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PuddleJumper67
October 30th, 2007, 03:10 PM
Do you think most of Sheppard's decisions are reckless or are they smart? For example, in "Travelers," he sent the S.O.S. signal and enabled his team to find him...but he also attracted the Wraith's attention.

kirmit
October 30th, 2007, 03:43 PM
I wouldn't say reckless, i'd call it naive to think no one else would pick up the signal.

P-90_177
October 30th, 2007, 03:44 PM
yeah i'd say the same. It seems to me that he is a great soldier and he knows how to survive. But he finds it hard in such situations to think past his own survival. Which is fair enough really.

wm_1987
October 30th, 2007, 05:23 PM
Do you think most of Sheppard's decisions are reckless or are they smart? For example, in "Travelers," he sent the S.O.S. signal and enabled his team to find him...but he also attracted the Wraith's attention.


I wouldn't say that they are reckless, maybe not well thought out. But if you think of all the consiquences, like in Travelers, then decisions could never be made. Sometimes you just have to act, and not think to much, it could do more damage.

I don't know, it's just a TV show!!:)

PG15
October 30th, 2007, 06:59 PM
He's thinking for the moment, just like all pilots.

sherryw
October 30th, 2007, 07:13 PM
Do you think most of Sheppard's decisions are reckless or are they smart? For example, in "Travelers," he sent the S.O.S. signal and enabled his team to find him...but he also attracted the Wraith's attention.

I think that the writers have to have some level of danger in each episode. With Sheppard sending out that signal in Travelers that initially caused the danger with the Wraith showing up. I know as a fan of the show like to have that underying tone of danger.

KiLL3r
October 30th, 2007, 07:20 PM
the show would be pretty dull if nothing dangerous ever happened. then you be on here complaining about the lack of recklessness

Copernicus
October 30th, 2007, 07:57 PM
Do you think most of Sheppard's decisions are reckless or are they smart? For example, in "Travelers," he sent the S.O.S. signal and enabled his team to find him...but he also attracted the Wraith's attention.
The fact of the matter is that it wasn't a comparison between going home safely and sending out the SOS, but rather the mitigation of risk.

Sheppard believed, I would argue rightly based on his knowledge at the time, that his actions would increase his chance of survival. After all, Sheppard doesn't have access to the information that the "redeemability of seemingly bad people" scale on Stargate shows, and don't get me wrong, I love Stargate, is directly correlated to the attractiveness of the actor or actress. The writers couldn't even bring themselves to make Baal pure evil, but that's an aside. Based on what seems to me to be logical analysis, he had a greater chance for survival from trying to signal anyone than from playing along haplessly, which were his two options, as I see them.

Vapor
October 30th, 2007, 08:05 PM
I would like to imagine that Shep was fully aware of the risk of alerting other ships, but decided that he wanted/needed to survive for various reasons which were worth that risk.

It works out, since his signal was cut off from Atlantis and he told them about people that were shooting at him, so he knows that they know that he could be out there somewhere.

Since he knows of the conflict with the Asurans, and the unlikelyhood that they would be taken somewhere that is known to be near Wraith, the fact that they actually showed up seems like more of a "blind bad luck" thing.

At least that's how I like to look at it... >_>

Lunatiger
October 30th, 2007, 08:28 PM
It wouldn't be a show if there weren't reckless acts. Should I list all the reckless things everyone on the show has done?

prion
October 31st, 2007, 06:04 AM
Do you think most of Sheppard's decisions are reckless or are they smart? For example, in "Travelers," he sent the S.O.S. signal and enabled his team to find him...but he also attracted the Wraith's attention.

No, didn't see it as reckless. He needed help, he knew it, and sent the SOS. Who was to know the Wraith would pick up on it?

Lunatiger It wouldn't be a show if there weren't reckless acts. Should I list all the reckless things everyone on the show has done?

You'd blow the server ;)

FireCat
October 31st, 2007, 06:51 AM
He's thinking for the moment, just like all pilots.


See, the writers just aren't aware how the military works. Up to the rank of Major, officers are subjected to combat duty. The position of "Lt. Colonel" is more of a leadership training position. Lt. Colonels spend a great deal of time learning to command large troops, and handle various situations - sort of a transitional position. At this point in his career, Sheppard should no longer be thinking as a pilot, but as a commanding officer. He isn't.

PG15
October 31st, 2007, 03:13 PM
Well, I'm the last person to ask about military stuff, but to me, he's dealing with vastly new situations all the time, so I don't see why he wouldn't sometimes revert back to pilot-thinking.

Beyonder
October 31st, 2007, 04:17 PM
I wouldn't call it reckless either. He was kinda in a hot spot, and as they say: Desperate times call for desperate measures. Right?

FallenAngelII
November 1st, 2007, 12:11 AM
Well, I'm the last person to ask about military stuff, but to me, he's dealing with vastly new situations all the time, so I don't see why he wouldn't sometimes revert back to pilot-thinking.
3+ years... at war with two vastly superior races... former Military Commander of Atlantis for said 3 years.

He should know better than to randomly send out signals in space by now.

Beyonder
November 1st, 2007, 04:02 AM
What other options did he got?

Linzi
November 1st, 2007, 06:44 AM
Do you think most of Sheppard's decisions are reckless or are they smart? For example, in "Travelers," he sent the S.O.S. signal and enabled his team to find him...but he also attracted the Wraith's attention.
I think most of Sheppard's decisions show him to be human. Some are good calls, some not. He's not a robot, he makes mistakes like we all do. The SOS in Travelers was a good decision. I thought it was very clever, and especially so because only McKay et al would know it was from him. Others might have come across it, like the wraith, and gone to investigate it, but they would have had no idea about morse code, or who sent it. Sheppard brilliantly came up with a way of asking for help, letting the team know where he was, and found a way that only they would know it was definitely from him. It was a simple, yet effective idea So, in the case of that decision, I thought that was excellent.

Other decisions? Goodness, who knows? Some were good, some didn't turn out to be so good.

blue-skyz
November 1st, 2007, 09:10 AM
Do you think most of Sheppard's decisions are reckless or are they smart? For example, in "Travelers," he sent the S.O.S. signal and enabled his team to find him...but he also attracted the Wraith's attention.
What other option did Sheppard have? They threatened to kill him. How much worse off could he be if someone other than his people showed up.

He expected McKay to be able to sort the signal out of the other subspace noise. He didn’t expect other’s to be listening for non random patterns in subspace.

So the Wraith are listening for signs of intelligence in a galaxy of primitive people. Who knew? Does that mean that they know about the Travelers and are looking for them. Or are they listening for Atlantis’ transmissions. If so they should have been on their doorstep a long time ago.

Mitchell82
November 1st, 2007, 11:09 AM
What other option did Sheppard have? They threatened to kill him. How much worse off could he be if someone other than his people showed up.

He expected McKay to be able to sort the signal out of the other subspace noise. He didn’t expect other’s to be listening for non random patterns in subspace.

So the Wraith are listening for signs of intelligence in a galaxy of primitive people. Who knew? Does that mean that they know about the Travelers and are looking for them. Or are they listening for Atlantis’ transmissions. If so they should have been on their doorstep a long time ago.
Exactly. It's not like he had many options.

PG15
November 1st, 2007, 04:43 PM
What other options did he got?

Yeah, basically what I was wondering. Given that Shep didn't know where he was, he wouldn't know how to get back to New Lantia. He also didn't have the PJ on the ship, so there is no point in getting to a gated solar system to gate home.

Redhooks
November 2nd, 2007, 06:41 AM
Yeah, basically what I was wondering. Given that Shep didn't know where he was, he wouldn't know how to get back to New Lantia. He also didn't have the PJ on the ship, so there is no point in getting to a gated solar system to gate home.
Since it wasn't shown or told to us, we have to make some assumptions (too many IMO) in this episode. Sheppard could have flown the Jumper over to the Ancient ship. It doesn't make a lot of sense, but neither does only having Larrin, Silas, and Nevik come over to the ship with Sheppard. Realistically, I believe there should have been at least a couple more technicians, but this is SGA and realism isn't always a prerequisite in a story, hence the term science fiction. ;):P:D
As far as getting home, I'm sure Sheppard thought that some on Atlantis would get his SOS and be along at anytime.

Mitchell82
November 2nd, 2007, 05:56 PM
Yeah, basically what I was wondering. Given that Shep didn't know where he was, he wouldn't know how to get back to New Lantia. He also didn't have the PJ on the ship, so there is no point in getting to a gated solar system to gate home.

Exactly. His options were very limited.

vaberella
November 6th, 2007, 03:23 AM
Do you think most of Sheppard's decisions are reckless or are they smart? For example, in "Travelers," he sent the S.O.S. signal and enabled his team to find him...but he also attracted the Wraith's attention.

I thought that was a calculated risk. So I don't blame him for that. I do however have a bloody problem on when he turned his back on the last wraith to mack with the do-do. The macking should have taken place when they had John in the cell in the final scene.

Other than that...I thought Shep was on point until Travelers. He didn't do much of anything in TR.

Avenger
November 6th, 2007, 06:55 AM
It would have been wreckless if he had any other options, but he didn't. Even though the signal drew the Wraith to the ship first, he might have been able to use the Wraith on the ship as a distraction to help him escape.

stclare
November 6th, 2007, 10:05 AM
I think sending the signal was a calculated risk. the only person he was endangering was himself and his captors. he also from what i could make out disguised the signal as much as possible.

sometimes i think shep is to quick to put himself in danger but not on this occasion. the kiss etc not going there ;)

maessy
November 6th, 2007, 10:19 AM
:sheppard:Given that as a soldier, John Sheppard had to take a chance that the Wraith might pick up the signal as easily as he hoped Atlantis would. The first rule of a captured soldier is to escape. Since he had not been accorded the rights of an ambassador, but rather that of a potential enemy, he could only act with prejudice in kind. Besides, it's always better the enemy you know than the one you don't.:sam:

FallenAngelII
November 6th, 2007, 04:11 PM
What other option did Sheppard have? They threatened to kill him.
Technically, they said they'd kill him if he didn't do their bidding and if he did, they'd let him go. It wasn't until he royally pissed Larrin off that she decided to keep him as a prisoner afterwards.