmm… I wonder why then a fan fic author would care a fig about making sure they used cookie instead of biscuit, bathroom instead of loo, etc. etc., especially if they’d like to offer a professional-quality fiction for others to read?

Ah well…. Best wishes on your posting career here.:)

Mr Prophet
February 11th, 2006, 03:06 PM
Another question: What's a good way of saying that someone has given someone else a telling off. Is telling off good American, or would you be likely to use something else?

Major Tyler
February 11th, 2006, 04:22 PM
Another question: What's a good way of saying that someone has given someone else a telling off. Is telling off good American, or would you be likely to use something else?We would say we "told someone off" rather than saying we "gave someone a telling off."

For example...

American Woman: "I told that jerk off when he grabbed my butt!"

American Man: "Some chick just told me off for grabbing her butt...it was totally worth it, though!"

Commander Ivanova
February 13th, 2006, 03:00 AM
Amanda Tapping is Canadian.

Tiny nit-pick here, AT is in fact English but was raised in Canada since the age of 3. Given that background, you could expect her to speak "Canadian English" with a UK influence.

Jynjyr
February 14th, 2006, 04:39 PM
<snip>
It’s a pity you don’t give us credit for “getting” the in-jokes or realizing the differences in the pronunciations of certain words…. Like AT’s ‘process’ as in pro-ducer instead of prah-cess as is heard ‘round my part of the world. And since you brought up the route thing – I’m located in the Mid-Atlantic region of the U.S. and personally use both the Root and Rought pronunciations for Route. For some reason it has to do with whether or not it is a route (road) # with 2 or 3 numbers in it; don’t know why – it’s just what I do. I live on Route ##, but I work on Root ###.
<snip>

Ah well…. Best wishes on your posting career here.:)
((( Shimmering Star )))
I thought I was the only 'oddball' to pronounce 'Route' as 'root' and 'rought'. I can take 'root' 2 somewhere or I can take 'rought' 90. I seem to have no rhyme or reason to my changes. Whim I guess.

Comment on Topic. Living east of the Mississippi and North of Tennesee, I have to watch terms I put in the mouths of SG-1. It may be 'pop' where I live but, it's 'soda' somewhere else. And sometimes I'm lucky enough to be conversing with one of my Colorado co-workers when I have a question like that. Confuses the HECK out of them. :)
Of course, I'm nitpicky enough that I checked a current map to see if there really could be warehouse where I said it was and how long it would take to drive from that location to the Air Force Academy hospital. It bugs me that I don't have Jack's street address.

Major Tyler
February 14th, 2006, 04:44 PM
Route pronounced "root" is generally meaning a road, while route pronounced "rought" means to divert or distract.

Jynjyr
February 14th, 2006, 05:04 PM
These mispronounciations brought to you by the person who has "aigs" for breakfast and who's 'laigs' are cold right now. :D Mom was from DC. Any connection?
I also have 'tars' on my 'cahr'. LOL The wonders of American English.

KatG
February 15th, 2006, 09:04 AM
((( Shimmering Star )))
I thought I was the only 'oddball' to pronounce 'Route' as 'root' and 'rought'. I can take 'root' 2 somewhere or I can take 'rought' 90. I seem to have no rhyme or reason to my changes. Whim I guess.



I do the same thing. I would love to drive "Root" 66, but my mother in law lives on Rural "Rowt" 1.

And you made a good point, it's not enough just make sure your character sounds like he's/she's from the US, you also have to make sure they sound like they're from whatever part of the country they're from. It's easy with Sam and Daniel, both of them moved around enough as children to have a rather broad range of colloquialisms, Teal'c of course isn't from earth, but Jack is definitely mid-western, Hammond is definitely mid-south (Texas/Arkansas), and Janet seems to have more of a Southern bent. Makes it fun to find their voices doesn't it?

Jynjyr
February 15th, 2006, 06:08 PM
Yeahsureyabetcha! Tea'c is fairly easy. Sam and Daniel have there own mannerisms that help. Janet was a fly by in one fic. She's more in another one. I'm going to have to check on that.

I've been doing SG-1 / MacGyver crossovers. Try keeping them straight. Since I 'hear' what they say, I had a heck of a time when I started.

KatG
February 16th, 2006, 04:57 AM
Yeahsureyabetcha! Tea'c is fairly easy. Sam and Daniel have there own mannerisms that help. Janet was a fly by in one fic. She's more in another one. I'm going to have to check on that.

I've been doing SG-1 / MacGyver crossovers. Try keeping them straight. Since I 'hear' what they say, I had a heck of a time when I started.

So I'm not the only one that "hears" them as I write. That's good to know. 8)

JazzyChick
February 16th, 2006, 04:04 PM
i know this question was asked a while back, but about popular authors for american teenage girls... well i am one and i refuse to read those two serirs of books because they're soooo corney. its the 'we're all friends and live happily ever after' kind of books and i can't stand them. i don't mean to diss those authors at all, its just that they're not my type of book. i just wouldn't call them the most popular authors.

i like these:
S.E Hinton (a little old school, but she's still comming out with new stuff and The Outsiders[I] is required reading in most high schools.
Tamora Pierce (she writes fantacy, but all the main characters are girls and i like her a lot)
the book [I]Speak i forget who wrote it, but its one of the best books i have ever read.

umm...that's all i can think of off the top of my head. ('cept of course harry potter...) but if you want any more i can go raid my book shelf...

UlsterBob
March 11th, 2006, 09:13 AM
It was a nice touch in one of the Season 2 Atlantis episodes that Beckett asked for a "torch" first instead of a "flashlight".

Note to Americans: They're called torches! They shouldn't flash unless there's something wrong with them!!! ;)

Major Tyler
March 11th, 2006, 09:18 AM
Note to Americans: They're called torches! They shouldn't flash unless there's something wrong with them!!! ;)Torches are wooden sticks that are lit on fire. ;)

jckfan55
March 11th, 2006, 10:06 AM
Torches are wooden sticks that are lit on fire. ;)
And usually held by villagers chasing the Frankenstein monster out of town. :D

KatG
March 12th, 2006, 04:29 PM
And usually held by villagers chasing the Frankenstein monster out of town. :D

Can't really see a flashlight having the same effect.;)

captainpash
March 12th, 2006, 04:47 PM
I didn't realize americain was a language... Well time to stop making fun of that crazy women on VCPR.

rarocks24
March 12th, 2006, 05:39 PM
American isn't a language...it's a dialect (actually, a group of dialects belonging to North America in general and the United States in particular).

Also, the various dialects can be (mid-west, southeast, northeast, northwest, and southwest) integrated. Most Americans nowadays speak in milder variants of these than there use to be. With television pumping out all over the place, regional dialects are starting to lighten. Some people nowadays say coke in particular to coca cola, and/or ask specifically for a certain drink (Dr. Pepper, Sprint, Mr. Pibb). Terms like "yall" are beginning to spread (in my mind it should, there should be no reason why you shouldn't be able to compound "you all" into "yall", but only in verbal language, even in the South you won't see "you all" conjuncted in written language.)

Major Tyler
March 12th, 2006, 09:30 PM
American isn't a language...it's a dialect (actually, a group of dialects belonging to North America in general and the United States in particular).I don't know...American English and UK English are almost different enough to be considered different languages. For example, don't ever compliment a British woman on her fanny pack. :S

Wordsmit2
March 14th, 2006, 01:27 PM
There's a cold medicine commercial where people complain they're stuffed up. :eek: (The writer meant "stopped up", i.e. congested.)

Major Tyler
March 14th, 2006, 02:47 PM
There's a cold medicine commercial where people complain they're stuffed up. :eek: (The writer meant "stopped up", i.e. congested.)I've always heard "stuffed up" when referring to a "stuffy nose." "Stopped up" is used for a clogged drain and such.

Major Clanger
March 17th, 2006, 10:40 AM
Stuffed up is deffo what Brits say
(although I say "full of cold")

Gatetrixer
March 17th, 2006, 07:58 PM
Personally, I think the person must have mis-heard the "whilst", but she swore up and down it was there. I can't remember the episode in question, but I might still have that discussion saved in my email: I'll check.

I personally love reading stories set in England, and I always hope that the characters will be speaking England-English as part of the story's flavor. In that case, I'd be thrown out of the story if the characters started speaking U.S.-English. If the character is English, I'm a big fan of "parlous", "arrant", and most especially "whilst". I honestly don't get what the pay off is for insisting a bunch of characters living in Colorado somehow acquired Britishness. :-/

Later,
Graculus

I read quite a few books set in the UK and so have got used to words and expressions used there. I expect them, just as I expect stories set in the US to use American expressions, or regional American ones, if appropriate. I don't see why fic writers would be upset if someone pointed out to them that Jack wouldn't use a torch at his cabin. (And if he torched the cabin it would be burning merrily away after a time.) I've never actually told anyone that their fic was full of Anglicisms, however. It doesn't retard my enjoyment if it is well written, though I certainly notice them. And while I'm on the subject, do Americans say ensuite referring to bathrooms? Or is this an English (though French originally) term? I have never heard of it before fanfic and I've been on this earth awhile. Anyway, I would think that certain well known terms like "Mum" for "Mom" would be avoided, while whether to research more obscure differences would be up to the writer. Differences in speech interest me. My husband was born and brought up in the same US state as I was, but the speech in his area contain a number of different terms than from my area. I've had to adjust to his way rather than the other way around.

BTW, I'm pretty sure I saw one of SG(American) characters eating English style when using her fork.

Gatetrixer
March 17th, 2006, 08:38 PM
That reminds me, actually. I'm pretty sure there are both sparrows and starlings in the USA, but can anyone tell me, are they fairly common garden bird in New York State?

Sparrows(the house sparrow, often called English sparrow) and starlings are common pretty much all over the USA and regarded as pests or not desirable. They were both introduced from Europe. They are regarded as pests not because of that, but because they crown out other species, congregate together to produce messes, etc. No one puts out bird feeders to attract sparrows and starlings, but they come anyway. There are also native sparrows but they're not as common and don't usually show themselves around residences. The robin (the American kind) would be a common yard or lawn (garden to Brits) bird in New York, I think. Probably goldfinches, too. Goldfinches usually go south in winter. Chickadees are around all winter.

Major Clanger
March 17th, 2006, 11:52 PM
I guess sparrows are just our revenge for grey squirrels then!

;)

Gatetrixer
March 18th, 2006, 10:31 PM
I guess sparrows are just our revenge for grey squirrels then!

;)

Explain. Were gray squirrels introduced into the British Isles? They're not seen much where I live in the Midwest. Fox squirrels reign, and they can have a grayish color, but mainly red.

Which reminds me, I would have thought "Shades of Grey" would have been "Shades of Gray." Gray is the usual American spelling.

Major Clanger
March 19th, 2006, 01:06 AM
apparently grey squirrels were brought back from The Americas way back when, and since their introduction to the wild our native, smaller, red squirrels have been in decline.

Is it "Grey" in the title? I've never really noticed!

KatG
March 19th, 2006, 07:40 AM
And while I'm on the subject, do Americans say ensuite referring to bathrooms? Or is this an English (though French originally) term? I have never heard of it before fanfic and I've been on this earth awhile.

BTW, I'm pretty sure I saw one of SG(American) characters eating English style when using her fork.

No Americans generally do not say ensuite to refer to bathrooms. When I first saw it in a fic it really threw me. I eventually figured out from the context what it was, but it's definitely a Brit term.


Oh and what's the English style to use a fork?

Major Tyler
March 19th, 2006, 07:46 AM
apparently grey squirrels were brought back from The Americas way back when, and since their introduction to the wild our native, smaller, red squirrels have been in decline.Sweet! Our squirrels kick your squirrels' ass! :P ;)

Proud to be an American...squirrel!

http://img124.imageshack.us/img124/2585/unitedstates565xs.jpg

dude22
March 19th, 2006, 07:58 AM
American isn't a language...it's a dialect (actually, a group of dialects belonging to North America in general and the United States in particular).

Also, the various dialects can be (mid-west, southeast, northeast, northwest, and southwest) integrated. Most Americans nowadays speak in milder variants of these than there use to be. With television pumping out all over the place, regional dialects are starting to lighten. Some people nowadays say coke in particular to coca cola, and/or ask specifically for a certain drink (Dr. Pepper, Sprint, Mr. Pibb). Terms like "yall" are beginning to spread (in my mind it should, there should be no reason why you shouldn't be able to compound "you all" into "yall", but only in verbal language, even in the South you won't see "you all" conjuncted in written language.)

true, but there are still some differances. im from buffalo, and i always get made fun of by people from out of town. ex-we say pop, not "soda" and , so i have been told we have flat "A"s like in car="kaur"

Mr Prophet
March 19th, 2006, 08:19 AM
Oh and what's the English style to use a fork?

Only left-handed; rather than left handed to cut food, then right-handed to eat. That's what got the bald agent killed in the film OSA, switching hands in a cafe in France.

LurkerLa
March 19th, 2006, 08:46 AM
Only left-handed; rather than left handed to cut food, then right-handed to eat. That's what got the bald agent killed in the film OSA, switching hands in a cafe in France.
Or vice versa should you be left-handed, as I am.

And that's funny. I thought that (the "English style") was how everyone ate. It seems like it's extra effort to switch your fork from hand to hand between cutting and eating.

jckfan55
March 19th, 2006, 09:41 AM
Or vice versa should you be left-handed, as I am.

And that's funny. I thought that (the "English style") was how everyone ate. It seems like it's extra effort to switch your fork from hand to hand between cutting and eating.
I heard a story that Americans do the switching thing because when the colonies started getting forks as routine utensils they made up their own way of using them since they didn't know how they were being used in the Mother Country. Don't know how accurate that is.

Major Clanger
March 19th, 2006, 11:51 AM
well, all I can say is anyone who thinks the American way is odd and awkward should get themselves to Germany - I swear they have no idea about cutlery and elbows and practicality. I have seen entire families eating in such a mental covoluted way I want to stab them in the eye with their forks!!!

And having seen many Dutch and Germans eat I would say that the Americans probably inherited it from them.

As for the British way, why, Kat, it is the correct way of course :P

Gatetrixer
March 19th, 2006, 12:19 PM
Sparrows(the house sparrow, often called English sparrow) and starlings are common pretty much all over the USA and regarded as pests or not desirable. They were both introduced from Europe. They are regarded as pests not because of that, but because they crowd out other species, congregate together to produce messes, etc. No one puts out bird feeders to attract sparrows and starlings, but they come anyway. There are also native sparrows but they're not as common and don't usually show themselves around residences. The robin (the American kind) would be a common yard or lawn (garden to Brits) bird in New York, I think. Probably goldfinches, too. Goldfinches usually go south in winter. Chickadees are around all winter.

Just correcting a typo.

Gatetrixer
March 19th, 2006, 12:26 PM
Only left-handed; rather than left handed to cut food, then right-handed to eat. That's what got the bald agent killed in the film OSA, switching hands in a cafe in France.


Don't Brits also push food onto the tines of the fork (which is being held upside down in the left hand, i.e. the tines are pointed down) with a spoon or knife held in the right hand? R ead that somewhere, I think.

Major Tyler
March 19th, 2006, 12:30 PM
Someone must be writing a fanfic that involves a lot of dramatic eating, LOL. :P

KatG
March 19th, 2006, 01:43 PM
Only left-handed; rather than left handed to cut food, then right-handed to eat. That's what got the bald agent killed in the film OSA, switching hands in a cafe in France.

Oh okay. I just thought it was the logical way to eat. 8) I have seen people do the switch thing, but to me it's too much trouble, so I eat the "English" way.

KatG
March 19th, 2006, 01:44 PM
As for the British way, why, Kat, it is the correct way of course :P

Why of course. It's probably quite posh too. :p

Matt G
March 20th, 2006, 03:29 PM
Only left-handed; rather than left handed to cut food, then right-handed to eat. That's what got the bald agent killed in the film OSA, switching hands in a cafe in France.

Hmmm...I'd best avoid French cafes then!;) I'm a Brit but I switch hands because my right hand is my only decent hand(but I'm aware it's traditionally a US style).

Of course switching hands would probably be enough for some of the Net's/world's dumber/most paranoid denizens to be dead cert I'm a Yank.

ShimmeringStar
March 20th, 2006, 07:45 PM
It's okay Matt. I'm a rightie and eat with the fork in my right hand. But when it comes to cutting something that can't be chopped in half easily with a fork... I switch the fork to the left and cut with the knife with the right. (Now I might try to cut with my left.... *chuckles* but then some food might go sliding off my plate too!)

(And I really don't pay any attention to how others use their utensils... guess because half the immediate family are righties, the other half lefties and we see it all...)

Major Clanger
March 21st, 2006, 08:26 AM
*thinks of other uses for forks*

Sure, Brits do the other way of eating. But for us, traditionally, (and I realise I'm leaving myself wide open to accusations of poshness here - the benefits of a public-school education ;)) we hold the knife in the left hand (NOT LIKE A PEN) and the fork, tines curved down towards the plate, in the right.

The fork goes into the food, and the knife cuts off a small portion, which is then lifted to the mouth without turning the fork at all.

And if you're very posh,you eat peas by squishing them onto your fork...

KatG
March 21st, 2006, 08:39 AM
*thinks of other uses for forks*

Sure, Brits do the other way of eating. But for us, traditionally, (and I realise I'm leaving myself wide open to accusations of poshness here - the benefits of a public-school education ;)) we hold the knife in the left hand (NOT LIKE A PEN) and the fork, tines curved down towards the plate, in the right.

The fork goes into the food, and the knife cuts off a small portion, which is then lifted to the mouth without turning the fork at all.

And if you're very posh,you eat peas by squishing them onto your fork...

So, shall I now start referring to you as "her poshness". :p

Major Clanger
March 21st, 2006, 10:44 AM
only if you don't want me to,oh so stylishly, stick my fork into you.
:D

KatG
March 21st, 2006, 11:27 AM
only if you don't want me to,oh so stylishly, stick my fork into you.
:D

*exagerated bow*

Yes "your poshness". Whatever you say "your poshness".

Major Clanger
March 21st, 2006, 01:59 PM
*polishes fork*

Hi Kat

*polishes spoon as back up*

KatG
March 21st, 2006, 02:24 PM
*polishes fork*

Hi Kat

*polishes spoon as back up*

What? Not enough groveling for you?

Major Clanger
March 21st, 2006, 02:36 PM
Kat, Kat, Kat!
you know there is never enough grovelling for me!!

;-)

jckfan55
March 21st, 2006, 02:46 PM
How about this food item? I heard from someone that people in Europe eat hamburgers on a bun with a knife and fork. Americans just pick the whole thing up to eat. True? Urban legend?

KatG
March 22nd, 2006, 05:25 AM
Kat, Kat, Kat!
you know there is never enough grovelling for me!!

;-)

*sighs*

Oh the trials of being posh.

Skydiver
March 22nd, 2006, 05:42 AM
It's okay Matt. I'm a rightie and eat with the fork in my right hand. But when it comes to cutting something that can't be chopped in half easily with a fork... I switch the fork to the left and cut with the knife with the right. (Now I might try to cut with my left.... *chuckles* but then some food might go sliding off my plate too!)

(And I really don't pay any attention to how others use their utensils... guess because half the immediate family are righties, the other half lefties and we see it all...)
that's how I eat. I've tried the whole knife in the left, fork in the right bit....just doesn't work for me

Major Clanger
March 22nd, 2006, 10:09 AM
How about this food item? I heard from someone that people in Europe eat hamburgers on a bun with a knife and fork. Americans just pick the whole thing up to eat. True? Urban legend?
that's something I've never seen... doesn't mean it doesn't happen though
:D

Wordsmit2
March 23rd, 2006, 03:18 AM
BTW, I'm pretty sure I saw one of SG(American) characters eating English style when using her fork.

Not remarkable. If she was stationed in Europe for some time, or if she's from an upper crust family, or if her parents sent her to one of those etiquette courses...

Or maybe she's practicing because she's planning a trip to France. :rolleyes:

Jynjyr
March 23rd, 2006, 03:48 AM
I'm American and I eat that way sometimes. Mainly something that you keep cutting pieces from, like steak. I'm too lazy to keep switching hands.
I learned it in Germany, I was trying to blend in with my co-workers.

Chrysalis
March 29th, 2006, 04:32 AM
I don't know...American English and UK English are almost different enough to be considered different languages. For example, don't ever compliment a British woman on her fanny pack. :S

OMG! You said fanny!! That's the first naughty word a lot of kids learn here.. So don't say it to an Australian either. And for the record, you don't want to talk to us about 'rooting' for football teams, either. :eek:

Chrysalis
March 29th, 2006, 04:39 AM
No Americans generally do not say ensuite to refer to bathrooms. When I first saw it in a fic it really threw me. I eventually figured out from the context what it was, but it's definitely a Brit term.


Oh and what's the English style to use a fork?
An ensuite is a bathroom attached to a bedroom. I thought that was a word that was commonly used around the world.

I can acutally pick the English fanfics because they say things like "are you coming to mine" instead of saying "my house".

As for eating English-style, knife in your right hand, fork in your left, I presume is what people mean. Well we do that in Australia too. My mother would have given me a clip over the ear if I ate any other way!! Not polite, apparently!

LurkerLa
March 29th, 2006, 05:33 AM
An ensuite is a bathroom attached to a bedroom. I thought that was a word that was commonly used around the world.

I can acutally pick the English fanfics because they say things like "are you coming to mine" instead of saying "my house".

As for eating English-style, knife in your right hand, fork in your left, I presume is what people mean. Well we do that in Australia too. My mother would have given me a clip over the ear if I ate any other way!! Not polite, apparently!
I've always heard ensuite for a bathroom attached to a bedroom, as well, although it's not something I hear in everyday conversation and it's probably not the most common thing.

And what is with you people? Always talking about right hand knife, left hand fork. We lefties know the correct way - left hand knife, right hand fork. ;) And everyone knows only left-handed people are in their right minds. :P

I was talking to my brother the other day, and I realized that although both of us eat like that - without the constant hand switching - neither our mother nor our father does. So who knows where we learned it. :D

(Just to clarify, I'm American. Probably obvious, but best to be certain.)

vaberella
March 29th, 2006, 07:31 AM
Or vice versa should you be left-handed, as I am.

And that's funny. I thought that (the "English style") was how everyone ate. It seems like it's extra effort to switch your fork from hand to hand between cutting and eating.


Eating style as in the way you use your fork for knife is not really 'British' or 'American' it's just etiquette. What's happened is that etiquette has turned lazy, so people in some parts of the world Britian included don't bother with the technicalities and don't waste their time on changing hands. Long used etiquette though, demands the action. It's good and it's bad. I mean lately people look sloppy, and since I never really understood how to cut with a knife during a meal (these things are taught by the way in actual schools...to this day there are etiquette schools for both women and men)....it's rather uncomfortable utensil for me, and since I don't eat food I need to cut really, I don't bother with a knife. :)

vaberella
March 29th, 2006, 07:38 AM
I've always heard ensuite for a bathroom attached to a bedroom, as well, although it's not something I hear in everyday conversation and it's probably not the most common thing.

This is what I'm familiar with as well. When I was in London the ensuite wasn't really in reference to the bathroom....or toilet. Since I noticed in England, the toilet bowl and bath, with the sink were separate, as they should bloody well be. Anyway, the toilet was called the toilet, or the loo. The ensuite was in referece to a toilet/bathroom attached to a bedroom.

I thought it was common language in America as well. I only know of America having a thousand references to the bathroom....from the John, to Ladies Room, to the now interchangeable powder room, restroom----you can now rest in the rest room...the shi-shi places now have sofas! I don't know who'd want to sit around reading a catalogue while their friend is going No.2....:confused: :rolleyes: :( :D

Chrysalis
March 29th, 2006, 12:36 PM
I've always heard ensuite for a bathroom attached to a bedroom, as well, although it's not something I hear in everyday conversation and it's probably not the most common thing.

And what is with you people? Always talking about right hand knife, left hand fork. We lefties know the correct way - left hand knife, right hand fork. ;) And everyone knows only left-handed people are in their right minds. :P

I was talking to my brother the other day, and I realized that although both of us eat like that - without the constant hand switching - neither our mother nor our father does. So who knows where we learned it. :D

(Just to clarify, I'm American. Probably obvious, but best to be certain.)

Ensuite is a very common word here. In fact most people seem to have an ensuite in their house! In new homes, they're standard. In older homes, people renovate to have them put in. There are some massive ones in new houses that are pretty much full bathrooms.

I'm a lefty too -- but I do have the knife in the right and the fork in the left. I feel funny eating without a utensil in both hands -- it'd be awkward to eat with just a fork!

As for other things -- I've always been amused by the American term "going to the bathroom". I remember when I was a kid, not understanding that they actually meant going to the toilet. Over here, it's always going to the toilet/loo/dunny whatever! Most people I know actually have their toilet separate to their bathroom, so going to the bathroom would imply that you're having a bath or a shower!

Of course, living in a shoebox of a flat, I have an ensuite bathroom to my only bedroom, and unfortunately it does have a toilet in it, instead of separate! (grrr!)

KatG
March 29th, 2006, 02:01 PM
Ensuite is a very common word here. In fact most people seem to have an ensuite in their house! In new homes, they're standard. In older homes, people renovate to have them put in. There are some massive ones in new houses that are pretty much full bathrooms.

I'm a lefty too -- but I do have the knife in the right and the fork in the left. I feel funny eating without a utensil in both hands -- it'd be awkward to eat with just a fork!

As for other things -- I've always been amused by the American term "going to the bathroom". I remember when I was a kid, not understanding that they actually meant going to the toilet. Over here, it's always going to the toilet/loo/dunny whatever! Most people I know actually have their toilet separate to their bathroom, so going to the bathroom would imply that you're having a bath or a shower!

Of course, living in a shoebox of a flat, I have an ensuite bathroom to my only bedroom, and unfortunately it does have a toilet in it, instead of separate! (grrr!)

I would say that an ensuite is what would call a master bathroom, off the master bedroom, you know the one the adults in the house usually have as opposed to the kids.

And a room with just a toilet and sink would be called a half-bath.

Wordsmit2
March 29th, 2006, 03:03 PM
Essentially repeating KatG here: On American home and garden TV shows it's called a master bath.

Enormous and luxurious ones are apparently fashionable right now. Of course most people don't actually *know* anyone who has one that's any more than a glorified closet! (But it must be true, 'cause the TV says so. :P ;) )

KatG
March 29th, 2006, 07:12 PM
Essentially repeating KatG here: On American home and garden TV shows it's called a master bath.

Enormous and luxurious ones are apparently fashionable right now. Of course most people don't actually *know* anyone who has one that's any more than a glorified closet! (But it must be true, 'cause the TV says so. :P ;) )

I've actually cleaned houses for people who have the enormous, luxurious ones. The ones in the $500,000 and up homes in the swanky country/golf clubs, so they do exist, just not for your average, normal American.

Chrysalis
March 29th, 2006, 07:52 PM
I've actually cleaned houses for people who have the enormous, luxurious ones. The ones in the $500,000 and up homes in the swanky country/golf clubs, so they do exist, just not for your average, normal American.
This is a typical floorplan of the type of display homes you find in Australia at the moment, with ensuite, powder room, study, etc. http://www.dennisfamily.com.au/dfc/home/homes/executivehomes/amberleigh.sok

KatG
March 30th, 2006, 04:56 AM
This is a typical floorplan of the type of display homes you find in Australia at the moment, with ensuite, powder room, study, etc. http://www.dennisfamily.com.au/dfc/home/homes/executivehomes/amberleigh.sok

Okay. So I was right. The master suite/ensuite would be called a master bedroom/master bath here.

Wordsmit2
March 30th, 2006, 11:06 AM
On the one hand, these discussions are interesting. On the other hand, it reminds me of how irksome I find TV's fantasy way of life. People believe in this stuff.

Rose's apartment in Doctor Who is big, but at least it's cluttered and the camera work gives a cosy feel.

Are there any American TV shows on right now that realistically depict where people live? Even Law & Order has even the poorest characters living in enormous multi-room apartments. The most realistic dwellings you see are when the show goes to a town to do an exterior of a house.

ShimmeringStar
March 30th, 2006, 08:04 PM
I would say that an ensuite is what would call a master bathroom, off the master bedroom, you know the one the adults in the house usually have as opposed to the kids.

And a room with just a toilet and sink would be called a half-bath.
Yep. Here in Maryland to refer to a bedroom (master or otherwise) with an attached bath (full or half) as an "ensuite" would draw blank stares from most people.

Usually houses are described as (for ex.) a 4 bedroom 3 1/2 bath. Or if they're trying to emphasize the master suite (bedroom, full bath, walk-in closets) they'll mention the 'master bath'. :)

So bringing it back to topic... yes, if I read a fanfic and saw that room where one goes to 'do one's business' as an ensuite or a dunny, then yep, that'd be a tip-off that that person wasn't "talking American." ;) :)

Willow'sCat
March 31st, 2006, 10:39 PM
I am Australian and I use the term ensuite. I have to say it is more a middle class thing. I think it was also an eighties thing, until then most people either never had homes with them or they were just call the second toilet/bathroom.

So what is the term you guys (Americans/Canadians) use? I seemed to have missed the answer. :S

You wouldn't say I am going to use the 1/2 a bathroom, so what would you say? Oh and is it the same for both counties? I am thinking SGA here as its main characters are US/Canadian it would be nice to know if they use the same term.

Wordsmit2 it would be Rose's flat not apartment. ;) We say flat as well, oh and lift for elevator although the *sorry guys* dreaded Americanisation of my mother language is encroaching so I hear teenagers call it an elevator sometimes, I feel like yelling at them it's a lift. :mad: :p :D

Mr Prophet
March 31st, 2006, 11:36 PM
You wouldn't say I am going to use the 1/2 a bathroom, so what would you say?

But you wouldn't say 'I'm going to use the ensuite' either. Even in England, you'd only use ensuite to describe the room and probably even then only if you were trying to rent or sell it. Probably the most common usage would be in describing a hotel room with its own bathroom.

Chrysalis
April 1st, 2006, 12:55 AM
I am Australian and I use the term ensuite. I have to say it is more a middle class thing. I think it was also an eighties thing, until then most people either never had homes with them or they were just call the second toilet/bathroom.

So what is the term you guys (Americans/Canadians) use? I seemed to have missed the answer. :S

You wouldn't say I am going to use the 1/2 a bathroom, so what would you say? Oh and is it the same for both counties? I am thinking SGA here as its main characters are US/Canadian it would be nice to know if they use the same term.

Wordsmit2 it would be Rose's flat not apartment. ;) We say flat as well, oh and lift for elevator although the *sorry guys* dreaded Americanisation of my mother language is encroaching so I hear teenagers call it an elevator sometimes, I feel like yelling at them it's a lift. :mad: :p :D

Ugh! I want to scream every time I hear someone say apartment (how can they be APARTments when they're all stuck together? Someone explain that to me!).

As for elevator, I haven't heard kids say that, but that would drive me out of my mind, too! It's a lift, for crying out loud!

I agree with you about Americanisation of Australian English. It drives me to distraction.

EDIT: OMG! Another Carlton fan. Get ready for a season of pain....

Chrysalis
April 1st, 2006, 01:02 AM
So bringing it back to topic... yes, if I read a fanfic and saw that room where one goes to 'do one's business' as an ensuite or a dunny, then yep, that'd be a tip-off that that person wasn't "talking American." ;) :)

Hehe! That would be an Aussie fanfic, with a word like dunny!

Chrysalis
April 1st, 2006, 01:05 AM
But you wouldn't say 'I'm going to use the ensuite' either. Even in England, you'd only use ensuite to describe the room and probably even then only if you were trying to rent or sell it. Probably the most common usage would be in describing a hotel room with its own bathroom.

I've heard people use the word ensuite in conversation. As in at a big gathering of people, saying to the adults if they need to use the toilet, "use the ensuite", and leaving the other bathroom for the kids.

Major Clanger
April 1st, 2006, 05:09 AM
really? I only ever hear Americans avoid using the word toilet, or loo, or something.

I work with an American, and she keeps saying she's going to use the bathroom - I always tell her to take a soap and towel with her :D

Chrysalis
April 1st, 2006, 05:37 AM
really? I only ever hear Americans avoid using the word toilet, or loo, or something.

I work with an American, and she keeps saying she's going to use the bathroom - I always tell her to take a soap and towel with her :D

So funny! I worked with an American who was the same. Maybe it's something they're taught isn't polite or something. Maybe you're not allowed to say you're going to the toilet or something.

To me a bathroom is where you have a bath, or at the very least a shower. Toilets should ideally be in a separate room to the bathroom, in which case you wouldn't be able to 'go to the bathroom' in the bathroom anyway -- if you know what I mean!

Jynjyr
April 1st, 2006, 06:34 AM
In the area where I grew up and still live, middle-class homes (I've no idea about the 'posh' homes) have the toilet, sink and tub/shower in the same room. Hence the use of 'bathroom'.
As I was growing up, it would have been wonderful to have the shower in a separate area. 5 people + 1 bathroom = lots of yelling in the morning. Dad gave up and put a shower in the corner of the laundry room just so he could have a space in the morning. He and my brother went down there. The ladies got the 'real' bathroom.
If I'm in public, I use the term 'restroom' since you can't bathe there. In someone's home, it's 'bathroom'. Sometimes it's called a 'john' or a 'can'. Being really genteel, it's 'the Ladies room'. :)
Why is it called a 'loo'?

Major Clanger
April 1st, 2006, 12:58 PM
loo just seems to be short for lavatory.

The point about the bathroom is, that even in houses where I've lived where the toilet is in the bathroom, when I have just wanted to go for a pee, I've said toilet.

I can't conceive of any reason at all why I would call a room, with 3 cubicles, each of which contains only a toilet, and 3 sinks would be called anything approaching bathroom. ;)

It's one of those cute things Americans do I suppose.

If you're familiar with Edward Albee's Who's Afraid of Virginia Woolf they call it a Euphamism, I think. (It's been a while, they could have been talking about something else)

Chrysalis
April 1st, 2006, 01:39 PM
In the area where I grew up and still live, middle-class homes (I've no idea about the 'posh' homes) have the toilet, sink and tub/shower in the same room. Hence the use of 'bathroom'.
As I was growing up, it would have been wonderful to have the shower in a separate area. 5 people + 1 bathroom = lots of yelling in the morning. Dad gave up and put a shower in the corner of the laundry room just so he could have a space in the morning. He and my brother went down there. The ladies got the 'real' bathroom.
If I'm in public, I use the term 'restroom' since you can't bathe there. In someone's home, it's 'bathroom'. Sometimes it's called a 'john' or a 'can'. Being really genteel, it's 'the Ladies room'. :)
Why is it called a 'loo'?


Theories for why the toilet is called the loo:

1. It comes from the French term regardez l'eau which means 'watch out for the water'.

2. It comes from the French term le lieu, which means 'the place'.

3. It comes from the brand Waterloo, which was used on toilet cisterns early last century.

As for other terms, the popular Aussie term Dunny was originally used to describe an outside toilet, but people use the word for pretty much any toilet these days (though loo is much more common!)

dipsofjazz
April 1st, 2006, 02:03 PM
loo just seems to be short for lavatory.

If you look at this link (http://www.passports.com/trips/cityfact/cityfact.asp?city=Edinburgh) and read the third paragraph in the 'Old Town' section, you will read about 'gardez l'eau'. Until a few years ago, Edinburgh used a boat to dump sewage out into the sea, and the name of the boat was the 'Gardy Loo'.

Amanda Eros
April 1st, 2006, 03:11 PM
really? I only ever hear Americans avoid using the word toilet, or loo, or something.

I work with an American, and she keeps saying she's going to use the bathroom - I always tell her to take a soap and towel with her :D


Years ago the polite term for ladies to say was that they were going "to go powder my nose." So the bathroom was called the powder room because that's where ladies went to go powder their noses. Eventually women stopped powdering their noses, and the term switched to bathroom. It sounds less vulgar than "I'm going to go use the toilet." Or men saying, "I'm going to go use the Urinal." That really isn't an image one wants to have in their mind while they are out at a restaurant or at school.

Rooms that only contain a sink and a toilet are still called the powder room, however most people just call it a bathroom because it is just the common term to use. Parents pass it on to their kids, and their kids don't know any better.

Psychologically speaking as well, saying bathroom brings about an image of cleanliness in one's mind, where saying toilet does not.

Jynjyr
April 1st, 2006, 03:30 PM
Yes, I thought it may have something to do with "regardez-l'eau".

BTW - if you're really agile, you can bathe in the sink in a public restroom. I don't recommend it. :(

Chrysalis
April 1st, 2006, 06:05 PM
Yes, I thought it may have something to do with "regardez-l'eau".

BTW - if you're really agile, you can bathe in the sink in a public restroom. I don't recommend it. :(

There was a guy called Egor on Australian Big Brother who did that... I think it was him..

Wordsmit2
April 4th, 2006, 01:22 AM
Wordsmit2 it would be Rose's flat not apartment. We say flat as well, oh and lift for elevator although the *sorry guys* dreaded Americanisation of my mother language is encroaching so I hear teenagers call it an elevator sometimes, I feel like yelling at them it's a lift.

It seemed appropriate in the "Talking American" thread.


Ugh! I want to scream every time I hear someone say apartment (how can they be APARTments when they're all stuck together? Someone explain that to me!).

It's French, "appartement", derived in turn from Italian "appartamento".

Wordsmit2
April 4th, 2006, 01:31 AM
really? I only ever hear Americans avoid using the word toilet, or loo, or something.

I work with an American, and she keeps saying she's going to use the bathroom - I always tell her to take a soap and towel with her :D

The American concept is based on the *room*, not the *bath*. Does one ask where the mirror room is? If one did, that would open the bedrooms to use as well.

Wordsmit2
April 4th, 2006, 01:35 AM
Psychologically speaking as well, saying bathroom brings about an image of cleanliness in one's mind, where saying toilet does not.

Good point.

If someone for some reason exclaimed "This room looks like a bathroom!" it would be assumed the room in question was rather sterile looking and perhaps had a lot of tile. If someone exclaimed "This room looks like a toilet!", well, no one's going to imagine it's anything but a criticism.

Matt G
April 6th, 2006, 02:15 PM
So funny! I worked with an American who was the same. Maybe it's something they're taught isn't polite or something. Maybe you're not allowed to say you're going to the toilet or something.

To me a bathroom is where you have a bath, or at the very least a shower. Toilets should ideally be in a separate room to the bathroom, in which case you wouldn't be able to 'go to the bathroom' in the bathroom anyway -- if you know what I mean!

Oh I've IMed with Yanks who've LOLd when I say I'm going to the toilet. Just doesn't seem to be the done thing Stateside.

Jynjyr
April 6th, 2006, 04:04 PM
Oh I've IMed with Yanks who've LOLd when I say I'm going to the toilet. Just doesn't seem to be the done thing Stateside.
Nope, it isn't. :) The 'toilet' is the particular fixture that is in a 'bathroom'. Everyone knows what you're using in the 'bathroom', we just don't say so. *shrugs*

Wordsmit2
April 7th, 2006, 03:57 AM
Age is a factor too. American men above a certain age "use the john", "go to the crapper", etc. They probably wouldn't blink at "going to the toilet". But people of the TV era (about age 50 and below) either use the delicate terms used in television and movies--referring to the room instead of the purpose--or are very specific (e.g. "take a leak"). BTW, "need to pee" is probably not an American phrase (yet, anyway). It was used in Due South and Stargate SG-1, but those were both Canadian TV shows.

Hm. Some more American euphemisms that haven't been mentioned yet in this thread:

To go. (As in "But first I need to go." Or "Can it wait? I gotta go!")

Use the Gents' (or Ladies'). (But that's rare and a bit pretentious.)

*

Let's see. This discussion got started when someone wanted to know if "en suite" was an American phrase.

I had a great uncle in New York state who still had an outhouse "out back" in the 1970s. He had a vintage water closet toilet in an indoor lavatory too, but I don't remember what people called it. Actually, I think they *did* call it "the toilet".

KatG
April 7th, 2006, 07:02 AM
[QUOTE=Wordsmit2]Age is a factor too. American men above a certain age "use the john", "go to the crapper", etc. They probably wouldn't blink at "going to the toilet". But people of the TV era (about age 50 and below) either use the delicate terms used in television and movies--referring to the room instead of the purpose--or are very specific (e.g. "take a leak"). BTW, "need to pee" is probably not an American phrase (yet, anyway). It was used in Due South and Stargate SG-1, but those were both Canadian TV shows.

[QUOTE]

"need to pee" might be more common in the upper midwest. Hubs kids and grandkids all use it regularly, and they're from Chicago. RDA/Jack being from Chicago/Minnesota might account for it's usage in Stargate.

rarocks24
April 7th, 2006, 07:11 AM
Oh I can guarantee you this much...having really big bathrooms, especially in America is becoming very popular. We have enough room in ours to put a table, have both a shower stall (dual, there's two showerheads capable of fitting two people) and a bathtub, a seperate room where there's a toilet (though this I don't agree with, for the sole purpose of the germs that get on the door handle!).

Also, as for me, I was never taught and I use my left hand with my fork and my right hand with my knife. Same goes for the spoon. I just feel more comfortable using my left. I remember there were seperate styles between American and European. I think the zigzag pattern and the traditional is what they were called.

Major Clanger
April 7th, 2006, 08:16 AM
in Germany it's common to have a guest toilet, with a sink in it. No probs with handles there
:D

DEM
April 7th, 2006, 08:29 AM
I'm from Ohio, which is not the Upper Midwest, and I've known "need/have to pee" since, well, forever.

KatG
April 7th, 2006, 10:32 AM
in Germany it's common to have a guest toilet, with a sink in it. No probs with handles there
:D

That's a half bath here. 8)

bella
April 7th, 2006, 01:22 PM
As a Brit I'm finding this thread very informative and entertaining. I like the fact it very quickly got round to swearwords and toilets. :rolleyes:
The thing that gets me is the pronouncations. I've watched Star Trek since I was so-high and for years I thought re-rau-ting power and vayse were strange ST terms. It was only later I discovered they meant re-roo-ting power and varse! So they mean pathways and vessels to hold flowers. :o
And when I heard Marge say fanny in The Simpsons I was amazed they allowed such language.
But because of the popularity of US TV, films and pop music there is a creeping Americanization of the UK. For example, a girl I sat next to at a singing group always sang with an american accent despite the fact she's never left Europe. Mind you my northern sister is developing a Cockney accent from watching Eastenders (a London-set soap).

Major Clanger
April 8th, 2006, 06:30 AM
That's a half bath here. 8)
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
you're all just saying stuff like that to mess with my head!

Seshat
April 8th, 2006, 07:17 AM
Originally Posted by Gatetrixer
BTW, I'm pretty sure I saw one of SG(American) characters eating English style when using her fork.

Not remarkable. If she was stationed in Europe for some time, or if she's from an upper crust family, or if her parents sent her to one of those etiquette courses...

Or maybe she's practicing because she's planning a trip to France. :rolleyes: Hmmm...well, I'm American and none of those things mentioned and I've eaten that way (two-handed) my whole life. :) I've had people comment that it was the European way of eating, but I don't know, it just seemed more efficient somehow.

As for the toilet issue...as a kid we were taught that saying "I'm going to the toilet" was rude, one should instead say "I'm going to the bathroom," or worse "restroom", or even worse "use the facilities." One never even said the word toilet in polite company. :P

This is so ingrained in my brain that when I bought a house with a master bathroom that had a separate room for just the toilet I didn't know what to call the bitsy room. Does one call it the toilet room? That still sounds somehow vulgar to me, even after all these years! LOL :D What DOES one call the tiny little room with only a porcelaine god and nothing else??

Major Fischer
April 8th, 2006, 07:44 PM
As an adult I had to force myself to eat switch handed, my stepfather was Australian/English (his father was in the RAAF and a Battle of Britian fighter pilot who had married an english girl during the war) and because my mother never ate at the table I had naturally picked up his eating habit. Lots of reasons for an american to eat that way.

Major Fischer
April 8th, 2006, 07:51 PM
But because of the popularity of US TV, films and pop music there is a creeping Americanization of the UK. For example, a girl I sat next to at a singing group always sang with an american accent despite the fact she's never left Europe. Mind you my northern sister is developing a Cockney accent from watching Eastenders (a London-set soap).

My fiance is Canadian and she and I have been trading spellings of words subconciously... I have to double check all my papers to make sure i haven't put any errant "u" as in "honour"

Amanda Eros
April 8th, 2006, 09:44 PM
As a Brit I'm finding this thread very informative and entertaining. I like the fact it very quickly got round to swearwords and toilets. :rolleyes:
The thing that gets me is the pronouncations. I've watched Star Trek since I was so-high and for years I thought re-rau-ting power and vayse were strange ST terms. It was only later I discovered they meant re-roo-ting power and varse! So they mean pathways and vessels to hold flowers. :o
And when I heard Marge say fanny in The Simpsons I was amazed they allowed such language.
But because of the popularity of US TV, films and pop music there is a creeping Americanization of the UK. For example, a girl I sat next to at a singing group always sang with an american accent despite the fact she's never left Europe. Mind you my northern sister is developing a Cockney accent from watching Eastenders (a London-set soap).

As an American, I love hearing the British Accent. Basically anything said by a Brit will sound classy. :lol: One of my housemates, is from Germany, though she studied abroad in London, and then in New Zealand, but her accent! OMG, it sounds like she's from one of those two countires. It's interesting to listen to the different terms she uses. She calls "guys" "blokes," though after a few weeks she stopped. I love being able to see Dr. Who, and the different British shows on the home gardening networks. In American we don't use "That's fantastic!" Or "Brilliant!" When describing something that's amazing. We'll just say, "That's great! or Wow!" Though it is great that they can be interchangeable. You'll also never hear, "Fancy that! or "Bloody hell what did you do that for?" You'll more likely hear, "wow, I didn't know that!" or "what are you doing? or WTF!" but written out.

Chrysalis
April 9th, 2006, 03:53 AM
Oh I've IMed with Yanks who've LOLd when I say I'm going to the toilet. Just doesn't seem to be the done thing Stateside.
Hahaha! I love it! I've told them I'm just running off to the loo, and sometimes they're not sure what that is!
Then again, I used to work with a guy who used to say to me "I'll be back in a sec. Just going for a piss/slash". Yes, vulgar boy!

Chrysalis
April 9th, 2006, 04:04 AM
when I heard Marge say fanny in The Simpsons I was amazed they allowed such language.

I know exactly what you mean!! I think fanny is one of the very first naughty words kids learn in the UK and Australia! (for our American friends... well, fanny is something that girls have but boys don't, if you know what I mean!!)

The other thing that cracks me up is the American use of the word root. Here you don't wanna say you root for a football team. Root means the same thing as shag! Someone who's a slut is a root-rat.

One thing that I said in the UK that shocked my cousins there was a word that's perfectly normal here. I told my cousin that the number one movie at the time (1999) was called "Wog Boy", a movie about a Greek Australian. She went off at me and told me that I couldn't say the 'w' word. It means something totally different in Australia to what it means in the UK.

Jynjyr
April 9th, 2006, 09:19 AM
I know exactly what you mean!! I think fanny is one of the very first naughty words kids learn in the UK and Australia! (for our American friends... well, fanny is something that girls have but boys don't, if you know what I mean!!)

The other thing that cracks me up is the American use of the word root. Here you don't wanna say you root for a football team. Root means the same thing as shag! Someone who's a slut is a root-rat.

One thing that I said in the UK that shocked my cousins there was a word that's perfectly normal here. I told my cousin that the number one movie at the time (1999) was called "Wog Boy", a movie about a Greek Australian. She went off at me and told me that I couldn't say the 'w' word. It means something totally different in Australia to what it means in the UK.
:eek: O-KAY! *makes a note NOT to bring her 'fanny pack' if / when she goes to Europe again* I'm guessing the little pack that one wears around the waist is called a 'waist pack'?
I wear mine behind me, resting on my butt (AKA: fanny). OY!

I don't know why we call 'cheering' for a team 'rooting'. Unless it's because the sound, a lot of times, is 'roo - roo - rooo'. *shrugs*

Chrysalis
April 9th, 2006, 11:17 AM
:eek: O-KAY! *makes a note NOT to bring her 'fanny pack' if / when she goes to Europe again* I'm guessing the little pack that one wears around the waist is called a 'waist pack'?
I wear mine behind me, resting on my butt (AKA: fanny). OY!


It's a bum bag!!!

Incidentally, over here you barrack for a team, or support a team...

Matt G
April 9th, 2006, 03:25 PM
I'll use support if/when I hit Oz then.

Jynjyr
April 9th, 2006, 04:31 PM
It's a bum bag!!!

Incidentally, over here you barrack for a team, or support a team...
Of course it is. Maybe I'll start confusing my friends over here and start calling it that. They already think I talk weird.

Amanda Eros
April 9th, 2006, 04:36 PM
I know exactly what you mean!! I think fanny is one of the very first naughty words kids learn in the UK and Australia! (for our American friends... well, fanny is something that girls have but boys don't, if you know what I mean!!)

The other thing that cracks me up is the American use of the word root. Here you don't wanna say you root for a football team. Root means the same thing as shag! Someone who's a slut is a root-rat.

One thing that I said in the UK that shocked my cousins there was a word that's perfectly normal here. I told my cousin that the number one movie at the time (1999) was called "Wog Boy", a movie about a Greek Australian. She went off at me and told me that I couldn't say the 'w' word. It means something totally different in Australia to what it means in the UK.


OMG! I always thought that Fanny was a person's bum/bottom/but/a**.

Jynjyr
April 9th, 2006, 04:39 PM
OMG! I always thought that Fanny was a person's bum/bottom/but/a**.
Yeah! :o *crosses that word off her 'international' word list*

Chrysalis
April 9th, 2006, 05:43 PM
Yeah! :o *crosses that word off her 'international' word list*


There are soooo many words that are different between the countries. Even simple things. My friend and I were in Hawaii ordering Subway and we asked for capsicum. The person serving us looked at us blankly, and we had to point and say "the green stuff" and she said "oh, you want bell peppers".

KatG
April 10th, 2006, 08:51 AM
aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaa
you're all just saying stuff like that to mess with my head!

Well of course we are. ;)

Angel of Fire SG1
April 11th, 2006, 01:42 AM
Hahaha! I love it! I've told them I'm just running off to the loo, and sometimes they're not sure what that is!
Then again, I used to work with a guy who used to say to me "I'll be back in a sec. Just going for a piss/slash". Yes, vulgar boy!

LOL somewhere along the line of living in the bush for a year I picked up the word "Dunny"...you should see the looks I get when I say that one up here!! *grins innocently*

I have to stop myself and say 'bathroom' or 'washroom' now im in Canada though...


The other thing that cracks me up is the American use of the word root. Here you don't wanna say you root for a football team. Root means the same thing as shag! Someone who's a slut is a root-rat.


I'd root my football team :ronan: ...*blinks* Did I just say that out loud??


One thing that I said in the UK that shocked my cousins there was a word that's perfectly normal here. I told my cousin that the number one movie at the time (1999) was called "Wog Boy", a movie about a Greek Australian. She went off at me and told me that I couldn't say the 'w' word. It means something totally different in Australia to what it means in the UK.

What does is mean in UK language!?

Man I've noticed so many different things since coming to Canada lol!!

Aussie - Canadian

Car Park = Parking Lot
Lift = Elevator
Toilet = Washroom
Petrol = Gas (this one makes no sense to me...its a LIQUID not a gas...)
Beanie = Toque...Toook? I dunno I can't spell it LOL
Foot path = Side walk
Fizzy drink/soft drink = Pop
Jumper = Sweater
Runners = Sneakers

Meh its almost 2AM and I can't think anymore...but on top of the hundred little things like that there's just things they say like "For sure!" that we would say "Of course!" or "No problems mate" :P

We say "reckon" alot more....apparently that's farmers language here...

*finds it all very amusing* You'd reckon we'd all speak the same but we really don't...having been to the UK and now here (still have to make my way into the US that's next on the list) I'm really noticing the difference in language...

Angel of Fire SG1
April 11th, 2006, 02:02 AM
Ugh! I want to scream every time I hear someone say apartment (how can they be APARTments when they're all stuck together? Someone explain that to me!).

As for elevator, I haven't heard kids say that, but that would drive me out of my mind, too! It's a lift, for crying out loud!

I agree with you about Americanisation of Australian English. It drives me to distraction.

EDIT: OMG! Another Carlton fan. Get ready for a season of pain....

*laughs at Carlton supporter and then refrains from mentioning it further as this is not an AFL thread*

I actually have to admit to saying apartment...but I see a difference between an apartment and a flat. For example my incredibly rich uncle who owns this huuuuge 'flat' in Beacon Cove...well there's no way you can call his place a flat!! It's definately an apartment...

I see a distinct difference between the two. Flat = small and normal, apartment = big and luxurious...

But maybe that's just me.

And I love the word 'lift', its such a simple way to describe it. It lifts therefore its a 'lift'...although I guess it 'elevates' as well but that word's so much longer :daniel:

Jynjyr
April 11th, 2006, 09:27 AM
LOL somewhere along the line of living in the bush for a year I picked up the word "Dunny"...you should see the looks I get when I say that one up here!! *grins innocently*

I have to stop myself and say 'bathroom' or 'washroom' now im in Canada though...

<snip>
Petrol = Gas (this one makes no sense to me...its a LIQUID not a gas...)
<snip>

*finds it all very amusing* You'd reckon we'd all speak the same but we really don't...having been to the UK and now here (still have to make my way into the US that's next on the list) I'm really noticing the difference in language...
Gas = Gasoline (shortened because we Americans shorten everything (almost) and that term has migrated north.) :D I've no idea why 'gasoline' is called that.

Chrysalis
April 11th, 2006, 02:10 PM
LOL somewhere along the line of living in the bush for a year I picked up the word "Dunny"...you should see the looks I get when I say that one up here!! *grins innocently*

I have to stop myself and say 'bathroom' or 'washroom' now im in Canada though...




I'd root my football team :ronan: ...*blinks* Did I just say that out loud??


What does is mean in UK language!?

Man I've noticed so many different things since coming to Canada lol!!

Aussie - Canadian

Car Park = Parking Lot
Lift = Elevator
Toilet = Washroom
Petrol = Gas (this one makes no sense to me...its a LIQUID not a gas...)
Beanie = Toque...Toook? I dunno I can't spell it LOL
Foot path = Side walk
Fizzy drink/soft drink = Pop
Jumper = Sweater
Runners = Sneakers

Meh its almost 2AM and I can't think anymore...but on top of the hundred little things like that there's just things they say like "For sure!" that we would say "Of course!" or "No problems mate" :P

We say "reckon" alot more....apparently that's farmers language here...

*finds it all very amusing* You'd reckon we'd all speak the same but we really don't...having been to the UK and now here (still have to make my way into the US that's next on the list) I'm really noticing the difference in language...

Ummm. Okay, wog apparently is a word that they see as coming from gollywog, so you can probably see why it's politically incorrect. All I think of when I hear it is my Greek friend saying to me "first the wogs wanted to know when I was getting married, now they want to know why I haven't had kids yet". And she's talking about her own Greek community...

I used to work with a girl from California who said there was no way she could use the word reckon. She said she'd sound like a country hick or like someone off Jerry Springer if she did that! I reckon that's weird! (haha! Did you see that? Reckon use in sentence!!)

As for gas, even though I know it's short for gasoline, it irritates me because as you said, petrol is liquid, gas is... well, gas.

And you uncle with the apartment at Beacon Cove... ask him if he needs someone to leave all his money to!

Gatetrixer
April 12th, 2006, 10:43 PM
:eek: O-KAY! *makes a note NOT to bring her 'fanny pack' if / when she goes to Europe again* I'm guessing the little pack that one wears around the waist is called a 'waist pack'?
I wear mine behind me, resting on my butt (AKA: fanny). OY!

I don't know why we call 'cheering' for a team 'rooting'. Unless it's because the sound, a lot of times, is 'roo - roo - rooo'. *shrugs*

Let's all sing "Take Me Out to the Ballgame" and "root, root,root for the home team."

Gatetrixer
April 12th, 2006, 10:56 PM
In the area where I grew up and still live, middle-class homes (I've no idea about the 'posh' homes) have the toilet, sink and tub/shower in the same room. Hence the use of 'bathroom'.
As I was growing up, it would have been wonderful to have the shower in a separate area. 5 people + 1 bathroom = lots of yelling in the morning. Dad gave up and put a shower in the corner of the laundry room just so he could have a space in the morning. He and my brother went down there. The ladies got the 'real' bathroom.
If I'm in public, I use the term 'restroom' since you can't bathe there. In someone's home, it's 'bathroom'. Sometimes it's called a 'john' or a 'can'. Being really genteel, it's 'the Ladies room'. :)
Why is it called a 'loo'?

The "necessary room", originally the necessary, referring to an outhouse, the "facilities," the "little girls' room"(cutesy, huh) and one no one has probably heard of "the Kybo." There was a company that furnished those temporary outhouses to construction sites, large outdoor gatherings, etc. here for many years called the Kybo Co. It is no more but many us still refer to such as "Kybos."

Amanda Eros
April 13th, 2006, 09:06 PM
I got a quick question for people who are not from the United States. What do you call people from the United States, as compared to people from other parts of North, Meso/middle, and South America?

vaberella
April 13th, 2006, 10:41 PM
My nickname when I lived in London was Yankee...and most of my american friends now call me that, since I respond to it, and all of my European friends call me Yankee or Yank..which ever.

VB

LoneStar1836
April 13th, 2006, 11:03 PM
The "necessary room", originally the necessary, referring to an outhouse, the "facilities," the "little girls' room"(cutesy, huh) and one no one has probably heard of "the Kybo." There was a company that furnished those temporary outhouses to construction sites, large outdoor gatherings, etc. here for many years called the Kybo Co. It is no more but many us still refer to such as "Kybos."Nope, haven't heard that one. Around here they are called porta-jons or porta-johns or Port-a-Johns.....

Mr Prophet
April 14th, 2006, 01:58 AM
I got a quick question for people who are not from the United States. What do you call people from the United States, as compared to people from other parts of North, Meso/middle, and South America?

It's probably very wrong, but in Britain they're mostly called 'American', as opposed to Canadian, Mexican, Peruvian or anyone else from a country with an actual name. I guess we could try to popularise USAnian (Yoo-ess-ay-nee-an), but I don't see it taking off.

Yanks is the slang term, although that's not right either, since not all Americans are Yankees.

And portable toilets are called portaloos over here.

Major Tyler
April 14th, 2006, 06:44 AM
I got a quick question for people who are not from the United States. What do you call people from the United States, as compared to people from other parts of North, Meso/middle, and South America?For the U.S. and Canada, we say "North American," for Mexico and Central America we say "Latin America" (and just "Central America" if we're excluding Mexico), and for South America it's, strangely enough, "South American."

The general term for people from the United States is "American" largely because we are the only American country with the word "America" in our name. It sounds better than "United States-ian" plus evenyone else calls us "American," so we're going to stick with that.
It's probably very wrong, but in Britain they're mostly called 'American', as opposed to Canadian, Mexican, Peruvian or anyone else from a country with an actual name.It's not necessarily wrong if people know what you are talking about, but on this side of the ocean, at least, people will assume you mean the U.S.

Edit: LOL, I misread the question. Since most of the questions here are directed toward Americans, I thought Amanda was asking how people from the U.S. refer to others in continental America.

Sorry...I'll leave my post here in case it is in some way helpful.

Matt G
April 14th, 2006, 03:21 PM
Pretty sure USers got used as a short written form on Delphi era Gateworld at one point but I once used it on a current affairs board and got yelled at by a US right winger who said it was a derogatory term.

How paranoid was he being?

Major Clanger
April 14th, 2006, 03:51 PM
as a US right winger it's probably his job to be paranoid...

on another board I frequent we often call them USAians, and they don't seem to mind.

Chrysalis
April 14th, 2006, 06:18 PM
My nickname when I lived in London was Yankee...and most of my american friends now call me that, since I respond to it, and all of my European friends call me Yankee or Yank..which ever.

VB

At the risk of offending the Americans, and it's not meant to be offensive, people over here often refer to Americans as 'Septics'. It's from rhyming slang. Septic tank = Yank.

Chrysalis
April 14th, 2006, 06:30 PM
This is so ingrained in my brain that when I bought a house with a master bathroom that had a separate room for just the toilet I didn't know what to call the bitsy room. Does one call it the toilet room? That still sounds somehow vulgar to me, even after all these years! LOL :D What DOES one call the tiny little room with only a porcelaine god and nothing else??

We just call it the toilet. Pure and simple! The funny thing is, everyone talks about conservative British people. But we (I can say that, because I was born there, and grew up in an essentially English household) are a lot more open about those sort of things than Americans. It's funny because (correct me if I'm wrong) Americans use toilet humour, right? It seems a little weird to do that but not to want to say the word toilet.

Anyway, I guess the main reason people don't say they're going to the bathroom here is that in most cases, the toilet isn't in the bathroom. Unless you're talking about an ensuite. An ensuite will usually have a toilet, shower and basin. The main bathroom will have the bath, a shower and a basin (sometimes the shower is over the bath), but the toilet in the majority of cases is in a separate room.

northstar_08030
April 14th, 2006, 09:19 PM
If you think that hard to talk like an American with the difference between terms from country to country. We have another layer that one will have to get through, because here in the states, some region of the country have different terms for the same thing as well.

Here are the good example of that:

1.) Pop Soda - Fizzy Drink, for the non Ameicans, is refered as either Pop or Soda, depening which region of the nation that you are in. Me, I live in the Philly Metro Area, which refers to it as Soda. Now, when you go North, i.e. New York State, it is refered as Pop. Go to the midwest states it also known as Pop. Now, head to the Sourthern States, it also known as Pop, but when you get into the Georgia, it known as "Coke", and it dose not matter if it "Coke" or "Pepsi". Now, go to the West Coast, it refered to as Soda. Confussing? Yeah, I know, and that this is just one perfect example of that.

Oh yeah here is another one:

Jimmies/Sprinklers, if you don't know what they are, they are pure sugar topping that you can put on ice cream. Now, again where I live they are known as Jimmies, but you are in Seattle they are known as Sprinklers.

Chrysalis
April 15th, 2006, 05:41 AM
If you think that hard to talk like an American with the difference between terms from country to country. We have another layer that one will have to get through, because here in the states, some region of the country have different terms for the same thing as well.

Here are the good example of that:

1.) Pop Soda - Fizzy Drink, for the non Ameicans, is refered as either Pop or Soda, depening which region of the nation that you are in. Me, I live in the Philly Metro Area, which refers to it as Soda. Now, when you go North, i.e. New York State, it is refered as Pop. Go to the midwest states it also known as Pop. Now, head to the Sourthern States, it also known as Pop, but when you get into the Georgia, it known as "Coke", and it dose not matter if it "Coke" or "Pepsi". Now, go to the West Coast, it refered to as Soda. Confussing? Yeah, I know, and that this is just one perfect example of that.

Oh yeah here is another one:

Jimmies/Sprinklers, if you don't know what they are, they are pure sugar topping that you can put on ice cream. Now, again where I live they are known as Jimmies, but you are in Seattle they are known as Sprinklers.

There are different words for things in different states of Australia, too. Same thing in the UK.

As far as drink question goes, here it's soft drink. People don't use the term soda unless they're talking about soda water. Certainly don't say pop, either!

Major Tyler
April 15th, 2006, 10:06 AM
At the risk of offending the Americans, and it's not meant to be offensive, people over here often refer to Americans as 'Septics'. It's from rhyming slang. Septic tank = Yank.My friend Logan (he's American) went to Australia in high school for the "Down Under Bowl" or something, where they played football. He said he had an absolutely awful time there because the Australian guys called him a "Seppo" and treated him like crap for being from the U.S., and he wasn't just talking about the opposing team. People on the street would do this.

This was back in 1999, so I can't imagine how bad it would be now. :S He said the women treated him well because they liked his accent, but all the Aussie men would sneer at him...one of them even spit on him!

I don't want to assume that everyone in Australia would be like that, but I have to admit, I had the opportunity to visit Australia a couple summers ago, but after remembering Logan's story I chose to go to California instead.

jckfan55
April 15th, 2006, 10:14 AM
Some areas of the midwest US also call soft drinks "soda." And as for the "toilet" discussion--alyssa--I would say toilet "humor" is not for polite company. I always think of that as rather 8 year old humor. :)

jckfan55
April 15th, 2006, 10:17 AM
This isn't really relevant to writing, but relates to pronunciation. I was watching Dr. Who yesterday and one of the characters was supposed to be American & named Goddard. They pronounced it with the accent on the 2nd syllable. I happened to think Americans would probably be more likely to accent the first syllable. More like God-erd than God-ahrd. Just me?

DEM
April 15th, 2006, 10:27 AM
Not just you. However, if it were spelled 'Godard', I'd expect/say Go-DAhRd.

Trialia
April 15th, 2006, 10:30 AM
Hmm. That whole "bathroom" v "toilet" issue bugs me... because in my house-- which is definitely not middle class, it's a council flat-- the toilet and the bath are not in the same room.

Chrysalis
April 15th, 2006, 02:32 PM
My friend Logan (he's American) went to Australia in high school for the "Down Under Bowl" or something, where they played football. He said he had an absolutely awful time there because the Australian guys called him a "Seppo" and treated him like crap for being from the U.S., and he wasn't just talking about the opposing team. People on the street would do this.

This was back in 1999, so I can't imagine how bad it would be now. :S He said the women treated him well because they liked his accent, but all the Aussie men would sneer at him...one of them even spit on him!

I don't want to assume that everyone in Australia would be like that, but I have to admit, I had the opportunity to visit Australia a couple summers ago, but after remembering Logan's story I chose to go to California instead.

Hmmm. Seppo = septic tank. That's what I was talking about.

I've worked with quite a few Americans and none of them have had any real problems except for one girl, who actually admits that when she first arrived she was full of attitude about how she was from LA and we were just a little country town compared to that. She'd say we were just a pissy little country, and we'd be "well if that's what you think, why are you here??" She actually said "how do I stop people from being rude to me" and people said "tell them you're Canadian". BUT, I think that she brought some of it on herself for having such attitude (and it was appalling attitude!!) Australians will quickly cut people down if they're acting like they're superior. The British are the same -- we just won't cop that sort of thing.

I don't know what your friend was like, but that's what happened in this girl's case. She had a change of attitude and got along well with everyone.

Most Americans are fine, but there are a few who cop it because they have attitude, the same as any Aussies or Kiwis or anyone else who has attitude.

Actually, we probably give Kiwis a pretty hard time, but they give as good as they get! We're pretty irreverent about things..

Major Tyler
April 15th, 2006, 03:31 PM
Actually, we probably give Kiwis a pretty hard time, but they give as good as they get! We're pretty irreverent about things..LOL, I think that's the way it is with neighbors. My Canadian friends and I always rip on each other, but it's all in good fun. :D If I didn't make fun of you, then you should worry. ;)

As for Logan, he's one of the nicest guys I know, and I can't imagine him giving people attitude. He must have just had a run of bad luck that trip.

Chrysalis
April 15th, 2006, 03:44 PM
LOL, I think that's the way it is with neighbors. My Canadian friends and I always rip on each other, but it's all in good fun. :D If I didn't make fun of you, then you should worry. ;)

As for Logan, he's one of the nicest guys I know, and I can't imagine him giving people attitude. He must have just had a run of bad luck that trip.


We have a joke here "Why do New Zealand men marry women? Because sheep can't cook". I always thought that was hilarious, until I found out the South Africans say the same thing about Australian men!!

As for the seppo thing -- it's not that bad. Plenty of English people here get called "Pommy *******s", which I HATE, being originally from England. That's just the way Australians are. It doesn't mean they don't like you -- they just like to tease people!

LurkerLa
April 15th, 2006, 03:51 PM
If you think that hard to talk like an American with the difference between terms from country to country. We have another layer that one will have to get through, because here in the states, some region of the country have different terms for the same thing as well.

Here are the good example of that:

1.) Pop Soda - Fizzy Drink, for the non Ameicans, is refered as either Pop or Soda, depening which region of the nation that you are in. Me, I live in the Philly Metro Area, which refers to it as Soda. Now, when you go North, i.e. New York State, it is refered as Pop. Go to the midwest states it also known as Pop. Now, head to the Sourthern States, it also known as Pop, but when you get into the Georgia, it known as "Coke", and it dose not matter if it "Coke" or "Pepsi". Now, go to the West Coast, it refered to as Soda. Confussing? Yeah, I know, and that this is just one perfect example of that.

Oh yeah here is another one:

Jimmies/Sprinklers, if you don't know what they are, they are pure sugar topping that you can put on ice cream. Now, again where I live they are known as Jimmies, but you are in Seattle they are known as Sprinklers.
The soft drink/soda/pop thing has another angle, too. In some areas of the country they call everything "Coke." Once they've specified that they want a carbonated beverage with that word, you can get into specifics of Sprit, Mountain Dew, or whatever (I dunno - I don't drink soda).

Heh - I ask for Jimmies here in Ohio (where they're called sprinkles) because of my parents - both from the east coast. Some places know what I mean, some don't.

Any time you're trying to nail down a dialect in writing, though, it's going to be tough because of regionalisms - something every country has. When it comes to some of them - "pop" versus "soda" for example - I turned a blind eye, and just figure the character didn't spend his or her entire life in one region and might have picked up words in various places. It's only the words that aren't really used ANYWHERE in the country that tend to startle me, however briefly, out of the story.

Gatetrixer
April 15th, 2006, 06:12 PM
I got a quick question for people who are not from the United States. What do you call people from the United States, as compared to people from other parts of North, Meso/middle, and South America?


When I was studying Spanish, we were taught that Americans (from the USA) are "norteamericanos" to any person from the Spanish speaking countries of the Western Hemisphere. This is despite the fact that geographically North America starts with Central America and includes Canada.. They feel, "we are all Americans," not just those from the USA. There was also a word I saw somewhat like "estadienses"or "estadunienses" meaning sort of "United Staters," though I don't know if it is used much. Of course, I am from the USA, so in a way this question doesn't apply to me, and it's from the perspective of something studying Spanish not someone who is actually from a Spanish speaking country. (did have good teachers, though)
"

Gatetrixer
April 15th, 2006, 06:20 PM
The soft drink/soda/pop thing has another angle, too. In some areas of the country they call everything "Coke." Once they've specified that they want a carbonated beverage with that word, you can get into specifics of Sprit, Mountain Dew, or whatever (I dunno - I don't drink soda).

Heh - I ask for Jimmies here in Ohio (where they're called sprinkles) because of my parents - both from the east coast. Some places know what I mean, some don't.

Any time you're trying to nail down a dialect in writing, though, it's going to be tough because of regionalisms - something every country has. When it comes to some of them - "pop" versus "soda" for example - I turned a blind eye, and just figure the character didn't spend his or her entire life in one region and might have picked up words in various places. It's only the words that aren't really used ANYWHERE in the country that tend to startle me, however briefly, out of the story.


And then there's "soda pop." Or "sody." I live in the Midwest and call it either pop(usually) or soda. Actually, a soda is a delicious concoction of a flavoring, usually chocolate or strawberry, carbonated water, and ice cream, served in a tall tapered glass. Not so easy to find anymore, unless you happen to hit on an old fashioned soda fountain.

Chrysalis
April 15th, 2006, 10:02 PM
And then there's "soda pop." Or "sody." I live in the Midwest and call it either pop(usually) or soda. Actually, a soda is a delicious concoction of a flavoring, usually chocolate or strawberry, carbonated water, and ice cream, served in a tall tapered glass. Not so easy to find anymore, unless you happen to hit on an old fashioned soda fountain.


The carbonated drink and icecream -- in Australia (or at least the part of Australia I live in!) we call that a spider. Though I don't think it's used right across the country because someone I know from Sydney had no idea what I was talking about when I said I wanted a spider.

bella
April 16th, 2006, 08:13 AM
Jimmies/Sprinklers, if you don't know what they are, they are pure sugar topping that you can put on ice cream. Now, again where I live they are known as Jimmies, but you are in Seattle they are known as Sprinklers.
Sprinkles! The multi-coloured things you put on icecream, cakes etc. Is Jimmies a brandname, like vacum cleaner/Hoover?

Angel of Fire SG1
April 16th, 2006, 02:22 PM
The carbonated drink and icecream -- in Australia (or at least the part of Australia I live in!) we call that a spider. Though I don't think it's used right across the country because someone I know from Sydney had no idea what I was talking about when I said I wanted a spider.

I think in Canada they call it a "float" like a "root beer float" or whatever...

*wants a spider*

Matt G
April 16th, 2006, 03:36 PM
LOL, I think that's the way it is with neighbors. My Canadian friends and I always rip on each other, but it's all in good fun. :D If I didn't make fun of you, then you should worry. ;)

As for Logan, he's one of the nicest guys I know, and I can't imagine him giving people attitude. He must have just had a run of bad luck that trip.

Same current affairs board I mentioned earlier had a left wing Aussie who was very anti-American as in didn't own a TV as he didn't want to be exposed to US content. Accoring to him, the CIA once tried to manipulate an Aussie election in the mid 70s('75 I think was the year). How real that story is I don't know and I never got round to Googling, I take every story from current affairs nutters with a pinch of salt.

If there's any decent level of anti-US feeling that's probably the primary source, how widespread it is - dunno, you're better off asking the Aussies here.

Chrysalis
April 16th, 2006, 06:10 PM
Same current affairs board I mentioned earlier had a left wing Aussie who was very anti-American as in didn't own a TV as he didn't want to be exposed to US content. Accoring to him, the CIA once tried to manipulate an Aussie election in the mid 70s('75 I think was the year). How real that story is I don't know and I never got round to Googling, I take every story from current affairs nutters with a pinch of salt.

If there's any decent level of anti-US feeling that's probably the primary source, how widespread it is - dunno, you're better off asking the Aussies here.

Not necessarily anti-American as in American people, but anti-Bush, for sure. I used to work with a girl who had an American friend visiting her who called her all sorts of things including a Nazi because she was anti-Bush, and because people here were very vocal in their opposition to our own leader and to George W.

Over here, everyone says what they really think of leadership, whether it's ours or someone else's, that didn't go down well with her friend.

KatG
April 17th, 2006, 07:53 AM
I think in Canada they call it a "float" like a "root beer float" or whatever...

*wants a spider*

We call it a "float" in the Southeast US too.

Matt G
April 17th, 2006, 03:18 PM
Not necessarily anti-American as in American people, but anti-Bush, for sure. I used to work with a girl who had an American friend visiting her who called her all sorts of things including a Nazi because she was anti-Bush, and because people here were very vocal in their opposition to our own leader and to George W.

Over here, everyone says what they really think of leadership, whether it's ours or someone else's, that didn't go down well with her friend.

In other words - similar to the UK. Straight anti-Americanism has increased but anti-Bushism is much more common. I think I've only come accross one Brit in RL who backed the Iraq war.

Major Tyler
April 17th, 2006, 03:59 PM
In other words - similar to the UK. Straight anti-Americanism has increased but anti-Bushism is much more common. I think I've only come accross one Brit in RL who backed the Iraq war.Anti-Americanism as an outgrowth of anti-Bushism is really misplaced. I'd wager that for every one person in in UK that hates Bush, there is at least one person in the U.S. that does, too.

It's not like every American thinks Bush is great...most of us revile him. The only reason he won the election is because there were enough gullible people out of their minds with fear of terrorism to see him as the lesser of two undesirables.

The simple fact was that Bush was seen as the guy who would kill terrorists...period. People who feared terrorism above everything else (including the collapse of international goodwill, the loss of civil liberties, and the downfall of domestic prosperity) felt they had no real choice but Bush.

We had suffered a horrific attack, so I can't entirely say that I blame them. It's just too bad that not everyone could see the big picture. All I can say now is Thank God for term limits.

Additional Note to Americans: I fully recognize that some Americans agree with Bush. My statement was only meant to reflect those who would otherwise not agree with him, but were too scared not to vote for him when election day came. My point was to show our non-American friends here that hating the American people for the actions of President Bush is a stupid waste of energy.

ShimmeringStar
April 17th, 2006, 04:56 PM
I agree about the misplacing of feeling. It kind of reminds me of the "Ugly American" stereotype out there. Where we're all thought to be sloppy loud tourists with the loud tropical print shirts, baggie shorts and socks or very agressive and arrogant SOB's who see everything from a very narrow perspective.

When we're all unique individuals with some pretty varied backgrounds and differences. Kinda like this bulletin board, eh?

And I guess too it's the same as anywhere else... we may not respect the man in office, but we definitely respect the office/position itself.:)

And bringing back to topic....

Would y'all pronounce it Dub-YAAAH or Duuub-ya?

(how some refer to the younger George Bush currently in office):)

KatG
April 17th, 2006, 05:25 PM
And bringing back to topic....

Would y'all pronounce it Dub-YAAAH or Duuub-ya?

(how some refer to the younger George Bush currently in office):)

In the Southeast US it's Duuub-ya? Gotta give it that drawl ya know. :)

Chrysalis
April 17th, 2006, 05:44 PM
I agree about the misplacing of feeling. It kind of reminds me of the "Ugly American" stereotype out there. Where we're all thought to be sloppy loud tourists with the loud tropical print shirts, baggie shorts and socks or very agressive and arrogant SOB's who see everything from a very narrow perspective.

When we're all unique individuals with some pretty varied backgrounds and differences. Kinda like this bulletin board, eh?

And I guess too it's the same as anywhere else... we may not respect the man in office, but we definitely respect the office/position itself.:)

And bringing back to topic....

Would y'all pronounce it Dub-YAAAH or Duuub-ya?

(how some refer to the younger George Bush currently in office):)

Haha!!! That ugly American comment reminded me of a story in the local papers. Check it out: http://smh.com.au/news/world/a-quiet-word-to-loud-americans/2006/04/16/1145126007268.html

To be fair, I've only met nice Americans overseas, including once who said he could pick which part of Australia I was from from my accent. He was accurate, not just down to the state, but the actual city! Then again, there was a horribly loud family at a hotel I was in in Paris, where they were just --- I don't know, loud and obnoxious (I had nothing to do with them, which is why I don't include them with the other Americans I met), but the same can be said for people of any culture. Australians, stop wearing akubras overseas! You look like The Man from Snowy River!! Then there's the stereotype of the British in Ibiza. Not pretty... And being from England originally, not something I want to be associated with!!

Chrysalis
April 17th, 2006, 05:48 PM
In other words - similar to the UK. Straight anti-Americanism has increased but anti-Bushism is much more common. I think I've only come accross one Brit in RL who backed the Iraq war.


I think a lot of this has to do with different ideas of patriotism. The British and Australians are patriotic, but not so much so that we won't criticise our own governments. We're more patriotic when it comes to our sporting teams and national pride of winning sports events. Politicians? The government?? Meh... we can live without idolising them! And if people want to criticise them, go for it!!

Chrysalis
April 17th, 2006, 05:54 PM
I agree about the misplacing of feeling. It kind of reminds me of the "Ugly American" stereotype out there. Where we're all thought to be sloppy loud tourists with the loud tropical print shirts, baggie shorts and socks or very agressive and arrogant SOB's who see everything from a very narrow perspective.


I think part of the problem is that you people don't get enough annual leave. I've heard 2 weeks a year. Is that right? If so, that's appalling. Over here, the average Australian gets between 4 and 6 weeks of annual leave. This is why we travel more. Despite the fact we're 24 hours away from Europe (England is usually first stop for Australians. It's like a right of passage kind of thing --- off to London, either for a long holiday or to live for a couple of years...)

Two weeks off a year is not enough to get people travelling or seeing much of the world.

We've had American companies come in here and take over companies and try to cut holidays and ditch penalty rates for shift workers, and we won't cop that. That's about the time the unions come in threatening strike action.

My theory on the 'ugly American' phenomenon is that it would soon disappear if more Americans were able to travel for an extended amount of time.

Jynjyr
April 17th, 2006, 06:22 PM
I think part of the problem is that you people don't get enough annual leave. I've heard 2 weeks a year. Is that right? If so, that's appalling. Over here, the average Australian gets between 4 and 6 weeks of annual leave. This is why we travel more. Despite the fact we're 24 hours away from Europe (England is usually first stop for Australians. It's like a right of passage kind of thing --- off to London, either for a long holiday or to live for a couple of years...)

Two weeks off a year is not enough to get people travelling or seeing much of the world.

We've had American companies come in here and take over companies and try to cut holidays and ditch penalty rates for shift workers, and we won't cop that. That's about the time the unions come in threatening strike action.

My theory on the 'ugly American' phenomenon is that it would soon disappear if more Americans were able to travel for an extended amount of time.
I'm from Ohio (north-east-central? US, Great Lakes region). At the company I work for, the longer the length of service the more vacation time available. I've been with the company for 28 years and get 5 weeks. However, we're not allowed to take more than 2 weeks at a time (10 work days).
A couple of years ago, I went to Vancouver for GateCon. They refused to let me take 10.5 days of vacation. They actually EXPECTED me to fly from Van to Cleveland (leave Van at 0700, arrive Cleve at 1230, with 3 hours time diff.) and come to work that afternoon. I basically told them to "P**S OFF".
Unfortunately, that seems to be the prevailing standard to which companies work.

The times I have traveled to Europe (Germany and the Slovak Republic), I've found people as polite to me as I was to them. I tried to be a well-behaved guest in their home country. The rude and obnoxious get treated rudely in return.
A perfect stranger at the Brataslava train station took me under her wing and made sure I got on the correct train. Thank God. I don't speak a word of Slovak.

Major Tyler
April 17th, 2006, 06:58 PM
Haha!!! That ugly American comment reminded me of a story in the local papers. Check it out: http://smh.com.au/news/world/a-quiet-word-to-loud-americans/2006/04/16/1145126007268.htmlThis article has sensible recommendations for anyone traveling to a different country than their own. It's good.
The times I have traveled to Europe (Germany and the Slovak Republic), I've found people as polite to me as I was to them. I tried to be a well-behaved guest in their home country. The rude and obnoxious get treated rudely in return.
A perfect stranger at the Brataslava train station took me under her wing and made sure I got on the correct train. Thank God. I don't speak a word of Slovak.Have you been to Prague? When I spend my fall semester in Brussels, Prague is definitely one of the first places I want to visit in Europe.

It's going to be a bear trying to learn so many languages, but it will be totally worth it! I'm hoping to have at least functional French before I get to Belgium...I know Spanish pretty well, and I have all summer to learn, so I should be okay.

ShimmeringStar
April 17th, 2006, 08:36 PM
This article has sensible recommendations for anyone traveling to a different country than their own. It's good.*laughs* It's good even for traveling in-country. :)

In response to alyssa:
There are millions in our country who don’t get any vacation time except federal holidays. (And if they work retail nearly all major chains are open on most of those holidays.) Those are the multitude who work less than full-time (40 hours a week normally). And so many people don’t stay with one company or organization as long as Jynjyr (28 years) or myself have (16 years) to earn the higher amounts of leave. I’m earning 5 weeks a year like she is. (When I started it was 2 weeks a year for new employees). (And lucky me – I can “rollover” or “bank” 10 weeks a year of accumulated leave – most people – newer staff, aren’t allowed to.) And as Jynjyr pointed out, you may have the leave to take, but can’t/don't get to use it.

But I think costs may be an even greater issue. I know when I bought my ticket for GABIT for November the pound was getting near twice the dollar. (£1 to $1.80) So while a hotel room looks mighty good at £70 when I see it’s really going to cost me $140 it’s :eek: time! If exchange rates are closer or equal more people probably would be more likely to do an out-of-country vacation than an in-country one.

I wonder too if size is a factor. (So many more of us running around so that people with certain personality traits are more noticeable. That loud American at one table maybe surrounded by others at other tables, but you wouldn’t notice the rest of us since we’re doing our best to blend in with the locals and enjoy the ambiance!) The US has close to 300 million people living in it. There are states in it that are larger in size than many European countries. Heck, I live in Maryland – at 5 million it’s nearly the population of each of the Nordic countries and larger in pop. than New Zealand and Ireland (4 million each). The combined pops of California and Texas are nearly the pop of the UK (60 million)...
Germany 82 m
France & UK 60m each
Australia 20m
California 35 m
Florida 17m
Illinois 12 m
Texas 22m
New York 19m
Pennsylvania 16m

Chrysalis
April 18th, 2006, 08:11 AM
*laughs* It's good even for traveling in-country. :)

In response to alyssa:
There are millions in our country who don’t get any vacation time except federal holidays. (And if they work retail nearly all major chains are open on most of those holidays.) Those are the multitude who work less than full-time (40 hours a week normally). And so many people don’t stay with one company or organization as long as Jynjyr (28 years) or myself have (16 years) to earn the higher amounts of leave. I’m earning 5 weeks a year like she is. (When I started it was 2 weeks a year for new employees). (And lucky me – I can “rollover” or “bank” 10 weeks a year of accumulated leave – most people – newer staff, aren’t allowed to.) And as Jynjyr pointed out, you may have the leave to take, but can’t/don't get to use it.

But I think costs may be an even greater issue. I know when I bought my ticket for GABIT for November the pound was getting near twice the dollar. (&#163;1 to $1.80) So while a hotel room looks mighty good at &#163;70 when I see it’s really going to cost me $140 it’s :eek: time! If exchange rates are closer or equal more people probably would be more likely to do an out-of-country vacation than an in-country one.

I wonder too if size is a factor. (So many more of us running around so that people with certain personality traits are more noticeable. That loud American at one table maybe surrounded by others at other tables, but you wouldn’t notice the rest of us since we’re doing our best to blend in with the locals and enjoy the ambiance!) The US has close to 300 million people living in it. There are states in it that are larger in size than many European countries. Heck, I live in Maryland – at 5 million it’s nearly the population of each of the Nordic countries and larger in pop. than New Zealand and Ireland (4 million each). The combined pops of California and Texas are nearly the pop of the UK (60 million)...
Germany 82 m
France & UK 60m each
Australia 20m
California 35 m
Florida 17m
Illinois 12 m
Texas 22m
New York 19m
Pennsylvania 16m

That holiday situation is appalling. It wouldn't be tolerated here. I started in my first job at 21 with 6 weeks of holidays. I could have taken all six weeks at once if I wanted to. You have the holidays, and you're entitled to take them whenever you want, provided your boss can cover you. We have rather militant unions here, and we have a lot of rights (then again, I live in the only city in the world where we have a public holiday for a horse race.... maybe we go a bit overboard!!) No more than 10 days in a row just wouldn't be tolerated here, I can promise you that.

If you want to find Australians, go to London. The place is crawling with them. Seriously. You'll find stacks of Kiwis there, too.

I'm always amazed at the population of the US. It's incredible to me, living in a country around the same size geographically with a population of 20 million! Then again, most of our country you wouldn't want to live in because it's desert and in some parts of that desert it's not that unusual to get up to 40-50 degrees (that's about 104-122 fahrenheit) at some times of the year and people just don't want to live there (just a few brave souls and lots of wild camels!) Plus we already have water restrictions in most of our major cities, so we're pretty close to capacity as far as the number of people we can support! (Eg. of water restrictions, my mum, who lives in country Victoria, is allowed to water her garden three times a week and only between 7pm and 8pm on those days. Lots of places have signs saying that they use recycled water, so that they don't get in trouble from local councils, etc)

Jynjyr
April 18th, 2006, 05:22 PM
Our 'No more than 10 days' rule started a few years ago. Just because 2/3 of the office staff had 5 weeks of vacation and took the whole month of December off. :) I admit, I was one of them. I took 3 weeks. Our boss's boss had a cow when he did one of his rare walk throughs and realized almost all the desks were vacant. :(

Parts of the US have water restrictions, too. I'm lucky enough to live within 20 miles of the largest source of freshwater in the world. The Great Lakes. http://www.great-lakes.net/teach/geog/intro/intro_1.html Even then, in certain summers, we've had water restrictions.

jckfan55
April 18th, 2006, 05:33 PM
I think in Canada they call it a "float" like a "root beer float" or whatever...

*wants a spider*
that's what we've always called them in our family and we're not from Canada. Mmm, root beer floats... (note to self: must buy vanilla ice cream) :)

KatG
April 19th, 2006, 08:49 AM
that's what we've always called them in our family and we're not from Canada. Mmm, root beer floats... (note to self: must buy vanilla ice cream) :)

Mmmm. Root beer floats.

And growing up in Atlanta, you know we had to have Coke floats. In fact I didn't know there was any other kind until I got to be a teen-ager. 8)

Jynjyr
April 19th, 2006, 09:12 AM
They're also very good when made with Orange soda, or Strawberry soda. My favorite is Root beer with good French vanilla ice cream.

Chrysalis
April 19th, 2006, 01:48 PM
They're also very good when made with Orange soda, or Strawberry soda. My favorite is Root beer with good French vanilla ice cream.

Lime spiders are especially popular here.

mentalmichael
April 19th, 2006, 01:58 PM
I'm always amazed at the population of the US. It's incredible to me, living in a country around the same size geographically with a population of 20 million!

Hey, you want to talk about high populations then just look at the UK! 75 million (ish) squeezed onto an island less than half the size of California. Compared to here America is empty.

Major Zoidberg
April 19th, 2006, 02:04 PM
i thought it was 60 million :S

But i agree this countrys over crowded, maybey its time to emigrate :rolleyes:

immhotep
April 19th, 2006, 02:06 PM
yeah you make a great point, Britain must be the most overcrowded place in europe, i think its a credit to us that we dont suffer from drastic overcrowding and shortages of everything!

Major Zoidberg
April 19th, 2006, 02:08 PM
well i don't think this country will last much longer :( Lets all emigrate to canada, they have a labour shortage ;)

immhotep
April 19th, 2006, 02:14 PM
i have considered it, but then id have to be a $$$$$ guy and i just love the &#163; sign too much, plus the weather is worse than here, which is saying alot!

Major Zoidberg
April 19th, 2006, 02:18 PM
hey look on the bright side, i used to know some canadian. He said they actuarly have winters up there. When was the last time we had a propper winter over here? :(

i don't mind the $ :)

immhotep
April 19th, 2006, 02:21 PM
are you kidding me! were becoming a two season climate, the summer lasted til november sure but the winter isnt over yet and its nearly may, it snowed 3 days ago! it hailed today!

Major Zoidberg
April 19th, 2006, 02:46 PM
we're just....do we have wether in this country? rainy an miserable. I'l take cold an snowy over that anyday *hates rain* :(

Matt G
April 19th, 2006, 03:32 PM
Anti-Americanism as an outgrowth of anti-Bushism is really misplaced. I'd wager that for every one person in in UK that hates Bush, there is at least one person in the U.S. that does, too.

It's not like every American thinks Bush is great...most of us revile him. The only reason he won the election is because there were enough gullible people out of their minds with fear of terrorism to see him as the lesser of two undesirables.

The simple fact was that Bush was seen as the guy who would kill terrorists...period. People who feared terrorism above everything else (including the collapse of international goodwill, the loss of civil liberties, and the downfall of domestic prosperity) felt they had no real choice but Bush.

We had suffered a horrific attack, so I can't entirely say that I blame them. It's just too bad that not everyone could see the big picture. All I can say now is Thank God for term limits.

Additional Note to Americans: I fully recognize that some Americans agree with Bush. My statement was only meant to reflect those who would otherwise not agree with him, but were too scared not to vote for him when election day came. My point was to show our non-American friends here that hating the American people for the actions of President Bush is a stupid waste of energy.


You're preaching to the choir here mate. Anti-Americanism does seem to be considered fairer game than most other prejudices here though. Admittedly a large part of it is due to pre-existing anti-Americans taking advantage of a dodgy situation - generally a case of people listening to those who are yelling loudest. That's stupid but bear in mind that the average Brit is a reality TV and celebrity culture fan who's pretty ignorant about politics. ;)

Major Zoidberg
April 19th, 2006, 03:52 PM
Is this the hate the british thread? :(

We're not all bad, the reason we have a goverment stupid enough to be Bush's lapdog is that they have good economic policy's, an the last goverment was even worse.

The war in iraq is nothing compared to the falklands war :S

And that the brit you think of as average probably dosn't vote, we have low turnout in this country. Sorry for preaching :(

i don't think of amercians as morons for voteing for bush, i can understand you need to be carefull about your oil exports from abroad :S

Chrysalis
April 19th, 2006, 08:04 PM
Is this the hate the british thread? :(

We're not all bad, the reason we have a goverment stupid enough to be Bush's lapdog is that they have good economic policy's, an the last goverment was even worse.

The war in iraq is nothing compared to the falklands war :S

And that the brit you think of as average probably dosn't vote, we have low turnout in this country. Sorry for preaching :(

i don't think of amercians as morons for voteing for bush, i can understand you need to be carefull about your oil exports from abroad :S

Hey, I like the British! As for Bush, I don't know what their turnout rate was from the last election, but you'd think that the crap that went on in his first term would be enough to spur people on to vote. What worries me is that the leader of the US is rightly or wrongly seen as the leader of the free world. It actually kind of pisses me off. There's no way the rest of the world would vote for him --- I'm hoping that the next president can actually string a sentence together. There's a poster that someone's put up on a billboard near where I live and it's a caricature of Bush snorting cocaine and it says "not all cocaine addicts are beautiful". I can't imagine how much trouble there'd be if someone did that in the US.

On the topic of voting, it's compulsory here. If you don't vote, they fine you. Everyone over 18 must register to vote, and must vote in state and federal elections.

Major Tyler
April 19th, 2006, 08:07 PM
On the topic of voting, it's compulsory here. If you don't vote, they fine you. Everyone over 18 must register to vote, and must vote in state and federal elections.Compulsory voting scares me. I'd rather give uninterested/uneducated people the option not to vote, rather than have the election skewed by people voting for "whomever" because they really don't care.

captainpash
April 19th, 2006, 08:59 PM
Good point Tyler, but is it talking americain? I mean is it really?

Major Tyler
April 19th, 2006, 09:36 PM
Good point Tyler, but is it talking americain? I mean is it really?Actually, it's "Talking American"...not Americain.

OakRidge
April 19th, 2006, 11:02 PM
Compulsory voting scares me. I'd rather give uninterested/uneducated people the option not to vote, rather than have the election skewed by people voting for "whomever" because they really don't care.

Bush was voted back into office for the simple reason that it was wartime. A president has neven been voted out of office during the middle of a war. If there was no war, not terrorist attacks, etc he would have most likely been a one term president.

L.A. Doyle
April 20th, 2006, 12:23 AM
I speak American and Texan! :p It really drives me crazy when I read fics that have all these British or other terms that I don't know. Argh! When I write I try and be sure I don't put anything that I couldn't imagine a character saying. Even though I say y'all, I'd never put it in a fic!

Major Zoidberg
April 20th, 2006, 05:39 AM
Hey, I like the British! As for Bush, I don't know what their turnout rate was from the last election, but you'd think that the crap that went on in his first term would be enough to spur people on to vote. What worries me is that the leader of the US is rightly or wrongly seen as the leader of the free world. It actually kind of pisses me off. There's no way the rest of the world would vote for him --- I'm hoping that the next president can actually string a sentence together. There's a poster that someone's put up on a billboard near where I live and it's a caricature of Bush snorting cocaine and it says "not all cocaine addicts are beautiful". I can't imagine how much trouble there'd be if someone did that in the US.

On the topic of voting, it's compulsory here. If you don't vote, they fine you. Everyone over 18 must register to vote, and must vote in state and federal elections.

You do :eek: Makes you miss clinton. He was much more of a diplomat. How does trudgeing your army into a country who's sworn a jihad smart? the guys dangerous. And now he's in command of the worlds most powerful army an effective nuclear aresenal *headesk* An i agree with you about stupid people voteing!

The conservative goverment (in this country) makes grand promise's about low taxes, lucky the people who do vote know what happened last time they were in power. I think i may vote (i'll be old enough next time) alot of people died to give you that right. But makeing it compulsory? wouldn't that be just as bad?

why did he get voted for in america? (notcies we have americans whos seem to have some brains between their ears on the thread) ;)

I swear if a conservative goverment ever comes to power again i'm emigrateing LOL :S

sorry for my terrible spelling, i only just got out of bed :o

Chrysalis
April 20th, 2006, 06:01 AM
Compulsory voting scares me. I'd rather give uninterested/uneducated people the option not to vote, rather than have the election skewed by people voting for "whomever" because they really don't care.

People can still either do a donkey vote or an informal vote. People who really don't care will just not mark all the boxes on the ballot paper.
Also, if people have to vote, they can't complain about the outcome.

Major Zoidberg
April 20th, 2006, 06:08 AM
No offense alyssa but your goverment sounds a little mean :(

bella
April 20th, 2006, 06:14 AM
Just be careful. Political discussions are usually flamebait.

LurkerLa
April 20th, 2006, 06:26 AM
Just be careful. Political discussions are usually flamebait.
That's very true - we should probably try to keep the political discussion to a minimum, especially as it technically is off-topic for this thread, which was created to help writers from other countries who wanted to make sure their characters were using the appropriate slang and colloquialisms.

Not that I don't find discussions of language differences around the world generally interesting. :)

Major Zoidberg
April 20th, 2006, 06:47 AM
I'm suprised thsi thread isn't a warzone already :S

so i'll just shut my big fat pie hole ;)

*runs away*

Mr Prophet
April 20th, 2006, 09:54 AM
I swear if a conservative goverment ever comes to power again i'm emigrateing LOL :S

We've had a conservative government for the last two terms.

On topic, can someone help me out with the American term for the kid who always worked hard at school. In England it would be swot (or, in most of the schools I went to, Mr Prophet), but what would the US equivalent be?

LurkerLa
April 20th, 2006, 10:01 AM
We've had a conservative government for the last two terms.

On topic, can someone help me out with the American term for the kid who always worked hard at school. In England it would be swot (or, in most of the schools I went to, Mr Prophet), but what would the US equivalent be?
Well, if you're just looking for someone who studied hard you might call him/her a nerd. Less likely might be bookworm. And someone who's a good student AND well liked by the teachers would be a teacher's pet. They might be the ones who throw off the curve by always getting good grades even when everyone else is having trouble.

Helpful?

Major Zoidberg
April 20th, 2006, 11:08 AM
I'd say nerd not...a swot :ronananime25:

socila retard/re-ject might also be good ;)

LurkerLa
April 20th, 2006, 01:06 PM
I'd say nerd not...a swot :ronananime25:

socila retard/re-ject might also be good ;)
Only if you want to insult those of us who were nerds in school. :P

Major Zoidberg
April 20th, 2006, 01:28 PM
I AM a nerd an a social reject ;)

Having trouble admiting your nerdy past? ;)

Major Tyler
April 20th, 2006, 01:48 PM
I'd say nerd not...a swot :ronananime25:

socila retard/re-ject might also be good ;)The only word that comes to mind is "scrub."

Chrysalis
April 20th, 2006, 02:39 PM
Only if you want to insult those of us who were nerds in school. :P

I think that the majority of people who post on GW would have been nerds at school! Nerds with great intellects, of course.....

Major Zoidberg
April 20th, 2006, 03:12 PM
I'm a nerd but i'm of no great intellect, just look at my spelling :ronananime25: *hangs head in shame*

Matt G
April 20th, 2006, 03:20 PM
Is this the hate the british thread? :(

We're not all bad, the reason we have a goverment stupid enough to be Bush's lapdog is that they have good economic policy's, an the last goverment was even worse.

The war in iraq is nothing compared to the falklands war :S

And that the brit you think of as average probably dosn't vote, we have low turnout in this country. Sorry for preaching :(

i don't think of amercians as morons for voteing for bush, i can understand you need to be carefull about your oil exports from abroad :S

*points MZ to location tag*

OK, what's your idea of the average Brit?*looks nervously at mods*

LurkerLa
April 20th, 2006, 03:21 PM
I AM a nerd an a social reject ;)

Having trouble admiting your nerdy past? ;)
Oh no! I was, and still am, a nerd. (I got six books on the history of English out from the library just other day - for fun! If that's not nerdy...)

But I resent the implication that I must have been a social reject! :P I actually enjoyed the social aspect of school, enough so that I sometimes miss it... :D


The only word that comes to mind is "scrub."
For me "scrub" seems to imply a more of a slacker or freeloader than someone who worked hard in school.

Major Zoidberg
April 20th, 2006, 03:23 PM
I was refering to what the world thought of us...they all think we're either tea drinking snobs with posh accents or chavs/neds :(

ShimmeringStar
April 20th, 2006, 05:45 PM
Well, if you're just looking for someone who studied hard you might call him/her a nerd. Less likely might be bookworm. And someone who's a good student AND well liked by the teachers would be a teacher's pet. They might be the ones who throw off the curve by always getting good grades even when everyone else is having trouble.

Helpful?
Geek would be another adjective. But then Mr. P, that begs the question of how old is the person who is calling said person this name? Bookworm would be one generation's derogatory term while nerd/geek would be the next's. (Like those of us who were in our teens/early 20's in the '80's.) *looks around thread* Any U.S. teens lurking about who know what the latest buzzwords are?:rolleyes: