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SG-25CSAR
October 22nd, 2007, 03:43 PM
First of all
after seeing the thread about Daniel being a better choice, I ask: How would Daniel go on about the situation in this episode had he been incharge instead of Carter? What would he have done?
Or if Weir was still there, Same questions just for fun.

Ltcolshepjumper
October 22nd, 2007, 04:37 PM
When you really think about it, they'd do the exact same thing. Nothing would be different. except Ronon wouldn't be as angry. However, I really don't know how Daniel would handle a situation like that. He's never been in any command position in all of his 10 years. I think he'd be very ill equipped. He's just not qualified to be a leader.

P-90_177
October 22nd, 2007, 04:44 PM
i reckon both danial and weir would have most likely just sent a couple more commandos and done more or less the same plan. It's just that carter has more military experience and didn't want to risk any more people than she had to.

Ltcolshepjumper
October 22nd, 2007, 04:53 PM
Really, the only difference is that Carter has to obey orders.

garhkal
October 22nd, 2007, 08:11 PM
When you really think about it, they'd do the exact same thing. Nothing would be different. except Ronon wouldn't be as angry. However, I really don't know how Daniel would handle a situation like that. He's never been in any command position in all of his 10 years. I think he'd be very ill equipped. He's just not qualified to be a leader.

From all i have seen of daniel, i think he would have trusted Ronons' thoughts o the matter..

ReganX
October 28th, 2007, 03:40 AM
Really, the only difference is that Carter has to obey orders.

So would Daniel or Weir; they may not be liable to court martial but they can certainly be fired.

ReganX
October 28th, 2007, 03:40 AM
From all i have seen of daniel, i think he would have trusted Ronons' thoughts o the matter..

And let Wraith followers into Atlantis.

ReganX
October 28th, 2007, 03:42 AM
i reckon both danial and weir would have most likely just sent a couple more commandos and done more or less the same plan. It's just that carter has more military experience and didn't want to risk any more people than she had to.

No, if Daniel was in charge then Sheppard's team would already have gone off on their suicide mission to rescue Weir. Since Daniel is a civilian, Sheppard would be in charge of the military side of things and Daniel wouldn't have the authority to stop him as Sam did.

Agent_Dark
October 28th, 2007, 02:31 PM
First of all
after seeing the thread about Daniel being a better choice, I ask: How would Daniel go on about the situation in this episode had he been incharge instead of Carter? What would he have done?
Or if Weir was still there, Same questions just for fun.

probably would have tried to turtle up for howitzers and wondered why they got pwned by stormtroopers with panzershreks in their base.

Matt G
October 29th, 2007, 04:02 PM
No, if Daniel was in charge then Sheppard's team would already have gone off on their suicide mission to rescue Weir. Since Daniel is a civilian, Sheppard would be in charge of the military side of things and Daniel wouldn't have the authority to stop him as Sam did.

In Rising, Weir was reluctant to authorise Sheppard's rescue mission for Sumner but she was still the one who had to authorise it! Daniel would have been in the same position concerning a Weir rescue.

ReganX
October 30th, 2007, 01:23 PM
In Rising, Weir was reluctant to authorise Sheppard's rescue mission for Sumner but she was still the one who had to authorise it! Daniel would have been in the same position concerning a Weir rescue.

During Rising, Sumner was still military leader. Sheppard had not yet assumed that role and the situation was still rather muddled. Once he did, it was made clear that he was in charge of military decisions - which is why I think that it was wise for the IOA to choose a military officer to command the city and avoid the problems of a dual command.

Weir and Daniel, through no fault of their own, have a disadvantage that Sam, or another military officer would not because they would never have full command of the city. Having a situation like the one in "Hot Zone", where Sheppard can order a military member of the expedition to disobey Weir's direct instructions, is a recipe for trouble.

Cautious Explorer
October 30th, 2007, 03:35 PM
During Rising, Sumner was still military leader. Sheppard had not yet assumed that role and the situation was still rather muddled. Once he did, it was made clear that he was in charge of military decisions - which is why I think that it was wise for the IOA to choose a military officer to command the city and avoid the problems of a dual command.

Weir and Daniel, through no fault of their own, have a disadvantage that Sam, or another military officer would not because they would never have full command of the city. Having a situation like the one in "Hot Zone", where Sheppard can order a military member of the expedition to disobey Weir's direct instructions, is a recipe for trouble.

Sheppard knew that Sumner was in enemy hands. There was no question about who was next in rank. At that moment Sheppard was military commander. He deferred to Weir as leader of the expedition, since it was still her call whether to approve the mission or not. There may have been misunderstandings as to what was a military matter, but Rising wasn't one of those times.

ReganX
October 30th, 2007, 04:00 PM
Sheppard knew that Sumner was in enemy hands. There was no question about who was next in rank. At that moment Sheppard was military commander. He deferred to Weir as leader of the expedition, since it was still her call whether to approve the mission or not. There may have been misunderstandings as to what was a military matter, but Rising wasn't one of those times.

I don't dispute that Sheppard was the highest-ranking military officer who hadn't been captured, but was he actually the military commander at that point - if, hypothetically speaking, Colonel Sumner, in his capacity as military commander, had given a direct order prior to his being captured that under no circumstances were they to mount a rescue mission, would Sheppard have had the authority to countermand that order?

Later in the first season, he would take it upon himself to counter Weir's authority in a situation where it was questionable whether or not it was a military matter and it is made clear then that it is he who calls the shots in a military situation - so why then would he have gone through Weir if, as you say, the question of a rescue in "Rising" was indisputably a military matter?

I can see two possible explanations; firstly, that Sheppard was not yet acting in the capacity of military commander when he asked Weir about a rescue mission and therefore did not yet have the authority to make the call himself - perhaps the more likely scenario - or secondly that whatever, if any, arrangements had been made between Weir and Sumner prior to their setting off for Atlantis, once Sumner was dead and Sheppard took on the role of military commander, he and Weir more or less had to thrash out their own arrangements and that at some point after "Rising", they agreed that he would be in charge during military situations.