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mlarke
November 10th, 2007, 09:21 PM
I was really digging this episode, all of the Keller whining aside. I started off the season liking her character, but now, I'm not so sure. Even though she came through in the end.

Back to the title of the thread.

I like that we got to see the ruthless side of Teyla. It's nice to see that even the "Daniel" of Atlantis has a bit of a dark side. Maybe dark side isn't the right phrase for it. More like her killer instinct coming through in a much darker way. I mean, I don't blame her, I'd be pissed too if all of my people had apparently been served as 3 squares.

Chadness
November 12th, 2007, 06:14 AM
I'm confused as to why people thought Keller was "whining" throughout this episode. She's a civilian doctor who probably has seen little to no action of this sort, let alone been in a life-threatening situation like this. I doubt any one of us would have fared better in a similar situation.

I thought it was the best episode of the season so far.

As far as the dark side of Teyla goes, I completely agree, its interesting to see that side of her.

The.Road.Not.Taken
November 12th, 2007, 08:13 AM
i abouslutly love keller shes the best it was funny to see keller cry and panic and to eat that food it was funny

teyla was wicked she was so vicous at fighting and killing people and that poor defencless bolokai she killed him haha

jenks
November 12th, 2007, 08:21 AM
Yeah I didn't even consider it whining to be honest, she's a young female doctor, unarmed and being chased through an unfamiliar place by people who want to murder and eat her, I don't know about anyone on here but I'm pretty sure that I'd be ****ting myself.

Ranlier
November 12th, 2007, 08:39 AM
The problem is false standards- people think everyone in scifi needs to be a raging badass (even McKay and Zalenka have been seen unafraid to brandish weapons, which is entirely unrealistic).

Fact of the matter is, most everyone on this board would have been Keller, not Teyla, if they were in the same situation. She represents an average person (more or less such as ourselves), thrown into a very bad situation with no special skills or training.

Chadness
November 12th, 2007, 09:44 AM
Fact of the matter is, most everyone on this board would have been Keller, not Teyla, if they were in the same situation. She represents an average person (more or less such as ourselves), thrown into a very bad situation with no special skills or training.

This's what I like about what they're doing with Dr. Keller, she's a down-to-earth, average person thrown into unusual circumstances. Of course she's going to react like that, most of us would. And I thought it was a great episode becaue of it.

Darren
November 12th, 2007, 09:45 AM
If this thread is about Teyla "the Executioner" (Teyla's dark side), can we make a second thread for the Keller discussion?

The.Road.Not.Taken
November 12th, 2007, 09:49 AM
If this thread is about Teyla "the Executioner" (Teyla's dark side), can we make a second thread for the Keller discussion?

haha i don't know i just like it is about teyla and keller because there both wicked

Mitchell82
November 12th, 2007, 03:21 PM
I'm confused as to why people thought Keller was "whining" throughout this episode. She's a civilian doctor who probably has seen little to no action of this sort, let alone been in a life-threatening situation like this. I doubt any one of us would have fared better in a similar situation.

I thought it was the best episode of the season so far.

As far as the dark side of Teyla goes, I completely agree, its interesting to see that side of her.

This was an excellent episode contributing to an excellent season. Agree on all points.

mlarke
November 12th, 2007, 05:40 PM
The problem is false standards- people think everyone in scifi needs to be a raging badass (even McKay and Zalenka have been seen unafraid to brandish weapons, which is entirely unrealistic).

Fact of the matter is, most everyone on this board would have been Keller, not Teyla, if they were in the same situation. She represents an average person (more or less such as ourselves), thrown into a very bad situation with no special skills or training.

Yes, I would have been scared out of my gourd, however, I wouldn't have been walking around talking about my inner ear condition while being chased through the woods by cannibals. I all fairness though, I can't remember if the cannibal thing had been brought up at that point.

Somethine else that didn't really make much sense to me is the whole "I'm not trained for this," excuse. It's almost inconceivable that they didn't have everyone go through at least a basic training course. I don't mean to suggest that everyone should have spec-ops training just to go there, that would be ridiculous, but maybe just some basic cqb stuff, just in case, oh I don't know, the Wraith invade the city again. I know that regardless of what position I would be taking there, be it lowly lab-tech, city administrator, or that extra that gets blown up by a tumor, I would want to know how to stomp on someone if the need ever arose, in fact, I would insist upon it. That way all the hot chicks there wouldn't think I'm all brain and no...well you get the idea.

CalmStorm
November 12th, 2007, 06:01 PM
I don't think this was Teyal being an "executioner" or even her showing a dark side. Being aware of what the Bola Kai did and had done in the past, she did what was necessary to survive. She was probably correct when she said that if they allowed any to live they would just rejoin the hunt. It was self-defense against an attacker trying to kill them, not an execution.

Xaeden
November 12th, 2007, 08:17 PM
Yes, I would have been scared out of my gourd, however, I wouldn't have been walking around talking about my inner ear condition while being chased through the woods by cannibals. I all fairness though, I can't remember if the cannibal thing had been brought up at that point.

Yes, but you don't have a phobia of heights. If someone wanted me to walk through a pit full of mice in order to have a chance of eluding capture for the night, I'd take my chances with the brutish cannibals. All she did was try to talk her way out of it because she was legitimately paniced and when she realized she wasn't going to get away with that she decided to face her fear. I can assume you don't have a phobia to not understand how much of on accomplishment that was.


Somethine else that didn't really make much sense to me is the whole "I'm not trained for this," excuse. It's almost inconceivable that they didn't have everyone go through at least a basic training course. I don't mean to suggest that everyone should have spec-ops training just to go there, that would be ridiculous, but maybe just some basic cqb stuff, just in case, oh I don't know, the Wraith invade the city again. I know that regardless of what position I would be taking there, be it lowly lab-tech, city administrator, or that extra that gets blown up by a tumor, I would want to know how to stomp on someone if the need ever arose, in fact, I would insist upon it. That way all the hot chicks there wouldn't think I'm all brain and no...well you get the idea.

And yet we have people like Beckett, Mckay, Zelenka, and now Keller who didn't even know how to handle a gun and had to run around receiving onsite training. Keller's job is to do her thing in the infirmary while marines guard her. It's not like she signed up to run around into combat like Beckett did as the former chief medical officer who wasn't trained either. He, like most people, (possibly including Keller) got the job when they thought they were going to on a peaceful expedition. While they prepared for danger as it would've stupid not to, they did not think it necessary to require civilians to receive some basic training (it's not like they had the time to do so either). Maybe now that would be a better idea, but after years of Sg-1 we've seen a number of scientists who are still not at all trained to defend themselves despite being sent into the field so this is nothing new.

However, it should be noted that she specifically said that she knew she should be prepared, so we really don't know that they haven't gone through some kind of course. But even so there's a huge difference between sitting in a class room and hearing about what might happen to you and being out there with cannibals chasing you and a bad ankle. That's enough to make any normal person freak out. Over time she'll adjust like everyone else did.

Btw, here's a bit of history for you. I know people are going to claim they should've learned since then and they are recruitting people for the SG program, not drafting them, but I thought it interesting to make note of it...

http://books.google.com/books?id=jZuRKVKWn4YC&pg=PR12&lpg=PR12&dq=training+mash+doctors&source=web&ots=ielPupTf3U&sig=aosE8PaV5I-aHT5NmZMZc09yaqs

Few of the doctors assigned to Korea had any training in the treatment of wounds and diseases common to warfare, in military operations in a field combat environment, or in the customs and traditions of military organizations. On the one hand, without hte guidelines of military medical procedures or the physical proximity to the pooled military experience in the rear echelons hospitals, the doctors and nurses had to learn military field operations and military medicine on the job in order to provide the medical care required in the combat zone.

Avenger
November 12th, 2007, 08:36 PM
Yes, I would have been scared out of my gourd, however, I wouldn't have been walking around talking about my inner ear condition while being chased through the woods by cannibals. I all fairness though, I can't remember if the cannibal thing had been brought up at that point.

Somethine else that didn't really make much sense to me is the whole "I'm not trained for this," excuse. It's almost inconceivable that they didn't have everyone go through at least a basic training course. I don't mean to suggest that everyone should have spec-ops training just to go there, that would be ridiculous, but maybe just some basic cqb stuff, just in case, oh I don't know, the Wraith invade the city again. I know that regardless of what position I would be taking there, be it lowly lab-tech, city administrator, or that extra that gets blown up by a tumor, I would want to know how to stomp on someone if the need ever arose, in fact, I would insist upon it. That way all the hot chicks there wouldn't think I'm all brain and no...well you get the idea.

Because a basic training course sure prepares you for being hunted by big scary guys with spears and axes and cross bows. No offense, but if you think any kind of basic training will actually properly prepare you for being a a life or death kind of situation like Keller and Teyla were in, you're flat out wrong. Then you have to factor in that not everyone if wired to handle those kind of situations as well as other people.

People truly learn to handle stressful situations by being in them.

Jill_Ion
November 12th, 2007, 08:41 PM
The problem is false standards- people think everyone in scifi needs to be a raging badass (even McKay and Zalenka have been seen unafraid to brandish weapons, which is entirely unrealistic).


Hee hee, we saw Zelenka brandishing a weapon, but he sure was afraid! (Tabula Rasa)

:lol:

Mrja84
November 24th, 2020, 07:02 PM
The problem is false standards- people think everyone in scifi needs to be a raging badass (even McKay and Zalenka have been seen unafraid to brandish weapons, which is entirely unrealistic).

It should be noted that over the seasons McKay has gotten more comfortable with the weapons. He started with just a pistol and has been more able to use automatic weapons. He's not going to be the best shooter, but at least he's accepting that he'll be in firefights.

Likewise, Daniel Jackson started seemingly fairly new to combat situations and by season 10 he's blew up a tank of goa-uld and killed many, many Jaffa.