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Col.Foley
September 30th, 2006, 07:22 AM
Since this is not really a question about Horizon, I though I'd put it here.
Currently for a school project I am writing a character development guide for a book that I am writing. My question is this, since you are also a writer can I perhaps interview you?

Alex Rubit
September 30th, 2006, 09:45 PM
Since this is not really a question about Horizon, I though I'd put it here.
Currently for a school project I am writing a character development guide for a book that I am writing. My question is this, since you are also a writer can I perhaps interview you?

Sure. That wouldn't be a problem. And, in fact, I'm honored that you'd be interested in interviewing me for this book.

Just let me know when and how you'd like to do the interview.

Col.Foley
October 1st, 2006, 07:06 AM
Thanks.
I do have a few ideas for this. One of them, is a phone interview. The other one is a chat through say yahoo, or something along those lines. The last idea is to actually do the interview in this thread. My thought would be that I would ask a question, then every five minutes or so reload the page to see what you responded to the post, then I would post my next question.
The time frame for me is really more concreate, with my school schedule it will proabably have to be next Saturday, as far as time is concerned it would have to be early morning like around nine o'clock AM. Or in the afternoon, say around three o'clock.
As far as that goes what ever works best for you but it needs to be on a saturday, preferably next saturday.
One question though, how many questions would work for you, I don't want to say aske you fifty questions and bog you down.
Thanks again, Alan Prefontaine

Alex Rubit
October 1st, 2006, 04:28 PM
There wouldn't be a problem with doing it in this thread. In that case, of course, it would be available right away to everyone who reads it; so it depends whether or not you'd like to do it that way. It could be interesting, and, I guess, kind of unique.

Next Saturday I'll be working, unfortunately. But I'm off the Saturday after that. If that's too late for you, we might be able to find another day to make it work.

Col.Foley
October 1st, 2006, 05:55 PM
As far as the day is concerned I'll have to ask my supervisor if that is alright, proabably though.
As for the thread idea, I have no problem with other people reading it, In fact it might give them a few ideas of their own. And you are right on the uniqueness. So let us do it on the thread then. One more thing, as for the time, when we do get around to doing the interview, especially on a weekend, three o'clock would be better. That way I can be fully awake.

Alex Rubit
October 1st, 2006, 06:16 PM
Sure, that sounds good. I have no objections to being fully awake when doing this. :cameron:

Just in case, if Saturday in a week is too late, make sure to let me know. Perhaps we can find another time to do it then, maybe at some time during the evening next Saturday.

Col.Foley
October 1st, 2006, 07:20 PM
Sure. Around what time next Saturday evening?

Alex Rubit
October 1st, 2006, 07:39 PM
The earliest would be at 9pm central time.

I really meant if the Saturday after that is too late, though. I'll definitely be less exhausted and more awake if I'm off, rather than having just gotten home after a long day. ;)

But if Saturday in a week really doesn't work, anything after 9pm next Saturday would be fine. So just let me know which time is better.

Col.Foley
October 2nd, 2006, 02:49 PM
That would praobably be too late for me too, so then either we find another day . The better option would be to do it Saturday in a week.

Alex Rubit
October 2nd, 2006, 06:30 PM
Yeah, I won't be home any earlier unfortunately. I will be off the Tuesday after that, though. So I'd be available all day. But Saturday in a week would definitely work.

Whatever works for you should be fine. :)

Col.Foley
October 5th, 2006, 11:57 AM
Just talked to my supervisor today. She said it would be all right if I did do the interview with you on October 14, which is the Saturday after this next upcomming one.
Lets do it.

Alex Rubit
October 5th, 2006, 06:14 PM
Okay, that sounds great. I'm looking forward to it.

Col.Foley
October 7th, 2006, 08:17 AM
Just one last thing that I have to bring up. The time. For me that will be three PM Mountain time, just to cross my Ts buisness. Any way if that gives you any problems let me know. If not, then just say, yey. Or something along those lines.

Alex Rubit
October 7th, 2006, 07:22 PM
Just one last thing that I have to bring up. The time. For me that will be three PM Mountain time, just to cross my Ts buisness. Any way if that gives you any problems let me know. If not, then just say, yey. Or something along those lines.

Yey!

Col.Foley
October 13th, 2006, 01:25 PM
Just one last reminder and final check. Tommorow three PM Mountain time. I'm looking foward to it.

Alex Rubit
October 13th, 2006, 06:29 PM
Just one last reminder and final check. Tommorow three PM Mountain time. I'm looking foward to it.

That sounds good. That would be four PM for me (Central Time).

I'm looking forward to it as well.

Col.Foley
October 14th, 2006, 01:00 PM
Alright. Alex you there?
Here is the lay out. I have around thirteen questions to ask, when we get to the last one I will say something like 'last question' you ready?

Alex Rubit
October 14th, 2006, 01:03 PM
Alright. Alex you there?

I'm here.


Here is the lay out. I have around thirteen questions to ask, when we get to the last one I will say something like 'last question' you ready?

Sounds good. I'm looking forward to your questions.

Col.Foley
October 14th, 2006, 01:05 PM
Question one:
Where did you get your inspiration to stargate Horizon?
Did anything influence the creation of your characters?
Finally how did you go about creating your characters originally?

Col.Foley
October 14th, 2006, 01:22 PM
Alex, still thinking about the question? The questions are going to be posted one at a time. I am starting to get worried.

Alex Rubit
October 14th, 2006, 01:24 PM
Question one:
Where did you get your inspiration to stargate Horizon?

The idea to do kind of my own Stargate spin off really came out of the fact that I had of course been a fan of Stargate ever since I had seen the movie, and that I was interested in screenwriting since I was about fourteen.

Originally the idea was never to actually have it published anywhere; it was more like something I was just doing for my own enjoyment. But the idea for the concept of the series basically was inspired by the SG-1 episode "The Fifth Race," which really indicated for the first time that mankind might have a greater future, as we get closer to becoming the "fifth race."

So what eventually became Stargate: Horizon was designed as a series, which would show how mankind further evolves, moves deeper into space, etc. That was the general idea behind it.

Pretty much from day one I knew it was going to take place on a space station. But a lot of things kept changing throughout the development, of course, like how far into the future would the show take place. Ultimately I decided to only make it seven years, and that was only for the reason of avoiding contradictions with the current television seasons. Otherwise it wouldn't be taking place in the future at all, but much rather in the present time, like SG-1 and SGA.


Did anything influence the creation of your characters?

Not really right away. Eventually the fact that they'd been virtually cast had been an influence, in that the characters were kind of made to fit the individual actors. Not really too different than it would be on a television show actually.


Finally how did you go about creating your characters originally?

I think I can only answer this by explaining how I've gone about creating new characters in general. And in most of the cases it's really the story that kind of helps you figure out what kind of characters you're looking for. Once their basics are established (i.e. John Grant being a Colonel and the team leader), you start working out the characters by giving them a background. And background ultimately is what makes the characters who they are. A good example is how Callen had been introduced at the beginning of Season Two, where his background really played a large role in the story of those first two episodes.

In the case of Horizon it was really about giving each of the characters something that would make them unique. And I think that's not something we did right from the start, but over time; i.e. giving David Connor a wife and a daugther was something that really gave him a lot more depth as a character, and it lead and continues to lead to some really interesting storylines for him.

So I think in general when creating characters it's good approach to try and find something that makes them unique.

Alex Rubit
October 14th, 2006, 01:25 PM
Alex, still thinking about the question? The questions are going to be posted one at a time. I am starting to get worried.

Nope, just typing some elaborate responses. :cameron:

I'll try to type faster as we go on. ;)

Col.Foley
October 14th, 2006, 01:30 PM
Wow! That was long and rather intense. Surprising in a way also.
Question two:
When you are writing a scene of dialouge between say Grant and Sivea, and you are stuck, what do you do to get out of it?

Alex Rubit
October 14th, 2006, 01:41 PM
Wow! That was long and rather intense. Surprising in a way also.
Question two:
When you are writing a scene of dialouge between say Grant and Sivea, and you are stuck, what do you do to get out of it?

It doesn't really happen in my case that I get stuck with the actual dialouge, because by the time I (or any of the writers on Horizon, for that matter) get to the script, the story has already been worked out in form of an outline and/or beat sheet. So when you then approach the scene and the dialogue, you'll already know what information needs to be conveyed in this specific scene, and what story points need to be played.

But that's not to say that we don't get stuck. That happens every now and then when working out the actual story. I think every writer will have their own ways for working around that problem. In my case, I'll usually just take a break and work on something else instead. Then I'll eventually get back to it, and usually what I do is keep re-reading what I've already got, which really helps me get a feel for the overal story. I tend to re-read constantly while writing. And when I've finished the first draft, I'll keep re-reading it all the way through, making little adjustments here and there.

So I think the best way to approach being stuck with a piece of work, is to take a moment, then perhaps re-read it and think about what it was that you wanted to originally achieve with this story and/or scene. And ulimately you start coming up with solutions and ways for making it work.

And to get back to the dialogue again, when writing the actual dialogue, it's mainly a matter of understanding and knowing the characters you're writing. This tends to be more difficult when you first start off, and it gets easier down the road. After two years of working on Horizon (more actually if you count the time prior to the series' launch), I've developed a strong feel for all of the characters. So in the cases of our regulars, the words they say just start coming natural.

Whenever I work on something else, involving other characters, it does take me a while to discover their individual voices. But the key for writing good dialogue, in my oppinion, is to know the characters you're writing, and you need to know what the purpose of the scene is you're working on.

Col.Foley
October 14th, 2006, 01:46 PM
That was long it was intense, and it sounded alot like what I do. I constantly reread my stuff also. I wonder if that old saying about great minds is coming true once again? This question also touched on some of my later questions, I think I will ask them any way.
Question three: What steps do you go through to plan dialogue, or any scene for that matter, between say Tom and Yusuf?

Alex Rubit
October 14th, 2006, 01:56 PM
That was long it was intense, and it sounded alot like what I do. I constantly reread my stuff also. I wonder if that old saying about great minds is coming true once again?

That's quite possible. ;)


This question also touched on some of my later questions, I think I will ask them any way.
Question three: What steps do you go through to plan dialogue, or any scene for that matter, between say Tom and Yusuf?

The best way is really the old-school approach, which is to approach a scene just like a story, with beginning, middle and end. Like I was saying, you should know what the scene is about and what story points it needs to convey. Then you can break it down into a series of beats. And character beats are always actions and reactions between two or more characters.

So once you know what the scene is about, you can start planning it through by making a list of the various beats. Like in "Convergence" there's a scene where Tom enters and asks Yusuf how he's doing (that being the first beat; Tom checking in on Yusuf). Then throughout the scene Yusuf (at that point under the influence of an Ancient device) starts revealing to Tom his hidden intensions, and it starts becoming more obvious that he's turning into a threat (which would be another beat). So you break it down all the way to the end, and then you'll be able to figure out that dialogue.

Again, I think every writer has their own way of doing it. Some writers might have a more elaborate way of approaching this than others. They might do a breakdown like that on paper or index cards for every scene they write, while others just do all of that in their head when starting to write the scene. In most cases I tend to do that latter; but it really depends on the scene. Our outlines on Horizon are often quite detailed, and already handle most of the breaking down the beats. Those outlines often make writing the actual script a lot easier.

Col.Foley
October 14th, 2006, 02:00 PM
WOW! My head hurts from all the insight. Then again it could be the cold I am starting to get. :( http://forum.gateworld.net/images/gw_smilies/frown.gif
:(
Question Four: How did you develop your characters before and during writing Horizon Episodes?

Alex Rubit
October 14th, 2006, 02:13 PM
WOW! My head hurts from all the insight. Then again it could be the cold I am starting to get. :( http://forum.gateworld.net/images/gw_smilies/frown.gif
:(

I was aiming to be somewhat insightful. :cameron:

Sorry to hear about your cold.


Question Four: How did you develop your characters before and during writing Horizon Episodes?

That really again always depends on the story. Say we have a story where the Phoenix Coalition has made some kind of deal with the Enoly, so we need to have a character who represents the Phoenix Coalition. That then leads to the idea of a powerful, international buisnessman, who then becomes James Edmunds in last season's mid-season three parter. Then over the course of the story we start learning more about him, his intentions and reasoning, etc. So it was a case where the story again has set up what kind of character is required, and then it's a matter of fleshing out that character. This often can be done by backstory, but it also can be done by just playing specific character beats that end up defining the character. A great example in the case of James Edmunds could be the scene in "Path of Revelation, Part Two" where he talks to Murphy alone on the Enoly ship. Because in that scene we learn just how far the Edmunds character is really willing to go to achieve his goals.

That's always my approach, as I was saying earlier. Finding the basics of a character, and knowing that the character's purpose and function will be. And from there you just start working out the details. I do that on Horizon as well as other projects I work on developing.

Col.Foley
October 14th, 2006, 02:17 PM
Yep, wow.
My main problem with my writing so far is I feel two of my characters are not getting enough screen time. When any similar problems happen to you, what do you do to get your characters more screen time? To develop them more when you have not done enough of that?

Alex Rubit
October 14th, 2006, 02:27 PM
Yep, wow.
My main problem with my writing so far is I feel two of my characters are not getting enough screen time. When any similar problems happen to you, what do you do to get your characters more screen time? To develop them more when you have not done enough of that?

Interesting that you should mention that. Because that's often something we spent a lot of time talking about. Since there's a lot of characters on Horizon with eight regulars and several recurring characters, it can be quite a challenge.

It of course depends on what you're working on. In the case of an ongoing series like Horizon, we've come up with a way of kind of breaking it down into specific types of episodes. For example we may have an episode that's definitely a "Grant episode," because Grant is the primary character in the story. Then we might have a "team episode," where the focus is really the entire team, rather than one of the characters.

What we try to do is have at least one episode for each character, of which you can say it's a Callen episode, or a Sivea episode, or a David episode. With such a large ensemble the focus tends to shift from episode to episode, which is something I enjoy greatly both as a writer as well as an audience member. I've found that approaching a season in this particular way will help you ensuring that each of your characters will get their moments throughout the year.

But if you're working on something that isn't serialized, it tends to be more difficult. If you feel some of your characters aren't getting enough attention, you might want to go back to looking at what their function in the story is, and for what reason they're in the story to begin with. That might help you with coming up with additional beats for them. If that really doesn't work, you might have to just make their roles smaller. It depends on what works best.

Col.Foley
October 14th, 2006, 02:31 PM
Interesting ans somewhat disturbing point of view over all. About giving them smaller roles.
Now when you do a guest character, that you know will have a very limited role, like Edmunds, where you don't have as much time to develop them, how do you develop them in this situation?

Alex Rubit
October 14th, 2006, 02:38 PM
Interesting ans somewhat disturbing point of view over all. About giving them smaller roles.

That's really just if nothing else works out. It's really completely different from story to story. If the characters are meant to have larger roles, you most likely will find a way of making that work. It may take time, but eventually you tend to figure it out.


Now when you do a guest character, that you know will have a very limited role, like Edmunds, where you don't have as much time to develop them, how do you develop them in this situation?

In that case we tend to develop those characters as much as we can by giving them little moments in which we learn more about them. Like the scene with Edmunds and Murphy in "Path of Revelation, Part Two," that I mentioned. I really felt that was the scene that defined Edmunds, because it revealed a lot about him.

If it's a guest star you know most likely won't be coming back, you naturally won't get the chance to develop them as much as regular or recurring characters. So you just try to define them as clearly as possible. The most important thing is to try and avoid having them come off as two-dimensional, which can tend to happen in the cases of smaller parts if there's just no room for further development. But it's something you definitely want to try and avoid.

Col.Foley
October 14th, 2006, 02:58 PM
Yeah, yeah. I know exactly what you are talking about. In some ways this is more and less of a problem for me. I am writing a book, so in my case it would be more along the lines of chapters, instead of full episodes, but it might come out almost the same.
Question seven: Where do you go for research.

Alex Rubit
October 14th, 2006, 03:03 PM
Yeah, yeah. I know exactly what you are talking about. In some ways this is more and less of a problem for me. I am writing a book, so in my case it would be more along the lines of chapters, instead of full episodes, but it might come out almost the same.

Yeah, that's very true. That's where books, of course, differ from screenplays. You might be able to add a chapter or two to give some characters some more moments.


Question seven: Where do you go for research.

The research depends on the story and/or episode. I tend to do a lot of research, which can range all the way from scientific aspects to mythological backstory. I find it very important to try and be as realistic and accurate as possible; so I always tend to look up things online here and there. Usually I'll just do a Google search, and some useful sites will pop up.

When it comes to picking up on things or not contradicting anything established in the Stargate universe, I've found the GateWorld Omnipedia to be very helpful.

Col.Foley
October 14th, 2006, 03:07 PM
Yeah I know, the Gate world is a great site. I have done some research there to.
Question eight: How many re writes do you go through while writing?

Alex Rubit
October 14th, 2006, 03:18 PM
Yeah I know, the Gate world is a great site. I have done some research there to.
Question eight: How many re writes do you go through while writing?

That depends on each of the episodes. Every episode is different. We've had episodes that have been through several extensive rewrites, while others pretty much remained the way they were since the first draft.

As I said earlier, I tend to re-read the parts I've already written while still writing the script. And as I do that I tend to make changes here and there. So by the time I turn in a final draft, it's already been revised several times by myself. I know some writers don't like the process of rewriting; however, there's no way of avoiding that. Writing is really only half of the work, rewriting and polishing being the other half.

So we spent a lot of time on rewrites. We've even had entire story outlines or partial scripts that ended up being abandoned, so that we could start from scratch. Early in Season Three we were going to have an episode titled "Legend and Myth," but the story just never worked out. It went through a lot of different versions before it was abandoned and replaced with what's now "The Search, Parts One and Two."

Col.Foley
October 14th, 2006, 03:21 PM
Yeah I know. Like I said I go through the same thing. After I write I reread what I write, then change things that I can pick up on. Most of these things are just spelling and grammer, but still.
Question nine. How do you develop characters best, through action or through dialouge?

Alex Rubit
October 14th, 2006, 03:30 PM
Yeah I know. Like I said I go through the same thing. After I write I reread what I write, then change things that I can pick up on. Most of these things are just spelling and grammer, but still.
Question nine. How do you develop characters best, through action or through dialouge?

I think it's probably a combination of both. In a way it also depends on the medium. Television tends to be more dialogue driven than features; so it's great if you can break that convention every now and then. But dialogue can reveal a lot about a character, and give some interesting insight.

Ultimatly I think both is equally important, while at the same time a character's actions can sometimes have a heavier impact than words, especially if these actions may come unexpected. It again depends on the context of the story.

Using another Horizon episode as example, if Tom had only talked about his hatred for the Enoly in "Aversion" it wouldn't have had the impact it had when he decided to go and confront Rileen with a weapon in his hands. But in the end it was his admitting to Lenori that he really thought about pulling the trigger that has an impact, because it reveals the darker side of Tom's character; things he's been keeping to himself for a very long time.

Col.Foley
October 14th, 2006, 03:34 PM
Very good example Alex. That was one of your better episodes of all time IMO. And so that you are right, it was a good way of doing that entire sequence.
Qeustion ten is abit on the wierd side. Which do you do first, wor on the action of the story, or work on the character development?

Alex Rubit
October 14th, 2006, 03:45 PM
Very good example Alex. That was one of your better episodes of all time IMO. And so that you are right, it was a good way of doing that entire sequence.
Qeustion ten is abit on the wierd side. Which do you do first, wor on the action of the story, or work on the character development?

It's not a weird question actually. And it really depends once more on what you're working on.

I tend to write very character driven in general. And Horizon is different from Stargate in general in that it tends to do more character driven episodes, which is just the different nature of the show. We've found that taking entire episodes from time to time, and have them basically work with limited or none action sequences works very well for us (i.e. "In Times of Despair" or an early episode of Season Three). I really approach the show primarily as a character drama that takes place in the Stargate universe.

So we never loose track of character development. But in most of the cases we come up with the story concept first, and then work in the character developments. Because at the end of the day it all comes down to the story. If the story doesn't work, the episode won't work.

However, there's also been cases where we realized we needed to develop a particular character some more, and it was about finding a story idea that could work well for doing that.

Col.Foley
October 14th, 2006, 03:50 PM
Yeah I have noticed that your stories are very character driven, one of the things I like about Horizon actually.
Question eleven. This question has actually come up once or twice in class, which has sort of got me thinking about being a writer. My question is, do you care fully plan out each episode, or do you have only a vague idea of where the episode will go and only let the writing 'flow' editing and fine tuning later?

Alex Rubit
October 14th, 2006, 04:21 PM
Yeah I have noticed that your stories are very character driven, one of the things I like about Horizon actually.
Question eleven. This question has actually come up once or twice in class, which has sort of got me thinking about being a writer. My question is, do you care fully plan out each episode, or do you have only a vague idea of where the episode will go and only let the writing 'flow' editing and fine tuning later?

By the time we get to the script for every episode the story has already been worked out in detail. That's really the only way you can go about doing a series that involves an entire writing staff, since otherwise you'd never quite know what exactly will happen in the episode until the first draft comes out.

So in our case (which is just the way it works on television shows) every episode goes through a regular process of development. It starts off with the actual episode pitch, which sometimes might only be a couple of lines, outlining what the episode would be about. Then we usually will break the story together during a story meeting. That means we'll talk through the story starting with the teaser, and going through each of the acts. We've had cases where this process has been more elaborate than in others; usually it comes down to how much time we have. Sometimes we might just discuss the story idea, give everyone the chance to give notes on it, and then we'll proceed with the outline.

An outline will then basically break down the story into scenes, and it will describe what each of the scenes will be about. It's like a blue print of the script, because you'll get a very clear idea of the episode before the first draft is even written. And only after we have a final version of an outline (they may go through some revisions first) we'll move on to the script.

However, this process is something that depends greatly on the form of writing. In the cases of published novels I've heard that some writers sometimes tend too start a book, not knowing for sure how it will end.

While this seems to work in the case of novels, screenwriting is a different story. Screenwriting, more than every other form of writing, depends on structure. Every feature film screenplay will be based on the same structure of beginning, middle and end, otherwise known as the first, second and third act (which differs from the four or five act structure of one hour teleplays). There's set ups and pay offs, etc. So in the case of screenplays the story needs to be worked out first, which is commonly known as "breaking the story." I'm actually doing that right now with the story for a movie I'm planning to write, and one of these days (read a couple of years down the road) plan to produce and direct.

Col.Foley
October 14th, 2006, 04:29 PM
However, this process is something that depends greatly on the form of writing. In the cases of published novels I've heard that some writers sometimes tend too start a book, not knowing for sure how it will end.

That is what I heard too, which is the reason I asked the question.
Question twelve: Relate back to question two: If you get into a funk, or get stcuk, what do you do to get out of it,
What do you do?
Where do you go?

Alex Rubit
October 14th, 2006, 04:40 PM
However, this process is something that depends greatly on the form of writing. In the cases of published novels I've heard that some writers sometimes tend too start a book, not knowing for sure how it will end.

That is what I heard too, which is the reason I asked the question.
Question twelve: Relate back to question two: If you get into a funk, or get stcuk, what do you do to get out of it,
What do you do?
Where do you go?

If I don't work on something else (which I usually do, since I tend to work on various episodes at the same time), I'll just go and do something completely unrelated. I don't really have anything specific, though. If there's time, I might just let the story that's causing problems sit for a couple of days, and then get back to it with a fresh perspective.

I do tend to think about the things I'm working on all the time actually; say when there's a particular slow/somewhat boring day at work, I'll come up with some ideas that might perhaps work for an episode.

Here the good thing is if one of us gets stuck, we can just let the rest of the writing staff in on it, and we'll find a way together to make something work.

Col.Foley
October 14th, 2006, 04:47 PM
Yeah, that is what I do ocaasionally, like when I get to school in the early morning I do tend to think about my book, or over lunch. Or any other problem relating to the teenaga physche. So just one more way where we do the same thing, I guess if that saying is true I am going to be a very good writer one day.;)
Alright we are down to our last actual interview question, relating to the book and wat I need. However I have some other questions un related to the book that I would like to aske before we log off.
Question thirteen: The one thing that I cannot do yet, convincingly, is create a really evil, and sometimes even perverted, sick character. How do you do it?
What frame of mind do you have to be in to pull this off?

Alex Rubit
October 14th, 2006, 05:08 PM
Yeah, that is what I do ocaasionally, like when I get to school in the early morning I do tend to think about my book, or over lunch. Or any other problem relating to the teenaga physche. So just one more way where we do the same thing, I guess if that saying is true I am going to be a very good writer one day.;)
Alright we are down to our last actual interview question, relating to the book and wat I need. However I have some other questions un related to the book that I would like to aske before we log off.
Question thirteen: The one thing that I cannot do yet, convincingly, is create a really evil, and sometimes even perverted, sick character. How do you do it?
What frame of mind do you have to be in to pull this off?

The trick is really to understand that normally no one thinks that they are evil. Even if you have a character who seems to be evil, in the character's mind he or she isn't. They think that they're way is right, and that what they're trying to do is the "right thing" from their point of view. In a lot of cases they might think that they're simply superior.

Then it's really just a matter of working out a character like any other character. A villain will usually try to achieve some kind of goal throughout the story (in sci-fi that could be something like trying to conquer the galaxy), and in most cases they'll be willing to do what it takes to achieve that goal without being concerned about harming innocent people and things like that.

So it's really just a matter of understanding that character's motivations and intensions, and playing those beats that will make them appear evil, while from their point of view they're definitely not evil. Even if it's a character who might in a sick way enjoy seeing other people suffering, that character is usually driven by some kind of motivation or goal.

One of my favorite villains on Horizon is Loral. Because she definitely tends to come across as evil, while in her mind she's just superior to everyone else (even other Enoly), and it's only reasonable to her that everyone else realizes that. And if they don't, they need to be dealt with.

Col.Foley
October 14th, 2006, 05:18 PM
Exactly to all.
Now for my un related questions regarding various topics.
1. If I have another question about my book that I think you would be qualified to answer can I ask at any time?
2. Cuoriousity. Under the join date on the threads soem people have a location, like yours is in the office working hard on season three, my question how can I do that?
3. Also can I give you a electronic copy via e-mail of my first book, so I can get a professional opinion on it, then a fellow students?
I am going to log off so I can get some dinner.
I will respond to your response in the morning.
Thanks sincerly for your very indepth interview.

SierraGulf1
October 14th, 2006, 05:22 PM
Been following the topic from its conception to the end of the interview right now. The questions were very specific and in-depth, and the answers were, as Foley said, very insightful and a great read.

Alex Rubit
October 14th, 2006, 05:31 PM
Exactly to all.
Now for my un related questions regarding various topics.
1. If I have another question about my book that I think you would be qualified to answer can I ask at any time?

Sure. You can post them either here, or in the Ask The Horizon Team thread, or email or PM them. Whichever you like.


2. Cuoriousity. Under the join date on the threads soem people have a location, like yours is in the office working hard on season three, my question how can I do that?

Just go to My Controls which is almost in the top right corner of the screen. Then go to Edit Profile, which will be on the left hand side of the screen. Then you can edit all kinds of things like date of birth, email addresses, etc. If you go down to where it says Location, you can enter anything you like.


3. Also can I give you a electronic copy via e-mail of my first book, so I can get a professional opinion on it, then a fellow students?

Sure. It's quite an honor that you're interested in my opinion on it, so I'm definitely looking forward to reading it.


I am going to log off so I can get some dinner.
I will respond to your response in the morning.
Thanks sincerly for your very indepth interview.

Thank you. It's definitely been my pleasure.

Good luck with your book.

Col.Foley
October 15th, 2006, 07:54 PM
Thank You.

Now that I have that, I need your email adress, to email the book.
Second is another unrelated question. For the writing oppertunity that you had at the end of season two, I wanted to do that, but decided with my own book writing and my school schedule that I would not be able to really do it. So I have an alternative.
Can I pitch my idea for what i thought of as an episode to you at some later date?

Alex Rubit
October 15th, 2006, 08:42 PM
Thank You.

Now that I have that, I need your email adress, to email the book.

That's [email protected]


Second is another unrelated question. For the writing oppertunity that you had at the end of season two, I wanted to do that, but decided with my own book writing and my school schedule that I would not be able to really do it. So I have an alternative.
Can I pitch my idea for what i thought of as an episode to you at some later date?

Sure. We do accept pitches from outside the staff. The best way to do that is to attach the episode pitch to an email, and send it to me.

We're not looking for any staff writers at the moment, but there's still the possibility of one or two freelance opportunities later down the road, if that would be something you'd have the time for and are interested in.

Col.Foley
October 16th, 2006, 05:52 AM
I have the interest, but I may not have the time.

Col.Foley
October 21st, 2006, 08:24 PM
Alex, just letting you know. I just emailed my episode picth to you, a few moments ago.