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View Full Version : Did Sheppard act with permission of the SGC?



blue-skyz
December 9th, 2007, 08:31 AM
IMO Sheppard had to have permission from his superiors to allow Wallace to sacrifice himself.

The SGC is high security facility.

Sheppard had to get permission to have the Wraith brought to the SGC. No one can be snuck through the stargate without it being recorded and brought to the attention of the person in charge, usually Landry, especially not a high profile and dangerous prisoner like the Wraith. Sheppard would be in the brig if he had tried to sneak the Wraith in without permission.

The SGC would have instituted very tight security measures to contain the Wraith. Part of that security can be seen in the choice of room as a lab for the Wraith to work in. There are at least two large windows in one wall of that room. When the Wraith collapses, two guards can be seen in the room behind the windows, one of them picks up a phone and talks to someone. These same windows can be seen when McKay walks into the lab and watches Wallace’s body being wheeled out.

There are probably security cameras in the room used as a lab, as well.

In the lab, itself, there are some SGC guards (at least one) with the Wraith. There are two more guards with the Wraith who are probably Sheppard’s men, the ones who brought the Wraith through the gate. There is an SGC guard outside the door to the lab.

Sheppard is important on Atlantis but in the SGC he’s just a Lieutenant Colonel. There would usually be some number of colonels there and a general (Landry). Someone from the SGC would be given responsibility for the security of the Wraith’s presence on base. Sheppard is a visitor there and is focused on the overall reason for the Wraith’s presence. He is, however, the available expert on the Wraith so he would be participating in security.

Sheppard could not have taken Wallace into the lab without being observed. Even if he could have ordered the guards out of the lab, there could have been no reason to order them out of the observation room. He could not have disabled any security cameras without being detected. Therefore, he would have either been in full view of SGC personnel or his actions would have been so suspicious as to call attention to the situation.

Two conclusions are possible from the lack of privacy issue alone: Sheppard had permission/orders to do what he did or he had decided to sacrifice his career and possibly his freedom to keep McKay alive and the Wraith working on the Replicator attack code.

Sheppard would have identified the need to keep McKay away from the Wraith, but he wouldn’t have the capability or the authority to revoke his access privileges. Someone with more authority in the SGC had to do that for him and he had to provide them with a credible reason for it.

Sheppard made no attempt to hide any deception when he told McKay what would be in the report of the incident. He told him in a room with, at least, five other people in it, two more in the observation room, presumably with microphones in the lab, and in full view of whatever cameras are present.

Sheppard’s ‘the Wraith got lose’ story would have been a joke to his superiors in the SGC. No one would have believed it. There is too much security and too many witnesses. Sheppard would never have even considered writing such a report unless he knew that it would be approved. The story could have been made plausible for those outside the SGC.

Allowing a man to commit suicide by being killed by a dangerous prisoner is very bad. Allowing a man to be killed by a dangerous prisoner because of your negligence is only marginally better. We don’t actually know who was responsible for the Wraith in the SGC, besides Sheppard, so we don’t know who would get blamed for the negligence. But, apparently, it was the negligence story that went into the report. Negligence with some version of ‘Gosh, no one had any idea how strong the Wraith could be when he was desperate to feed.’

Explaining Wallace’s presence in the lab is another matter. Wallace’s company had been working on nanite programming, so some story would be possible. Wallace could have been in the lab as a consultant or Sheppard could have been trying to convince him to help out by showing him the lab. Permission for this from the NID or the SGC should have been easy enough to obtain. Maybe the SGC would be suspicious as to the amount of help Wallace could be, but outside the SGC the story could be made plausible.

The most likely scenario is that Sheppard had permission from his superiors to allow Wallace to sacrifice himself. Just as Sheppard had to tell Wallace the situation so that he could save Jeannie’s life, he had to tell General Landry, O’Neill, or someone the situation so that he could take Wallace to the Wraith and let him feed without interference. Wallace would have had to convince the SGC that he wanted to sacrifice himself to keep his victim, Jeannie, from dying and to save her family. Since there are other benefits to keeping the Wraith alive, saving the Pegasus humans among them, I doubt that it was too hard for the pragmatic SGC to make the decision to allow Wallace do it. Thus Sheppard would have the permission he requested.

IMO, the SGC would make that decision, but they would not want to have to justify it to those lacking the perspective that the stargate has provided. So, like Woolsey, they would prefer the report to reflect a less controversial version of the circumstances i.e., ‘the Wraith got loose.’

Outside the SGC the circumstances of the Wraith’s confinement would be unknown. Even if the report looked fishy, it is unlikely that more would come of it.

IMO, Sheppard did not act alone. He would not have been able to allow the Wraith to feed on Wallace in secret. There is too much oversight by the SGC. The ‘official’ version of the incident that Sheppard tells McKay is the version the SGC wants reported. If Sheppard acted alone, without permission, he would be awaiting disciplinary action, not reading comic books in Atlantis.

Sheppard does, however, assume the responsibility and the moral baggage that goes with it.



btw, for the purposes of this argument, I am not Landry (court martial thread) ;)

IlluZen
December 11th, 2007, 11:28 AM
IMO Sheppard had to have permission from his superiors to allow Wallace to sacrifice himself.

The SGC is high security facility.

Sheppard had to get permission to have the Wraith brought to the SGC. No one can be snuck through the stargate without it being recorded and brought to the attention of the person in charge, usually Landry, especially not a high profile and dangerous prisoner like the Wraith. Sheppard would be in the brig if he had tried to sneak the Wraith in without permission.

Not arguing with this. They've got a documented problem: Jeannie has the nanovirus. Though, I wondered why they brought the wraith to Earth instead of Jeannie to Atlantis (IMO that would've been safer security-wise). Maybe for the same reason they took Steve the Wraith to Hoff in the first season instead of the test patient to Atlantis (Episode: Poisoning the Well).


The SGC would have instituted very tight security measures to contain the Wraith. Part of that security can be seen in the choice of room as a lab for the Wraith to work in. There are at least two large windows in one wall of that room. When the Wraith collapses, two guards can be seen in the room behind the windows, one of them picks up a phone and talks to someone. These same windows can be seen when McKay walks into the lab and watches Wallace’s body being wheeled out.

There are probably security cameras in the room used as a lab, as well.

Those rooms are medical isolation rooms, you know, for quarantines and stuff. Yeah, they do have pretty tight security. Just thought you'd like to know. :mckay:


In the lab, itself, there are some SGC guards (at least one) with the Wraith. There are two more guards with the Wraith who are probably Sheppard’s men, the ones who brought the Wraith through the gate. There is an SGC guard outside the door to the lab.

Sheppard is important on Atlantis but in the SGC he’s just a Lieutenant Colonel. There would usually be some number of colonels there and a general (Landry). Someone from the SGC would be given responsibility for the security of the Wraith’s presence on base. Sheppard is a visitor there and is focused on the overall reason for the Wraith’s presence. He is, however, the available expert on the Wraith so he would be participating in security.

Sheppard could not have taken Wallace into the lab without being observed. Even if he could have ordered the guards out of the lab, there could have been no reason to order them out of the observation room. He could not have disabled any security cameras without being detected. Therefore, he would have either been in full view of SGC personnel or his actions would have been so suspicious as to call attention to the situation.

Two conclusions are possible from the lack of privacy issue alone: Sheppard had permission/orders to do what he did or he had decided to sacrifice his career and possibly his freedom to keep McKay alive and the Wraith working on the Replicator attack code.

Sheppard would have identified the need to keep McKay away from the Wraith, but he wouldn’t have the capability or the authority to revoke his access privileges. Someone with more authority in the SGC had to do that for him and he had to provide them with a credible reason for it.

Sheppard made no attempt to hide any deception when he told McKay what would be in the report of the incident. He told him in a room with, at least, five other people in it, two more in the observation room, presumably with microphones in the lab, and in full view of whatever cameras are present.

Sheppard’s ‘the Wraith got lose’ story would have been a joke to his superiors in the SGC. No one would have believed it. There is too much security and too many witnesses. Sheppard would never have even considered writing such a report unless he knew that it would be approved. The story could have been made plausible for those outside the SGC.

Allowing a man to commit suicide by being killed by a dangerous prisoner is very bad. Allowing a man to be killed by a dangerous prisoner because of your negligence is only marginally better. We don’t actually know who was responsible for the Wraith in the SGC, besides Sheppard, so we don’t know who would get blamed for the negligence. But, apparently, it was the negligence story that went into the report. Negligence with some version of ‘Gosh, no one had any idea how strong the Wraith could be when he was desperate to feed.’

Explaining Wallace’s presence in the lab is another matter. Wallace’s company had been working on nanite programming, so some story would be possible. Wallace could have been in the lab as a consultant or Sheppard could have been trying to convince him to help out by showing him the lab. Permission for this from the NID or the SGC should have been easy enough to obtain. Maybe the SGC would be suspicious as to the amount of help Wallace could be, but outside the SGC the story could be made plausible.

The most likely scenario is that Sheppard had permission from his superiors to allow Wallace to sacrifice himself. Just as Sheppard had to tell Wallace the situation so that he could save Jeannie’s life, he had to tell General Landry, O’Neill, or someone the situation so that he could take Wallace to the Wraith and let him feed without interference. Wallace would have had to convince the SGC that he wanted to sacrifice himself to keep his victim, Jeannie, from dying and to save her family. Since there are other benefits to keeping the Wraith alive, saving the Pegasus humans among them, I doubt that it was too hard for the pragmatic SGC to make the decision to allow Wallace do it. Thus Sheppard would have the permission he requested.

IMO, the SGC would make that decision, but they would not want to have to justify it to those lacking the perspective that the stargate has provided. So, like Woolsey, they would prefer the report to reflect a less controversial version of the circumstances i.e., ‘the Wraith got loose.’

Outside the SGC the circumstances of the Wraith’s confinement would be unknown. Even if the report looked fishy, it is unlikely that more would come of it.

IMO, Sheppard did not act alone. He would not have been able to allow the Wraith to feed on Wallace in secret. There is too much oversight by the SGC. The ‘official’ version of the incident that Sheppard tells McKay is the version the SGC wants reported. If Sheppard acted alone, without permission, he would be awaiting disciplinary action, not reading comic books in Atlantis.

Personally, I think that permission is a pretty strong word. I really don't think they would've given Sheppard 'orders' per se, just they were willing to turn a blind eye and let Sheppard do the dirty work for them. Maybe Sheppard convinced Landry to lock out McKay's access (and Dr. Lee's obviously, since Sheppard could guess what McKay would try next). I can buy that, but I just can't see Landry pulling Sheppard aside and giving him clandestine orders to feed Wallace to the wraith by any means necessary. :wraithanime11:

blue-skyz
December 11th, 2007, 12:18 PM
Personally, I think that permission is a pretty strong word. I really don't think they would've given Sheppard 'orders' per se, just they were willing to turn a blind eye and let Sheppard do the dirty work for them.
'turn a blind eye' translates to permission and collusion in my vocabulary, but, as you say, probably not traceable orders.

There were a lot of witnesses who had to be told to be blind for a period of time.

I don’t think Sheppard carries that kind of authority in the SGC unless he has some backing.

Mattathias2.0
December 11th, 2007, 01:31 PM
I doubt he had 'permission.'

I actually found at least 2 major problems that are far more serious.
1. Jeannie now has nanites in her bloodstream. That doesn't bold well for several reasons.
2. Todd we know fed from Wallace. Wallace also happens to know alot about things regarding Earth that could be considered a security risk (esp since he wasn't suppose to know it). Is it possible Todd also tortured him for information as well as feeding off him? I also noticed Todd was so quick to say he was finished right after the feeding. Suspicious, indeed.

IlluZen
December 11th, 2007, 05:02 PM
'turn a blind eye' translates to permission and collusion in my vocabulary, but, as you say, probably not traceable orders.

There were a lot of witnesses who had to be told to be blind for a period of time.

I don’t think Sheppard carries that kind of authority in the SGC unless he has some backing.

I looked up permission in the dictionary:


permission |p?r ?mi sh?n|
noun
consent; authorization : They had entered the country without permission. | [with infinitive ] He had received permission to go to Brussels.
• an official document giving authorization : permissions to reproduce copyright material.

I'd say the important difference is that permission the way you're thinking of it was permission before the fact: that Landry knew what Sheppard was doing as he was doing it, and allowed it. I think that Landry (and other SGC bigwigs) weren't really keeping close tabs on Sheppard until Wallace died, but once it happened, they covered for him.


I doubt he had 'permission.'

I actually found at least 2 major problems that are far more serious.
1. Jeannie now has nanites in her bloodstream. That doesn't bold well for several reasons.
2. Todd we know fed from Wallace. Wallace also happens to know alot about things regarding Earth that could be considered a security risk (esp since he wasn't suppose to know it). Is it possible Todd also tortured him for information as well as feeding off him? I also noticed Todd was so quick to say he was finished right after the feeding. Suspicious, indeed.

I dunno about the Wraith torturing Wallace for information. It looked like Sheppard was in the room with them the whole time, though since it happened off-screen, it's just speculation on both our parts.

Mattathias2.0
December 11th, 2007, 05:07 PM
I dunno about the Wraith torturing Wallace for information. It looked like Sheppard was in the room with them the whole time, though since it happened off-screen, it's just speculation on both our parts.

It is speculation. What could have Sheppard done? If they killed Todd then they wouldn't be able to save Jeannie anyways. Todd was in a superior position.

blue-skyz
December 11th, 2007, 06:10 PM
I'd say the important difference is that permission the way you're thinking of it was permission before the fact: that Landry knew what Sheppard was doing as he was doing it, and allowed it. I think that Landry (and other SGC bigwigs) weren't really keeping close tabs on Sheppard until Wallace died, but once it happened, they covered for him.
That’s right, I think Sheppard told Landry, O’Neill, or ? the situation and the possible solution. I also think Wallace had to ask them to allow him to sacrifice himself. They made the decision to let him save his victim. I think that’s the only conclusion that leaves Sheppard sitting in Atlantis.

If the SGC just covered for him, there is no way for them to be sure that Wallace’s acted of his own volition and that he had a valid and even noble reason to doing it. They may still have covered for Sheppard but it’s hard to believe they would just immediately send him back to Atlantis.

Sheppard had to know that he could not do it in secret, therefore, without prior permission, he had to expect to be in serious trouble.

Ruffles
December 12th, 2007, 06:36 AM
I think he did. Too many things could go wrong if he did it on his own, and he couldn't risk failure.


It is speculation. What could have Sheppard done? If they killed Todd then they wouldn't be able to save Jeannie anyways. Todd was in a superior position.

What vital information do you think Todd could have gotten from Wallace? The location of Earth in the Milky Way? The gate address? The best way to order a cheeseburger?

IlluZen
December 12th, 2007, 08:18 AM
It is speculation. What could have Sheppard done? If they killed Todd then they wouldn't be able to save Jeannie anyways. Todd was in a superior position.

If it came to a choice between the lives of everyone on Earth and Jeannie, Sheppard would've killed the wraith regardless of consequences. Since this isn't a good risk-reward scenario for the wraith, I don't think he would've taken the chance.


That’s right, I think Sheppard told Landry, O’Neill, or ? the situation and the possible solution. I also think Wallace had to ask them to allow him to sacrifice himself. They made the decision to let him save his victim. I think that’s the only conclusion that leaves Sheppard sitting in Atlantis.

If the SGC just covered for him, there is no way for them to be sure that Wallace’s acted of his own volition and that he had a valid and even noble reason to doing it. They may still have covered for Sheppard but it’s hard to believe they would just immediately send him back to Atlantis.

Sheppard had to know that he could not do it in secret, therefore, without prior permission, he had to expect to be in serious trouble.

I dunno, what if Landry had said 'no'? From Sheppard's POV, it probably would've seemed that kind of amoral behavior would be frowned upon by the bigwigs, and he's had a lot of experience with asking to do something and being told no (Afghanistan and his black mark, going back to Atlantis in the Return, saving Elizabeth after Lifeline). Better to ask forgiveness (even if it meant jail time, or the loss of Atlantis, but that both Jeannie and McKay would still be alive) than to ask permission and have it denied (at which point McKay could've been dead, and he would've had his access to Wallace revoked definitely, and to the Wraith possibly).

This isn't a question of if Landry/O'Niell (and other SGC bigwigs) would've actually said yes or no to this, but what Sheppard thought they'd say. I think he'd go ahead and do this on his own because he didn't want the possibility of being told no. And plus, we don't know how long it was between the feeding scene and when they got back to Atlantis (certainly enough time for McKay to buy his sister a car), so maybe there was a small inquiry into his behavior. :sheppardanime32:

expendable_crewman
December 12th, 2007, 09:26 AM
Sheppard and company stole a key card, (Return 1) knocked out an SGC team member, stole a Jumper, and launched a rescue outside the purview of, and without persimssion from, Landry. He did it in spite of Landry.

And he set up no contingency plan to get away with it.

In Miller's Crossing, he isn't in a disconnected section of Atlantis where he can maneuver on his own terms and according to whatever is driving him. He isn't leaving the SGC for the Pegasus.

He is operating in a secure environment within which he is not a familiar face (in spite of six months as a team leader of SG-8 or SG-14 or whatever). He isn't in charge of anything. In Atlantis, he's the base commander or 2IC depending on your opinion.

When he's on Earth, he slips about four or five notches down the food chain.

How does he get the iris to open for the Wraith's arrival and how does he get a compliment of heavily armed Stargate Command security personnel to back up the security detail of Marines from Atlantis?

He does it by working with the man in charge of the base.

The camera pans to the back of the SGC gate room. Get a look at those guards. They're SGC. They wear berets and their berets have SGC badges on them.

If I was going out on a limb, I'd also add no way there is a Wraith on Earth without Landry picking up his red phone and telling the President.

And Landry wishy-washy, acting like he has mist in his head instead of brains doesn't work for me. If Landry let a Wraith through his Stargate, he'd know it, own it, and stare down anybody who had a problem with it. The man is a two-star general, not a congressman. He remembers when he gives his permission for people to do stuff. He'll remember if he said to open the iris and he'll remember oif he told a contingent of his own guards to stand-by and beef up Sheppard's Wraith security detail.

As for Wallace and the Wraith, there's an SGC guard in the lab and there's one in the hall.

I'm trying to picture General Landry getting the phone call that Wallace "went for a tour of the lab and got eaten by a Wraith" and I'm trying to picture the call as Landry's first clue to what Sheppard was going to do.

If it happened that way, and I don't think it did, do we think Landry fell off a turnip truck or something? He'd figure out someone under his command fed a human to a Wraith without his permission. A two-star general? Oh well, as long as I don't get in trouble for it, it's okay? Nothing is supposed to go on in his domain without his permission and when it does the man should act just like he acted in Return 1, he should bust a gut, and IMO that extends to his Earth-based guards doing backup security for Sheppard and it includes the Atlantis military commander giving a tour of a top secret lab to a civilain in custody.

IMO, Landry knew and supported it.

blue-skyz
December 12th, 2007, 09:47 AM
And plus, we don't know how long it was between the feeding scene and when they got back to Atlantis (certainly enough time for McKay to buy his sister a car), so maybe there was a small inquiry into his behavior. :sheppardanime32:
Sheppard and McKay did not return at the same time. When McKay comes into Sheppard’s quarters he has just returned, but Sheppard has been there. He asks McKay about the family.

It is likely that Sheppard returned with the Wraith immediately, so the Wraith could continue with the Replicator coding. McKay took Jeannie home, smoothed things over, bought her a car and then came back to Atlantis. He would not have stayed with Jeannie long, because he is needed to work to work on the Replicator coding with the Wraith (though not continually as we have seen ;)).

IlluZen
December 12th, 2007, 01:20 PM
Sheppard and company stole a key card, (Return 1) knocked out an SGC team member, stole a Jumper, and launched a rescue outside the purview of, and without persimssion from, Landry. He did it in spite of Landry.

And he set up no contingency plan to get away with it.

In Miller's Crossing, he isn't in a disconnected section of Atlantis where he can maneuver on his own terms and according to whatever is driving him. He isn't leaving the SGC for the Pegasus.

He is operating in a secure environment within which he is not a familiar face (in spite of six months as a team leader of SG-8 or SG-14 or whatever). He isn't in charge of anything. In Atlantis, he's the base commander or 2IC depending on your opinion.

When he's on Earth, he slips about four or five notches down the food chain.

How does he get the iris to open for the Wraith's arrival and how does he get a compliment of heavily armed Stargate Command security personnel to back up the security detail of Marines from Atlantis?

He does it by working with the man in charge of the base.

The camera pans to the back of the SGC gate room. Get a look at those guards. They're SGC. They wear berets and their berets have SGC badges on them.

If I was going out on a limb, I'd also add no way there is a Wraith on Earth without Landry picking up his red phone and telling the President.

And Landry wishy-washy, acting like he has mist in his head instead of brains doesn't work for me. If Landry let a Wraith through his Stargate, he'd know it, own it, and stare down anybody who had a problem with it. The man is a two-star general, not a congressman. He remembers when he gives his permission for people to do stuff. He'll remember if he said to open the iris and he'll remember oif he told a contingent of his own guards to stand-by and beef up Sheppard's Wraith security detail.

As for Wallace and the Wraith, there's an SGC guard in the lab and there's one in the hall.

I'm trying to picture General Landry getting the phone call that Wallace "went for a tour of the lab and got eaten by a Wraith" and I'm trying to picture the call as Landry's first clue to what Sheppard was going to do.

If it happened that way, and I don't think it did, do we think Landry fell off a turnip truck or something? He'd figure out someone under his command fed a human to a Wraith without his permission. A two-star general? Oh well, as long as I don't get in trouble for it, it's okay? Nothing is supposed to go on in his domain without his permission and when it does the man should act just like he acted in Return 1, he should bust a gut, and IMO that extends to his Earth-based guards doing backup security for Sheppard and it includes the Atlantis military commander giving a tour of a top secret lab to a civilain in custody.

IMO, Landry knew and supported it.

Well duh Landry knew about the wraith in the SGC! That's pretty obvious, and there's nothing wrong about it being there (under proper prisoner procedures and stuff) to help McKay save his sister, so that wasn't the part I was arguing about. However, knowing that the wraith and Wallace are being held in the SGC is a far cry from knowing that Sheppard plans to 'help' Wallace feed himself to the wraith. That's something I would think Landry wouldn't know about until the last minute, right after it happens.

Security cameras are normally only useful after the fact, because Landry isn't going to be sitting around like Big Brother watching Sheppard's every move and listening in on every conversation in real time while he's on base. He's got other things to do, like running the whole base, and the security guards assigned to watch probably just look for people causing trouble, and are not actively listening in on individual conversations (when there could be hundreds of different conversations going on throughout the base). So the first warning would be when the wraith starts feeding.

Furthermore, unless the guards in the room have contradictory standing orders (which I don't believe they did), they're going to obey when Sheppard says to stand down and let the Wraith feed because he's a higher rank than they are, even if they notify Landry of what happened ASAP afterwards.

It's like when O'Niell walked out with Marin right under Gen. Hammond's nose in SG1 episode 3x05, Learning Curve, even though he wasn't supposed to. Hammond didn't know until right after the fact, even though he's supposed to know everything that goes on in his 'domain'. :hammond04:


Sheppard and McKay did not return at the same time. When McKay comes into Sheppard’s quarters he has just returned, but Sheppard has been there. He asks McKay about the family.

It is likely that Sheppard returned with the Wraith immediately, so the Wraith could continue with the Replicator coding. McKay took Jeannie home, smoothed things over, bought her a car and then came back to Atlantis. He would not have stayed with Jeannie long, because he is needed to work to work on the Replicator coding with the Wraith (though not continually as we have seen ;)).

I really can't speculate on this because it happens off-screen, but you do have a point. :)

expendable_crewman
December 12th, 2007, 03:09 PM
Well duh Landry knew about the wraith in the SGC! That's pretty obvious, and there's nothing wrong about it being there (under proper prisoner procedures and stuff) to help McKay save his sister, so that wasn't the part I was arguing about.

Not duh. People are still debating this. Good to know, though, someone agrees with me.


However, knowing that the wraith and Wallace are being held in the SGC is a far cry from knowing that Sheppard plans to 'help' Wallace feed himself to the wraith. That's something I would think Landry wouldn't know about until the last minute, right after it happens.

I disagree. Sheppard is still part of SGC in the next ep, This Mortal Coil. (I hope that's not a spoiler for anyone! He's in the previews!). Therefore, Sheppard did not usurp his general's command and commandeer his general's security people to move Wallace and facilitate the feeding.

Since one of the guys in the lab is SGC (Landry's) security when Sheppard lets the Wraith feed on Wallace, there can be no doubt Landry knows the "story" is not what really happened.


Security cameras are normally only useful after the fact, because Landry isn't going to be sitting around like Big Brother watching Sheppard's every move and listening in on every conversation in real time while he's on base.

No need to. Sheppard works for Landry.


He's got other things to do, like running the whole base, and the security guards assigned to watch probably just look for people causing trouble, and are not actively listening in on individual conversations (when there could be hundreds of different conversations going on throughout the base). So the first warning would be when the wraith starts feeding.

Overlooking another scenario. The other scenario is Sheppard discussed the issues of losing the Wraith permanently as a possible asset and Landry signed off on his plan.


Furthermore, unless the guards in the room have contradictory standing orders (which I don't believe they did), they're going to obey when Sheppard says to stand down and let the Wraith feed because he's a higher rank than they are, even if they notify Landry of what happened ASAP afterwards.

That's not as simple as a rank thing, at least not in my world. Rank has its privileges and it's especially good to know (if you're the SGC security man) that your boss outranks a lieutenant colonel and can chew your hide harder and longer than a light bird whose base is in another galaxy. If the light bird gives an order your commander (a general) won't like, you can refuse. The military has this rule that says we only have to follow "lawful" orders and we can actually get in trouble for following unlawful ones.

But like I said, I don't think any of that drama took place in the lab, since IMO Landry's cajones are as big as Sheppard's and Sheppard still has his job.

Oh, almost forgot this part ... Landry was going to nuke Sheppard in Return 2. It was O'Neill who saved Sheppard's job, not Landry's general (no pun intended) tolerance for shenannigans. Landry, btw, is outranked by O'Neill. O'Neill's motivation: Sheppard saved his life = one get out of jail free card.


It's like when O'Niell walked out with Marin right under Gen. Hammond's nose in SG1 episode 3x05, Learning Curve, even though he wasn't supposed to. Hammond didn't know until right after the fact, even though he's supposed to know everything that goes on in his 'domain'. :hammond04:


Dead guy in your domain, er, lab and your employee didn't tell you he was going to make that happen = no job for you in the morning.